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Steam Locomotives of the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway (L&YR)[Inhalt]
Lancashire & Yorkshire class 53
Great Britain | 1847 | 82 produced
After the rebuild to 2-4-0
After the rebuild to 2-4-0
Locomotive Magazine, March 1906

Between 1847 and 1849, the Lancashire & Yorkshire received a total of 82 express locomotives with a 2-2-2 wheel arrangement. These date from the time of John Hawkshaw, who was not actually a locomotive designer and whose designs are not considered the most successful. There were three slightly different variants, which differed primarily in the driving wheel diameter.

One version had a wheel diameter of 5 feet 9 inches and was built 26 times at the L&YR plants in Miles Platting. 17 of the same design came from William Fairbairn. Six and four respectively of another version with a wheel diameter of 5 feet and 6 inches were made by the same manufacturers. Finally there were 29 from Bury, Curtis & Kennedy with 5 feet 10 inches.

Of the total of 82 locomotives, 69 were converted between 1867 and 1872 to a 2-4-0 wheel arrangement. Some received new cylinders with a diameter of 15.5 instead of 15 inches and a new boiler. The locomotives with the original boiler stayed in service until 1880 at the latest, and the others a few years longer.

Variantas builtrebuilt 2-4-0
General
Built1847-18491867-1872
ManufacturerMiles Platting, Fairbairn, Bury, Curtis & KennedyMiles Platting
Axle config2-2-2 (Jenny Lind) 2-4-0 (Porter) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase13 ft 2 in14 ft 4 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 2 in14 ft 4 in
Service weight54,096 lbs
Adhesive weight27,776 lbs
Axle load27,776 lbs
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power250 hp (186 kW)300 hp (224 kW)
Optimal speed26 mph27 mph
Starting effort6,098 lbf7,103 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure110 psi120 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 15 x 20 intwo, 15 1/2 x 20 in
Boiler
Grate area14.4 sq ft
Firebox area86 sq ft
Tube heating area809 sq ft
Evaporative heating area895 sq ft
Total heating area895 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
John Hawkshaw
last changed: 03/2023
Lancashire & Yorkshire classes 5 and 6
Great Britain | 1889 | 354 produced
No. 1051 with crew
No. 1051 with crew
Bulgarisches Staatsarchiv, Sofia
Variant56
General
Built1889-19111911-1914
ManufacturerHorwich
Axle config2-4-2T (Columbia) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length39 ft 2 1/2 in
Wheelbase24 ft 4 in
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 7 in
Service weight127,120 lbs148,848 lbs
Adhesive weight71,120 lbs87,920 lbs
Axle load39,200 lbs44,128 lbs
Water capacity1,609 us gal1,849 us gal
Fuel capacity5,040 lbs (coal)7,056 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power600 hp (447 kW)850 hp (634 kW)
Optimal speed24 mph22 mph
Starting effort15,925 lbf24,585 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter68 in
Boiler pressure160 psi180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 1/2 x 26 intwo, 20 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area18.8 sq ft
Firebox area107.7 sq ft107.4 sq ft
Tube heating area1,108.3 sq ft812.6 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,216 sq ft920 sq ft
Superheater area195 sq ft
Total heating area1,216 sq ft1,115 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 10 2023
Lancashire & Yorkshire class 7 “High-Flyers”
Great Britain | 1899 | 40 produced
flickr/Historical Railway Images

Also known as “High-Flyers”, the Lancashire & Yorkshire class 7 locomotives were among the first Atlantics in Britain. Their nickname came from the high-pitched boiler that lay above the 7 ft 3 in high driving wheels. Aspinall had developed them to get a more powerful replacement for the existing 4-4-0 and 4-2-2 locomotives. As with Ivatt, this wheel arrangement was chosen to accommodate a larger, albeit narrow, firebox

At the time of their introduction, they had the largest boiler of any British steam locomotive and reached high average speeds with the relatively light trains. While No. 1417's alleged speed of 117 mph is highly questionable, No. 1392 likely actually reached 100 mph with a five-car train on a trial run in 1899.

After one of the locos was the first in Britain to be fitted with an early superheater, five others were also fitted with it, but this was later removed. After the grouping, they were the only 4-4-2 tender locomotives on the LMS and were grouped into power class 2P. The withdrawals took place between 1926 and 1934.

General
Built1899-1902
ManufacturerHorwich
Axle config4-4-2 (Atlantic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase27 ft 9 in
Fixed wheelbase7 ft 3 1/2 in
Service weight131,600 lbs
Adhesive weight78,400 lbs
Total weight200,284 lbs
Axle load39,200 lbs
Water capacity3,303 us gal
Fuel capacity11,760 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power950 hp (708 kW)
Optimal speed37 mph
Starting effort16,506 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter87 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 19 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area26.1 sq ft
Firebox area175.8 sq ft
Tube heating area1,877.2 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,053 sq ft
Total heating area2,053 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
John Aspinall
last changed: 08/2023
Lancashire & Yorkshire class 25
London, Midland & Scottish class 2F
Great Britain | 1876 | 280 produced
LMS 12031, ex No. 944
LMS 12031, ex No. 944
collection F. Verrall

Directly after his appointment as superintendent of the Lancashire & Yorkshire, William Barton Wright designed the class 25 as a standard goods locomotive. Between 1876 and 1887, different commercial manufacturers and the LYR's own Miles Platting workshops produced a total of 280 of these locomotives also called “Ironclads”. The first 72 had a smaller boiler than the remaining 208.

Between 1891 and 1900, 230 were rebuilt to class 23 saddle tank locomotives. At the LMS, the non-rebuilt locomotives were classed in power class 2F. Withdrawals commenced in 1930, but 23 managed to survive into BR ownership. The last ones were withdrawn in 1959. The only non-rebuilt locomotive that was preserved is BR 52044, former LYR 957 and now running on the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway. Class 23 No. 752 is now running on the East Lancashire Railway, carrying the fictitious BR No. 51456.

Variantsmaller boilerlarger boiler
General
Built1876-1887
ManufacturerBeyer, Peacock & Co., Vulcan Foundry, Sharp, Stewart & Co., Kitson & Co., Miles Platting
Axle config0-6-0 (Six-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase15 ft
Fixed wheelbase15 ft
Service weight83,216 lbs85,344 lbs
Adhesive weight83,216 lbs85,344 lbs
Total weight143,920 lbs146,048 lbs
Axle load28,560 lbs29,904 lbs
Water capacity2,702 us gal
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power450 hp (336 kW)475 hp (354 kW)
Optimal speed16 mph
Starting effort17,547 lbf19,512 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter54 in55.5 in
Boiler pressure140 psi160 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area19 sq ft19.5 sq ft
Firebox area90.5 sq ft89 sq ft
Tube heating area970.5 sq ft946 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,061 sq ft1,035 sq ft
Total heating area1,061 sq ft1,035 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
William Barton Wright
last changed: 05/2024
Lancashire & Yorkshire class 26
Great Britain | 1903 | 20 produced
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, April 1904

Hoy developed a heavy tank locomotive for heavy passenger trains on routes with many stops and gradients of more than two percent. With three coupled axles and a wheel diameter of 5 feet 8 inches, good acceleration and high speed should be achieved at the same time. They had a scoop device to fill up the water tanks while driving. The wheel flanges on the second coupled axle had to be removed later due to wear and tear on the rails. Since this brought new problems, they were put into shunting service as early as 1913. Because they were not suitable for this either, they were retired between 1920 and 1926.

General
Built1903-1904
ManufacturerHorwich
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length42 ft 4 in
Wheelbase27 ft 7 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 4 in
Service weight173,645 lbs
Adhesive weight117,264 lbs
Axle load40,236 lbs
Water capacity2,402 us gal
Fuel capacity8,400 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power900 hp (671 kW)
Optimal speed28 mph
Starting effort20,532 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter68 in
Boiler pressure175 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 19 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area26.1 sq ft
Firebox area161.6 sq ft
Tube heating area1,877 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,038.6 sq ft
Total heating area2,038.6 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
tank locomotive
passenger
Henry Albert Hoy
last changed: 03/2023
Lancashire & Yorkshire class 27
London, Midland & Scottish clas 3F
Great Britain | 1889 | 484 produced
No. 1068
No. 1068
Bulgarisches Zentrales Staatsarchiv, Sofia
General
Built1889-1918
ManufacturerHorwich
Axle config0-6-0 (Six-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length48 ft 6 in
Wheelbase16 ft 4 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 4 in
Service weight94,416 lbs
Adhesive weight94,416 lbs
Total weight152,936 lbs
Axle load33,600 lbs
Water capacity2,162 us gal
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power600 hp (447 kW)
Optimal speed20 mph
Starting effort18,781 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter61 in
Boiler pressure160 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area18.8 sq ft
Firebox area107.7 sq ft
Tube heating area1,102.3 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,210 sq ft
Total heating area1,210 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 10 2023
Lancashire & Yorkshire class 30 (Hughes)
London, Midland & Scottish class 6F
Great Britain | 1907 | 80 produced
Locomotive Magazine, August 1907

George Hughes produced his first class 30 locomotive by rebuiding a class 30 locomotive from his predecessor Aspinall to a four-cylinder compound engine. Ten more were created in this form. Other locomotives with two cylinders and simple steam expansion, which were built from 1910 onwards, were also assigned to class 30. 29 of these had been converted from Aspinall's class 30 and 40 more had Hughes built new at Horwich. Later they received superheaters so that they were similar to the class 31. They were assigned to power class 6F by the LMS. The last engines survived the formation of British Railways and were retired in 1951.

Variantcompoundsimple
General
Built19071910-1918
ManufacturerHorwich
Axle config0-8-0 (Eight-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight136,192 lbs149,632 lbs
Adhesive weight136,192 lbs149,632 lbs
Total weight229,040 lbs242,480 lbs
Axle load34,048 lbs39,200 lbs
Water capacity4,323 us gal
Fuel capacity11,200 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Starting effort69,901 lbf29,467 lbf
with start valve83,881 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter54 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typecompoundsimple
Cylindersfour, HP: 155 x 26 in
and LP: 22 x 26 in
two, 20 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area23.1 sq ft25.6 sq ft
Firebox area147 sq ft190 sq ft
Tube heating area1,767 sq ft2,263 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,914 sq ft2,453 sq ft
Total heating area1,914 sq ft2,453 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
George Hughes
two-axle compound
last changed: 04/2023
Lancashire & Yorkshire class 32
London, Midland & Scottish class 6F
Great Britain | 1908 | 5 produced
Locomotive Magazine, May 1909

Since the Great Northern's L1, it had become the fashion in Britain to procure very heavy tank locomotives without a leading axle for jobs requiring high tractive effort or rapid acceleration. The poorer running smoothness at higher speeds and the shorter range compared to a tender locomotive could be ignored here. While the L1 was built for the rapid acceleration of commuter trains, the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway's Class 32 was intended to be used for heavy shunting or hauling freight trains. The area of application was primarily in the port of Liverpool, which had short, steep gradients. George Hughes, chief engineer of the L&YR, based the development to a certain extent on the class 30 D tender locomotive of his predecessor Aspinall.

The diameter of the boiler was increased by a full foot while still sticking to the saturated steam principle. Considerations had come to the conclusion that the superheaters of the time did not work with full efficiency in shunting operations and that the additional complexity would therefore not be expedient. The wheelbase of the coupled axles was increased, which required the four middle coupled wheels to be designed without flanges. The cylinders were very large for a locomotive without a compound engine and powered the second axle. They provided a pulling force of about 34,000 pounds

The last built engine, No. 1505
The last built engine, No. 1505

Five examples were ordered, all delivered in March and April 1908. Their use was initially planned on the shunting yards in Aintree with humps, but this was ultimately not possible. The reason for this was that some chassis parts damaged the conductor rails attached there. Ultimately they were stationed at Accrington and Agecroft and used for heavy shunting and pushing work. After the grouping of 1923, the L&YR belonged to the LMS and there there was no great need for small classes with a few vehicles. Therefore, they were retired between 1925 and 1929 when the maintenance deadlines for the boilers expired.

General
Built1908
ManufacturerHorwich
Axle config0-8-2T (River Irt) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase24 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase17 ft
Service weight188,160 lbs
Adhesive weight152,320 lbs
Axle load39,200 lbs
Water capacity2,402 us gal
Fuel capacity6,720 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power950 hp (708 kW)
Optimal speed18 mph
Starting effort34,052 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter54 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 21 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area25.6 sq ft
Firebox area190 sq ft
Tube heating area2,008 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,198 sq ft
Total heating area2,198 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
tank locomotive
George Hughes
last changed: 02/2022
Lancashire & Yorkshire class 629
Barton Wright 4-4-0
Great Britain | 1880 | 110 produced
No. 815
No. 815
Tony Hisgett / 4-4-0 L&YR 815

In William Barton Wright's effort to unify the Lancashire & Yorkshire fleet with a smaller number of locomotive classes, the class 629 was developed as a 4-4-0 express locomotive. The first eight came in 1880 from Sharp, Stewart & Co., where most of the development took place. They had a driving wheel diameter of six feet (1,829 mm), which meant that even topographically demanding lines were no problem. Compared to the previous 2-4-0 locomotives, smaller tenders initially had to be used because the turntables were too short.

Other batches came from Sharp, Kitson and Vulcan. The last 16 were delivered by Vulcan in 1887 under Aspinall, bringing the total to 110. These had a longer wheelbase between the driving axles, a different type of suspension and smaller bogie wheels. All but two of the class 629 locomotives were retired by 1914. These two went first to the LNWR and then to the LMS, where they were decommissioned in 1930. Aspinall used class 629 as the basis for his classes 2 and 3.

General
Built1880-1887
ManufacturerSharp, Stewart & Co., Kitson & Co., Neilson & Co., Vulcan Foundry
Axle config4-4-0 (American) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase20 ft 9 1/2 in
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 7 in
Service weight95,200 lbs
Adhesive weight64,960 lbs
Total weight155,904 lbs
Axle load32,816 lbs
Water capacity2,882 us gal
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power525 hp (391 kW)
Optimal speed25 mph
Starting effort13,160 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter72 in
Boiler pressure140 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area19.3 sq ft
Firebox area90.5 sq ft
Tube heating area938.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,029 sq ft
Total heating area1,029 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
William Barton Wright
last changed: 04/2024
Lancashire & Yorkshire Hughes 4-6-4T “Dreadnought Tanks”
London, Midland & Scottish class 5P
Great Britain | 1924 | 10 produced
Locomotive Magazine, August 1924

Based on the class 8 “Dreadnought”, George Hughes developed a tank locomotive that was also intended for express service. Thanks to the trailing bogie, it now had a 4-6-4T wheel arrangement. The boiler with Belpaire firebox basically resembled the original, but was somewhat lighter. There were no changes to the 75-inch (1,905 mm) diameter driving wheels and the four 16.5-inch (419 mm) diameter cylinders.

Although they had been developed for the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway, the ten locomotives were directly delivered to the LMS in 1924 and were designated class 5P. They were also known as “Dreadnought Tanks”. However, due to their heavy weight, their possible uses were limited, so that they could only be used between Manchester and Blackpool. A further order for 20 was therefore converted into class 8. The tank locomotives were withdrawn from service between 1938 and 1941.

General
Built1924
ManufacturerHorwich
Axle config4-6-4T (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length49 ft 10 1/2 in
Wheelbase40 ft 4 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 7 in
Service weight223,888 lbs
Adhesive weight125,440 lbs
Axle load41,815 lbs
Water capacity2,402 us gal
Fuel capacity8,960 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,450 hp (1,081 kW)
Optimal speed32 mph
Starting effort28,880 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter75 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylindersfour, 16 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area29.6 sq ft
Firebox area180 sq ft
Tube heating area1,817 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,997 sq ft
Superheater area343 sq ft
Total heating area2,340 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
tank locomotive
express
George Hughes
last changed: 04/2024
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