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Steam Locomotives of the Milwaukee Road (CMStP&P)[Inhalt]
Milwaukee & Mississippi No. 40
El Paso & Southwestern No. 1
United States | 1857 | only one produced
1953 post card with the No. 1 exhibited in El Paso
1953 post card with the No. 1 exhibited in El Paso

This locomotive saw the light of day as number 40 on the Milwaukee & Mississippi Railroad and still exists today after changing owners several times. It was built in 1857 by Breese, Kneeland & Company in Jersey City, New Jersey, christened the “Spring Green” and is the only surviving engine from this manufacturer today. The latter existed from 1853 to 1873 and was one of two manufacturers that operated simultaneously under the name New York Locomotive Works. The railway company was initially renamed the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien Railway Company in 1861 and became the property of the Milwaukee & St Paul Railroad in 1867. This made the locomotive number 111 of the company known from 1874 as the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad.

In 1889 the locomotive came to the southern United States, where it received the number 1, which it still bears today. Its new owner was the Arizona & Southeastern Railroad Company, which later operated as the El Paso & Southwestern Railroad. The network stretched between Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas across the border into Mexico. The locomotive was converted from wood to coal firing and received its current appearance with a long, narrow chimney and extended smokebox. It was used, among other things, to supply mines and was retired in 1903.

Just six years after the end of its service, the number 1 was optically brought back into shape and set up in the middle of downtown El Paso. In 1939 it was even allowed to play a role in the western movie “Let Freedom Ring”. In 1960 it was donated to the University of Texas at El Paso. From this time comes the anecdote that students often rang the bell of the locomotive at night and therefore the clapper had to be removed. Declared a national treasure in 1999, the locomotive was restored for over a million dollars over the following years. Since 2003 it can be found in the Railroad and Transportation Museum in El Paso.

General
Built1857
ManufacturerBreese, Kneeland & Co.
Axle config4-4-0 (American) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase20 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase6 ft 9 1/2 in
Service weight52,000 lbs
Fuel capacitywood
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power250 hp (186 kW)
Optimal speed22 mph
Starting effort7,232 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter64 in
Boiler pressure110 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 15 x 22 in
Boiler
Firebox area77 sq ft
Tube heating area716 sq ft
Evaporative heating area793 sq ft
Total heating area793 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
last changed: 03/2022
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) class A2
United States | 1901 | 43 produced
No. 919 on a Baldwin works photo
No. 919 on a Baldwin works photo

The Class A2 designated the first Atlantics on the Milwaukee Road to have a Vauclain-type compound engine. This means that there was a high and a low pressure cylinder on each side, which were connected to a common crosshead. The trailing axle had special inside bearings developed by J.H. DeVoy that were part of a large single casting.

Nine A2 and 15 A2a were built by Baldwin in 1901 and 1902 respectively. The five A2b had drivers whose diameter had been increased to 85 inches. While these were built in the railroad's own workshops in Milwaukee, the twelve A2cs were built again at Baldwin. These were all scrapped between 1927 and 1930.

An exception were two locomotives that were built in 1907. These had what was known in the USA as a “balanced compound” drive, which had separate inside and outside cylinders. These locomotives were rebuilt in 1938 to class A-4a with simple expansion and remained in service until 1951.

VariantA2A2aA2cA2 balanced compound
General
Built1901190219081907
ManufacturerBaldwinMilwaukee
Axle config4-4-2 (Atlantic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase27 ft 11 1/2 in29 ft 2 1/2 in32 ft 2 in
Fixed wheelbase7 ft 3 in7 ft 4 in7 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase56 ft 5 1/2 in61 ft 8 in53 ft 3 in
Service weight181,535 lbs177,470 lbs210,400 lbs195,000 lbs
Adhesive weight100,335 lbs92,450 lbs108,750 lbs106,000 lbs
Total weight321,000 lbs310,000 lbs343,000 lbs329,000 lbs
Axle load50,168 lbs46,225 lbs54,375 lbs53,000 lbs
Water capacity7,000 us gal
Fuel capacity18,000 lbs (coal)20,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,600 hp (1,193 kW)1,525 hp (1,137 kW)1,750 hp (1,305 kW)
Optimal speed54 mph55 mph48 mph55 mph
Starting effort18,750 lbf18,694 lbf20,382 lbf
with start valve22,500 lbf22,433 lbf24,458 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter84 in84.3 in85 in
Boiler pressure200 psi220 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 15 x 28 in
and LP: 25 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area46.7 sq ft45 sq ft45.8 sq ft
Firebox area183.3 sq ft173.3 sq ft214.3 sq ft183 sq ft
Tube heating area3,008.7 sq ft2,973.7 sq ft3,015 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,192 sq ft3,182 sq ft3,188 sq ft3,198 sq ft
Total heating area3,192 sq ft3,182 sq ft3,188 sq ft3,198 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Vauclain compound
Von Borries compound
last changed: 05/2023
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) class F6
United States | 1929 | 22 produced
F6 No. 128, the original No. 6403, was in service until February 1954
F6 No. 128, the original No. 6403, was in service until February 1954
collection Taylor Rush

The first Hudsons of the Milwaukee Road were built by Baldwin between 1929 and 1931. While the first 14 locomotives were designated as class F6 and their running boards were broken above the air tank, the last eight were designated as F6a and had straight running boards. They were delivered with driving wheels with a diameter of 79 inches, which later increased to 80 inches due to thicker tires. The coffin feed water heater was apparently integrated into the smokebox for aesthetic reasons.

The boiler had a large firebox, which resulted in a load on the trailing bogie of around 53 tons. The express trains they hauled usually consisted of nine to ten cars, but often eleven to 14 cars and were occasionally even longer. With these trains, the 918-mile round trip between Minneapolis and Harlowton could be completed ten times in 30 days without any servicing stops. A lighter train covered a flat section of 65.6 miles at an average of 92.3 mph

General
Built1929-1931
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase40 ft 9 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Total wheelbase81 ft 7 in
Service weight380,220 lbs
Adhesive weight196,550 lbs
Total weight668,000 lbs
Axle load65,517 lbs
Water capacity15,000 us gal
Fuel capacity40,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,700 hp (2,759 kW)
Optimal speed52 mph
Starting effort45,250 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter80 in
Boiler pressure225 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 26 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area80 sq ft
Firebox area411 sq ft
Tube heating area3,794 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,205 sq ft
Superheater area1,815 sq ft
Total heating area6,020 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 11/2023
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) classes L1 and L2
United States | 1909 | 400 produced
L2-a No. 8200 in a Baldwin works photo
L2-a No. 8200 in a Baldwin works photo

The first Mikados on the Milwaukee Road consisted of 20 saturated class L1 locomotives built by the company's own shops in Milwaukee in 1909. They already had a combustion chamber and drivers with a diameter of 63 inches. From 1912 onwards the L2 class followed, 40 of which were built in their own shops. Another 115 came from ALCO-Brooks and 25 from ALCO-Schenectady. Baldwin delivered 100 of the L2-a and L2-b classes from 1920 and 1922, respectively, which had a longer combustion chamber and, in the case of the L2-b, a larger superheater. The first ones were decommissioned in the 1930s after they were replaced by more powerful freight locomotives. Basically, a large proportion survived into the fifties, including ten L1s that were later given a superheater

VariantL1L2L2-aL2-b
General
Built19091912-19141920-19211922-1923
ManufacturerBaldwinMilwaukee, ALCOBaldwin
Axle config2-8-2 (Mikado) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase35 ft 1 in35 ft 3 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase65 ft 8 in66 ft 8 in70 ft 6 1/2 in
Service weight260,500 lbs275,000 lbs289,000 lbs
Adhesive weight201,000 lbs216,500 lbs219,000 lbs
Total weight414,500 lbs431,000 lbs444,000 lbs469,000 lbs
Axle load56,300 lbs
Water capacity8,000 us gal8,500 us gal10,000 us gal
Fuel capacity28,000 lbs (coal)22,000 lbs (coal)24,000 lbs (coal)32,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,800 hp (1,342 kW)2,100 hp (1,566 kW)2,200 hp (1,641 kW)
Optimal speed25 mph24 mph26 mph
Starting effort46,629 lbf54,724 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 24 x 30 intwo, 26 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area48.8 sq ft49.1 sq ft48.8 sq ft
Firebox area282 sq ft258 sq ft310 sq ft311 sq ft
Tube heating area3,332 sq ft2,792 sq ft2,796 sq ft2,639 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,614 sq ft3,050 sq ft3,106 sq ft2,950 sq ft
Superheater area640 sq ft645 sq ft720 sq ft
Total heating area3,614 sq ft3,690 sq ft3,751 sq ft3,670 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 11/2023
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) class F3
United States | 1910 | 70 produced
No. 156 in October 1938 in Minneapolis, Minnesota
No. 156 in October 1938 in Minneapolis, Minnesota
collection Taylor Rush

Although the Milwaukee Road had already procured its first few Pacifics in 1893, the Atlantics had still to pull the fastest trains for the time being. However, when they got problems with trains of ten to 14 cars, the 70 class F3 Pacifics were ordered from ALCO in 1910. They were initially operated with saturated steam and were retrofitted with superheaters from 1920 onwards. The diameter of the cylinders was increased from 23 to 23.5 inches, and for six of them even to 24 inches.

No. 152 with retrofitted streamlining in November 1953 in Madison, Wisconsin
No. 152 with retrofitted streamlining in November 1953 in Madison, Wisconsin
collection Taylor Rush

The locomotives were considered very powerful and well balanced. If necessary, they could reach up to 90 mph or 145 km/h. It wasn't until 1940 and 1941, when the Milwaukee Road was already using Hudsons, that three were rebuilt into the F3-as. The grate was widened and its area was significantly increased, but the direct heating surface of the firebox only grew slightly. Two of them were given streamlined fairing to pull the “Chippewa”.

Variantas builtsuperheatedrebuilt F3-as
General
Built191019201940-1941
ManufacturerALCOMilwaukee
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase35 ft 7 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Total wheelbase67 ft 2 in67 ft 4 1/2 in
Service weight247,300 lbs263,866 lbs284,300 lbs
Adhesive weight157,200 lbs169,380 lbs191,400 lbs
Total weight385,300 lbs419,866 lbs440,300 lbs
Axle load52,400 lbs56,460 lbs63,800 lbs
Water capacity7,000 us gal8,500 us gal
Fuel capacity20,000 lbs (coal)22,000 lbs (coal)26,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,900 hp (1,417 kW)2,200 hp (1,641 kW)2,400 hp (1,790 kW)
Optimal speed38 mph42 mph46 mph
Starting effort31,874 lbf33,275 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter79 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 23 x 28 intwo, 23 1/2 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area48.8 sq ft59.8 sq ft
Firebox area266 sq ft275 sq ft
Tube heating area3,657 sq ft2,631 sq ft2,529 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,923 sq ft2,897 sq ft2,804 sq ft
Superheater area620 sq ft
Total heating area3,923 sq ft3,517 sq ft3,424 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
streamline
last changed: 03/2024
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) “James Toleman”
United States | 1893 | only one produced
The locomotive before changed to American standards
The locomotive before changed to American standards
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, October 1898

The “James Toleman” was developed by Frederick Charles Winby to test the installation of a long firebox between uncoupled axles. Each axle had its own power plant, with the inner cylinders driving the first driving axle. Thus one could do without long coupling rods. The boiler was oval in cross-section to fit between it large wheels. After attending the Columbian Exposition, she was given to the Milwaukee Road for trials. However, it quickly became apparent that she repeatedly had too little steam and parts regularly broke. Even a lengthy visit by Winby to the USA could not solve the problems that had arisen.

General
Built1893
ManufacturerHawthorn, Leslie & Co.
Axle config4-2-2-0 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight120,000 lbs
Adhesive weight70,000 lbs
Axle load35,000 lbs
Power
Power Plant
Driver diameter90 in
Boiler pressure175 psi
Cylindersfour, front: 17 x 22 in
rear: 16 1/2 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area28 sq ft
Firebox area182.6 sq ft
Tube heating area1,817.4 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,000 sq ft
Total heating area2,000 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
prototype
duplex
last changed: 07/2023
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) class A
United States | 1935 | 4 produced
No 2, which reached 112.5 mph at the first time with a dynaometer car
No 2, which reached 112.5 mph at the first time with a dynaometer car
Robert Graham / collection Taylor Rush

In order to increase average speeds in the fight against other railroads, the Milwaukee Road had ALCO build four class A streamlined locomotives from 1935 onwards. In order to save weight, not only particularly light passenger cars were developed for the “Hiawatha”. Weight was also saved on the locomotives by choosing the 4-4-2 wheel arrangement, which was no longer used in the USA by this time.

By only having two driving axles, the moving masses could be reduced. Furthermore, the first driving axle was driven, which led to shorter connecting rods. Additionally, a boiler pressure of 300 psi (20.7 bars) was used, allowing smaller cylinders with lighter pistons to be used. Despite only two cylinders and the imperfect mass balancing, high speeds could be achieved with seven-foot drivers.

Shortly after its delivery in May 1935, number two reached a speed of 112.5 mph (181 km/h), which could be counted as a world record thanks to the dynamometer car that was present. There are also unconfirmed reports of speeds in excess of 120 mph. What is undisputed, however, is that they were able to travel at sustained speeds in excess of 100 mph with their light trains.

The 422 miles from Chicago to St. Paul were to be completed in six and a half hours with eleven stops. In fact, the trains completed this route in six and a quarter hours. Even after the introduction of the more powerful class F7 Hudsons, they continued to pull the Hiawatha. Between 1949 and 1951 they were replaced by diesel locomotives.

General
Built1935-1937
ManufacturerALCO
Axle config4-4-2 (Atlantic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase36 ft 7 in
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase79 ft
Service weight286,000 lbs
Adhesive weight142,000 lbs
Total weight505,620 lbs
Axle load71,000 lbs
Water capacity13,000 us gal
Fuel capacity4,000 us gal (oil)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,500 hp (2,610 kW)
Optimal speed73 mph
Top speed110 mph
Starting effort30,685 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter84 in
Boiler pressure300 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 19 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area69 sq ft
Firebox area294 sq ft
Tube heating area2,951 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,245 sq ft
Superheater area1,029 sq ft
Total heating area4,274 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
streamline
last changed: 01/2024
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) classes S1 to S3
United States | 1930 | 52 produced
S-2 No. 202 in November 1937 in Bensenville, Illinois
S-2 No. 202 in November 1937 in Bensenville, Illinois
collection Taylor Rush

The history of the 4-8-4 at Milwaukee Road began in 1930 with the single number 9700, which later became the 250, and was supplied by Baldwin. Its power was guaranteed by a boiler with a combustion chamber, thermic syphons, arch tubes and a coffin feed water heater. Since the 4-6-4 class F6 was sufficient for the express trains of the time, it initially remained a one-off and was used in front of freight trains weighing up to 5,000 tons. It was only when the express trains became increasingly heavier that the 250 was used for this purpose.

It was not until 1938 that the Milwaukee Road manufactured the 251 in their own shops, which was a copy of the 250 and together with it formed the class S1. As early as 1937, Baldwin had started producing the 40 class S2 locomotives, which had some changes compared to the S1 and was more powerful, not least due to the boiler pressure of 285 psi. During the Second World War, ALCO built ten S3 which had a smaller boiler with only 250 psi and did not have much in common with the S1 and S2 in terms of design. Today only the two S3 numbered 261 and 265 still exist, the former of which is operational.

VariantS1S2S3
General
Built1930, 19381937-1938, 19401943
ManufacturerBaldwin, MilwaukeeBaldwinALCO
Axle config4-8-4 (Northern) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase46 ft 3 in47 ft 4 in46 ft 7 in
Fixed wheelbase19 ft 9 in19 ft 3 in19 ft 9 in
Total wheelbase88 ft 4 in92 ft 0 1/2 in95 ft 6 1/2 in
Service weight450,840 lbs490,450 lbs460,000 lbs
Adhesive weight258,818 lbs282,320 lbs259,300 lbs
Total weight740,009 lbs813,450 lbs824,100 lbs
Axle load65,136 lbs
Water capacity15,000 us gal20,000 us gal
Fuel capacity40,000 lbs (coal)50,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,650 hp (3,468 kW)5,300 hp (3,952 kW)4,700 hp (3,505 kW)
Optimal speed48 mph
Starting effort62,137 lbf70,816 lbf62,119 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter74 in
Boiler pressure230 psi285 psi250 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 28 x 30 intwo, 26 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area103 sq ft106 sq ft96.2 sq ft
Firebox area549 sq ft578 sq ft505.5 sq ft
Tube heating area4,851 sq ft4,931 sq ft3,972.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area5,400 sq ft5,509 sq ft4,478 sq ft
Superheater area2,403 sq ft2,336 sq ft1,438 sq ft
Total heating area7,803 sq ft7,845 sq ft5,916 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
express
last changed: 02/2024
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