loco-info.com
The reference for locomotives and railcars
Navigation
Random
Search
Compare
Settings

Navigation

Page views since 2023-01-26: 261139
Steam Locomotives of the London & South Western Railway (LSWR)[Inhalt]
London & South Western Canute class
Great Britain | 1856 | 12 produced
Locomotive Magazine, July 1903

These twelve six and a half foot singles were designed by Beattie for the LSWR and built from 1856 onwards. After the name of the first machine, the locomotives were referred to as the “Canute class”. Many parts made of polished brass and the highly ornamental wheel arches were visually striking. Technically noteworthy was the firebox with combustion chamber. The service life of the locomotives ended between 1875 and 1885.

General
Built1856-1859
ManufacturerNine Elms
Axle config2-2-2 (Jenny Lind) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Total weight97,664 lbs
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power350 hp (261 kW)
Optimal speed33 mph
Starting effort6,694 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter78 in
Boiler pressure130 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 15 x 21 in
Boiler
Grate area16 sq ft
Firebox area144 sq ft
Tube heating area625 sq ft
Evaporative heating area769 sq ft
Total heating area769 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Joseph Hamilton Beattie
last changed: 03/2023
London & South Western Clyde class
Great Britain | 1859 | 13 produced
No. 99 “Phlegon”
No. 99 “Phlegon”
Locomotive Magazine, December 1903

To pull the most important express trains, the LSWR had three two-coupled locomotives built in Nine Elms in 1859, which were the first four-coupled standard-gauge engines in Great Britain with a driver diameter of seven feet. They bore the numbers 157 to 159 and were designated the Clyde class after the number 157 “Clyde”. Sometimes the class is called Lacy class after number 158. In the same year number 169 was built, which only had a dome on the firebox and none on the boiler barrel. The numbers 73 to 75 followed in 1864 and the numbers 95 to 100 in 1868. The last delivery is also known as the Centaur class, since it differed slightly from the older machines.

Schematic drawing of No. 157 “Clyde”
Schematic drawing of No. 157 “Clyde”
Locomotive Magazine, August 1903

According to Locomotive Magazine, they were Beattie's "favorite locos" and were therefore always kept in pristine condition. By the late 1870s, they pulled the heaviest express trains with ease. While the older machines disappeared from the scene as early as 1883, four of the six examples from the last delivery received new boilers between 1887 and 1890. They were also subject to multiple rebuilds, so that ultimately each locomotive was a one-off. These last ones were only phased out in 1899 and most of these had achieved a mileage of one million miles

General
Built1859, 1864, 1868
ManufacturerNine Elms
Axle config2-4-0 (Porter) 
Dimensions and Weights
Length43 ft 2 1/4 in
Wheelbase14 ft 2 1/2 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 2 1/2 in
Service weight79,632 lbs
Total weight126,224 lbs
Power
Power Plant
Driver diameter84 in
Boiler pressure130 psi
Cylinderstwo, 17 x 22 in
Boiler
Grate area17.8 sq ft
Firebox area98 sq ft
Tube heating area1,004 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,102 sq ft
Total heating area1,102 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Joseph Hamilton Beattie
last changed: 09/2022
London & South Western class 0298 “Beattie well tanks”
Great Britain | 1863 | 82 produced
No. 263 in the condition as delivered
No. 263 in the condition as delivered
Bulgarisches Staatsarchiv

For the operation of their London suburban lines, the LSWR planned to purchase small, three-axle tank locomotives. Between 1852 and 1859, Joseph Hamilton Beattie had a total of 26 tank locomotives of different designs built in order to determine the optimal design. Although some of the locomotives also had the 2-2-2T wheel arrangement, the choice fell on the 2-4-0T wheel arrangement and a driving wheel diameter of 66 inches. This ensured good acceleration, but also sufficient speed on sections with larger distances between stations.

Between 1863 and 1875 Beyer, Peacock & Co. built 82 locomotives. By 1872 the LSWR had built three more in their own workshops at Nine Elms. The cylinder diameter of the first copies was 15 inches, this was later increased to 15.5 and then to 16.5 inches. The last twelve locomotives again had cylinders with a diameter of 15.5 inches, but a stroke of 22 instead of 21 inches. The two water tanks were located above the leading axle and under the driver's cab floor. Since this design is referred to as “well tanks” in the English-speaking world, they were given their well-known nickname.

From 1890 they were pushed out of their original area of operation because more powerful tank locomotives were now available on the London suburban lines. Outside the metropolitan area, their water capacity soon proved inadequate. A total of 31 had been rebuilt into tender locomotives from 1883 onwards. The largest part of the fleet was retired by 1899, of which only the three with the numbers 298, 314 and 329 from the construction years 1874 and 1875 were spared.

Preserved No. 0314 at Buckinghamshire Railway Centre
Preserved No. 0314 at Buckinghamshire Railway Centre
Oxyman

These three came to the Bodmin and Wadebridge Railway in Cornwall, which carried kaolinite or “China Clay” to the main line. They underwent extensive modernization, including the addition of a cab. All three came to British Railways, where they were considered the oldest locomotive type still in use, if not the oldest locomotives at all. Two of them were preserved after they were retired in 1962 and are still operational today.

Variantas builtconverted tender locomotive
General
Built1863-18751883-1887
ManufacturerBeyer, Peacock & Co., Nine ElmsNine Elms
Axle config2-4-0WT (Porter) 2-4-0 (Porter) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length26 ft 2 in
Service weight77,168 lbs73,936 lbs
Adhesive weight53,648 lbs
Total weight120,416 lbs
Water capacity600 us gal
Fuel capacity2,240 lbs (coal)coal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power225 hp (168 kW)375 hp (280 kW)
Optimal speed19 mph24 mph
Starting effort7,534 lbf9,901 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter66 in
Boiler pressure130 psi160 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 15 x 20 intwo, 15 1/2 x 20 in
Boiler
Grate area14.8 sq ft
Firebox area80 sq ft96.8 sq ft
Tube heating area715 sq ft915.2 sq ft
Evaporative heating area795 sq ft1,012 sq ft
Total heating area795 sq ft1,012 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
Joseph Hamilton Beattie
last changed: 06/2022
London & South Western class 395
Great Britain | 1881 | 70 produced
British Railways No. 30580 in July 1955 shunting at Woking
British Railways No. 30580 in July 1955 shunting at Woking
Ben Brooksbank / Ex-LSWR '0395' class 0-6-0 shunting at Woking
General
Built1881-1886
ManufacturerNeilson & Co.
Axle config0-6-0 (Six-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase13 ft
Fixed wheelbase13 ft
Service weight84,224 lbs
Adhesive weight84,224 lbs
Total weight148,400 lbs
Axle load30,464 lbs
Water capacity3,002 us gal
Fuel capacity6,720 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power450 hp (336 kW)
Optimal speed18 mph
Starting effort15,533 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter61 in
Boiler pressure140 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area17.8 sq ft
Firebox area108 sq ft
Tube heating area1,079 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,187 sq ft
Total heating area1,187 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 10 2023
London & South Western class 415 “Radial Tanks”
Great Britain | 1882 | 71 produced
flickr/Historical Railway Images

For the suburban lines in London, William Adams provided his class 46, which had outside cylinders, with an additional trailing axle in order to be able to accommodate larger coal supplies. Since this axle was in a radial axle box, the locomotive was nicknamed the “Radial Tank”. Four manufacturers delivered a total of 71 locomotives, the last of which had a boiler pressure of 160 instead of 140 psi. As early as 1895, the locomotives were replaced by other locomotives in their original area of operation, after which they were relocated to branch lines in rural areas. After the first were retired in 1916, the largest number only disappeared between 1923 and 1928 under the Southern Railway. Three locomotives even survived on the Lyme Regis branch until 1961, because initially no other suitable locomotives were found for the tight curves. One of these today belongs to the Bluebell Railway but is not operational.

Variantfirst batcheslast batches
General
Built1882-1885
ManufacturerRobert Stephenson & Co., Dübs & Co., Neilson & Co., Beyer, Peackock & Co.
Axle config4-4-2T (Atlantic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length36 ft 5 1/2 in
Wheelbase29 ft 5 in
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 6 in
Service weight125,664 lbs
Adhesive weight69,440 lbs
Axle load34,720 lbs
Water capacity1,441 us gal
Fuel capacity2,240 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power525 hp (391 kW)560 hp (418 kW)
Optimal speed26 mph24 mph
Starting effort13,054 lbf14,919 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter67 in
Boiler pressure140 psi160 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 1/2 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area18.1 sq ft
Firebox area111 sq ft
Tube heating area945 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,056 sq ft
Total heating area1,056 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
Willian Adams
last changed: 08/2023
London & South Western class 700 “Black Motor”
Great Britain | 1897 | 30 produced
British Railways No. 30355 in May 1959 at Feltham depot
British Railways No. 30355 in May 1959 at Feltham depot
Ben Brooksbank / SR (ex-LSW) 0-6-0 at Feltham Locomotive Depot

Drummond had 30 freight locomotives built in 1897, which he had designed while still with the Caledonian. Construction eventually took place at Dübs in Scotland and they were nicknamed “Black Motors”. From 1919 all locomotives were fitted with a superheater, with the smoke box being lengthened. This process was continued under the Southern Railway and lasted until 1929. The superheater was partly of the Eastleigh works design and partly of the Maunsell design. Most machines were retired in 1961 and 1962.

Variantas builtsuperheated
General
Built18971919-1929
ManufacturerDübs & Co.Eastleigh
Axle config0-6-0 (Six-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length27 ft 7 5/8 in29 ft 1 5/8 ft
Length loco52 ft 7 1/4 in54 ft 1 1/4 in
Wheelbase16 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase39 ft 1 in
Empty weight86,464 lbs95,312 lbs
Service weight95,760 lbs104,608 lbs
Adhesive weight95,760 lbs104,608 lbs
Total weight177,968 lbs186,816 lbs
Axle load36,512 lbs38,080 lbs
Water capacity4,203 us gal
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power700 hp (522 kW)900 hp (671 kW)
Optimal speed21 mph24 mph
Starting effort21,699 lbf23,542 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter61 in
Boiler pressure175 psi180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 1/2 x 26 intwo, 19 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area20.4 sq ft
Firebox area124 sq ft117 sq ft
Tube heating area1,067 sq ft859.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,191 sq ft976.5 sq ft
Superheater area167 sq ft
Total heating area1,191 sq ft1,143.5 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
Dugald Drummond
last changed: 03/2023
London & South Western class M7
Great Britain | 1897 | 105 produced
British Railways No. 30053 in September 2014 at Bewdley
British Railways No. 30053 in September 2014 at Bewdley
Geof Sheppard

Dugald Drummond's first design for the LSWR was the class M7 0-4-4T tank locomotive, which was the larger successor to Adams' T1. While the driver diameter remained the same, over all the grate was enlarged, resulting in the heaviest British machine with this wheel arrangement. It was intended not only for suburban lines in London, but also for semi-fast trains. After a derailment at higher speeds, they were only used on suburban lines.

Between 1897 and 1911, 105 locomotives were built, differing in several details. These included different frame lengths, different arrangements of individual components such as the sandboxes and the reverser, which was initially a lever and later steam-operated. To reduce wear and tear, boiler pressure was reduced from 175 to 150 psi after high speed running on main lines was no longer necessary.

With the introduction of new locomotives on suburban lines, the M7 was increasingly used on branch lines. For this purpose, a larger number were equipped with push-pull controls, which initially worked using cables and pulleys. Later, a more reliable system that worked with air pressure was used. The retirements took place in greater numbers from 1958 onwards and were completed in 1964 after the M7 was replaced by modern standard steam locomotives, diesel locomotives and diesel multiple units. Two still exist today, of which 30053 is operational. It was based in Steamtown in the USA between 1967 and 1987 and is now stationed on the Swanage Railway.

Variantas builtreduced boiler pressure
General
Built1897-1911
ManufacturerNine Elms, Eastleigh
Axle config0-4-4T (Forney) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length34 ft 8 in
Wheelbase23 ft 7 in
Fixed wheelbase7 ft 6 in
Service weight134,736 lbs
Adhesive weight79,072 lbs
Water capacity1,561 us gal
Fuel capacity7,280 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power700 hp (522 kW)600 hp (447 kW)
Optimal speed23 mph
Starting effort19,756 lbf16,934 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter67 in
Boiler pressure175 psi150 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area20.4 sq ft
Firebox area123.9 sq ft
Tube heating area1,068.1 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,192 sq ft
Total heating area1,192 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
Dugald Drummond
last changed: 12/2023
London & South Western class C8
Great Britain | 1898 | 10 produced
Locomotive Magazine, June 1899

The ten engines of class C8 saw the light of day in 1898 as ordinary 4-4-0 locomotives. They were developed by Dugald Drummond and were initially considered not very successful because they did not achieve sufficient steaming capacity at high speeds due to a firebox that was too small. They could only show better performances after they had received a new boiler.

The new boilers used a patent of WS. Smith of the Midland Railway. They had an elongated firebox pierced by a total of 61 tubes that were exposed to the direct radiation of the fire. This more than doubled the direct heating surface, which significantly increased the output of the boiler.

Despite the increased power, the water-tubed firebox was not considered a success because the extra tubes made maintenance complicated. The fact that these pipes were exposed to very high temperatures meant greater effort. On later locomotives, precautions such as fire bricks or thermosiphons were used instead to increase the heating surface of the firebox. However, the ten locomotives remained in service and were only retired between 1933 and 1938 without having been converted to superheated steam

Variantas builtwater tube firebox
General
Built1898
ManufacturerNine Elms
Axle config4-4-0 (American) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length54 ft 11 in56 ft 5 1/2 in
Wheelbase23 ft 3 in
Fixed wheelbase11 ft
Total wheelbase46 ft 10 in
Service weight104,832 lbs122,192 lbs
Adhesive weight84,448 lbs
Axle load42,336 lbs
Water capacity4,203 us gal
Fuel capacity8,960 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power700 hp (522 kW)850 hp (634 kW)
Optimal speed27 mph32 mph
Starting effort16,755 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter79 in
Boiler pressure175 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area20.5 sq ft27 sq ft
Firebox area394 sq ft
Tube heating area1,106 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,500 sq ft
Total heating area1,500 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Dugald Drummond
last changed: 07/2022
London & South Western class L12 “Bulldogs”
Great Britain | 1904 | 20 produced
flickr/Historical Railway Images

The GWR and the LNWR were in direct competition for boat trains, i.e. the heavy non-stop express trains between London and the ports on the Channel coast. In light of the new GWR 4-4-0 locos such as the City Class, Dugald Drummond developed the L12 as a successor to the T9 “Greyhound”. Both were similar in many respects, including the diameter of the driving wheels, cylinder dimensions, boiler pressure and the water tubes in the firebox

With the boiler being shorter and thicker than that of the T9, they earned the nickname “Bulldogs”. Since the changes compared to the previous class were limited, they did not represent any particular improvement. The L12 also had a four-axle tender again in order to be able to run the line without stopping. Later, under Urie, they received a new boiler with a superheater that no longer had water pipes in the firebox

The class made negative headlines as early as 1906 when number 421 derailed with a boat train in Salisbury, killing 28 and injuring 11 others. The accident is generally attributed to the L12's higher center of gravity, although other locos would also probably have derailed at 70 mph while negotiating a 30 mph curve. From this point on, the competition between the two companies became less intense. However, the 421 was refurbished and all 20 examples survived until the formation of British Railways. 18 were retired in 1951 and the last two in 1953 and 1955 respectively.

Variantas builtsuperheated
General
Built1904-1905
ManufacturerNine Elms
Axle config4-4-0 (American) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length63 ft 9 in
Wheelbase23 ft 3 in
Fixed wheelbase10 ft
Service weight120,848 lbs119,169 lbs
Adhesive weight83,104 lbs78,623 lbs
Total weight221,200 lbs219,631 lbs
Axle load42,784 lbs40,768 lbs
Water capacity5,765 us gal
Fuel capacity9,856 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power800 hp (597 kW)1,100 hp (820 kW)
Optimal speed29 mph40 mph
Starting effort17,673 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter79 in
Boiler pressure175 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 19 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area24 sq ft
Firebox area328 sq ft195 sq ft
Tube heating area1,222 sq ft993 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,550 sq ft1,188 sq ft
Superheater area195 sq ft
Total heating area1,550 sq ft1,383 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Dugald Drummond
last changed: 07/2022
London & South Western class F13
Great Britain | 1905 | 5 produced
No. 330
No. 330
J.R. Howden, The Boys' Book of Locomotives

The London and South Western Railway made the jump from the 4-4-0 locomotive to the 4-6-0 in 1905 with the F13 class. The trigger for this were the so-called “Boat Trains”, which had to bring a constantly growing number of passengers with ever faster schedules to the ships on the English Channel coast. Since use was only to be expected on main routes, the designer Dugald Drummond hardly had to comply with any axle load restrictions. Due to the increased number of axles and the greater overall length, a significantly stronger boiler than on previous locomotives was possible. In order to exploit its capacity, a non-compound-action four-cylinder engine was used. Up to this point in time, engines with four cylinders were mostly only used in compound locomotives. Since the LSWR did not use water troughs to fill up during the journey, four-axle tenders with a correspondingly large capacity were used.

Schematic drawing with dimensions
Schematic drawing with dimensions
Locomotive Magazine, March 1921

Only five examples were built in 1905 in the LSWR workshops in London's Nine Elms. Although these locomotives looked very simple on the outside, the running gear was overly complex. The outer cylinders had Walschaerts-type valve gear, while the inner ones were controlled by their own Stephenson-type valve gear. The service with the Boat Trains between Salisbury and Exeter lasted only one year and was then discontinued. They were now repurposed as freight locomotives and henceforth had to haul coal trains between Salisbury and Southampton. One locomotive was fitted with the Eastleigh superheater introduced on the H15 in 1920, but this did not quite make up for the general weaknesses of the class. Eventually, all five F13s were converted to H15s starting in 1924.

Variantas builtsuperheated
General
Built19051921
ManufacturerNine Elms
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length63 ft 10 15/16 in
Wheelbase26 ft 10 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 4 in
Total wheelbase53 ft 2 in
Empty weight151,984 lbs
Service weight163,520 lbs165,536 lbs
Adhesive weight115,360 lbs118,272 lbs
Total weight263,983 lbs266,000 lbs
Axle load41,440 lbs
Water capacity6,966 us gal
Fuel capacity11,200 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,400 hp (1,044 kW)1,450 hp (1,081 kW)
Optimal speed35 mph36 mph
Starting effort25,387 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter72 in
Boiler pressure175 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylindersfour, 16 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area31.5 sq ft
Firebox area517 sq ft168 sq ft
Tube heating area2,210 sq ft1,716 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,727 sq ft1,884 sq ft
Superheater area308 sq ft
Total heating area2,727 sq ft2,192 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
Dugald Drummond
last changed: 04/2022
loading...

We use cookies to save the following settings:

  • selected navigation structure
  • selected language
  • preferred units
  • spelling of railway company names

If you refuse the use of cookies, the settings will only be retained for the current session and will be reset to the default values the next time you visit the site.

Display of units

Here you can set the desired unit system for the technical data.

  • Metric: Lengths in meters, weights in tonnes, and volumes in cubic meters
  • Imperial (UK): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in long tons and volumes in imperial gallons
  • Imperial (US): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in pounds, and volumes in US gallons
  • Individual: Depends on the country of origin of each locomotive
Operator names

Here you can set the display of railway company names.

  • Short: Abbreviation or short form of the name
  • Standard: commonly used name, partially translated to English
  • Complete: full name in local language