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Wehrmacht Diesel Locomotives and Successors[Inhalt]
From the Wehrmacht to the Industrial Railway
WR 360 C 14 as V 36 123 of the Dampfbahn Fränkische Schweiz with an elevated cab
WR 360 C 14 as V 36 123 of the Dampfbahn Fränkische Schweiz with an elevated cab
Vámos Sándor

In the 1930s, when the Wehrmacht underwent major rearmament, first secretly and later openly, there was a need for various locomotives for use on the track systems, which were maintained directly by the Wehrmacht. This mainly concerned ammunition and fuel depots, training areas and airfields. In this environment, steam locomotives proved to be unsuitable for two reasons: on the one hand, flying sparks and embers posed a risk of explosion and, on the other hand, in the event of war the steam plume of a steam locomotive could be spotted from a great distance. Although there were already fireless locomotives, these were only suitable for industrial companies in which larger excess amounts of steam were available. So the choice fell on diesel locomotives, even if the development here was still in its infancy.

At that time, diesel engines had already been introduced to aviation as sophisticated, supercharged two-stroke engines, and even the slow-running, simply constructed naturally aspirated engines had now developed sufficient performance. It was the latter that were suitable for low-maintenance, uncomplicated use in shunting locomotives. Although there was still no agreement on the most suitable form of power transmission for large diesel locomotives, hydraulic power transmission proved to be suitable in the targeted power classes of the shunting locomotives. For this purpose, the Voith company from Heidenheim an der Brenz developed a torque converter transmission that also enabled several gears to be shifted for the optimum traction and speed in each case.

Two two-axle locomotives with an output of 200 and 360 hp each had now been developed. Both had a cab at the rear end and a narrower hood for the machinery. Some of the engines got an adapted exhaust system with additional explosion protection. The gearbox drove a jackshaft, which was located between the wheelsets and drove them via coupling rods. Since the axle load of the more powerful locomotive had become too high for some areas of application, it was converted into a three-axle one. A four-axle variant was later developed, but only three prototypes were produced.

WR 550 D 14 as armored railcar Pz.Tr.Wg. 16 in the Museum in Warsaw
WR 550 D 14 as armored railcar Pz.Tr.Wg. 16 in the Museum in Warsaw
Rav3390

In addition to these three standard models, a locomotive with two or three axles was also developed, known as the WR 220, which, however, differed from the others with a mechanical power transmission. The double locomotives of type D 311, which had electric power transmission and were intended for pulling railway guns, were significantly more powerful. At the other end of the performance scale, a few Heeresfeldbahn locomotives were developed, some of which were designed for use in trenches on the frontline and were built for gauges between 600 mm (nearly 2 feet) and 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in). Large diesel locomotives based on the diesel-hydraulic standard gauge locomotives were developed but not built.

After the end of the war, some of the companies involved in the production of Wehrmacht diesel locomotives made more examples or, like Henschel, introduced new types that were very similar to the old models. Soon after, several West German companies created a new generation of locomotives that followed new standards, especially in terms of appearance and the arrangement of the machinery, but technically took over a lot from the old models. They all had the following features in common: a cab at the rear end of the locomotive or shifted slightly towards the middle, a large front hood and either a small or no rear hood for the machinery, hydraulic transmission from Voith with mostly two gears, a jackshaft, transmission via coupling rods and two to four axles, all of which were mounted in the frame. Most manufacturers gave their locomotives designations like these of the prototypes, which indicated the installed engine power in hp

Just as none of the Wehrmacht locomotives found their way to the Reichsbahn, almost no post-war models were delivered directly to the Bundesbahn. An exception was the V 65, which was derived from the MaK 650 D. Most locomotives came to private operators, mostly either small and district railways or industrial companies. The latter found many buyers, especially in the mining industry, since compact, high-power shunting locomotives were required there. The mostly very robustly built locomotives also found export customers in the Third World, but state railways from Europe could also be won as customers. Many of the locomotives lived for many decades and were used well into the 21st century, some with new engines. Even today, not only are many samples still preserved, some still regularly pull museum trains and a few even have to earn money somewhere in the world.

Wehrmacht Locomotive WR 200 B 14
German Reichsbahn V 20, German Federal Railway class 270 and Austrian Federal Railways (BBÖ) class 2061
Germany | 1938 | 129 produced
V 20 022 of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft historische Eisenbahn e.V.
V 20 022 of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft historische Eisenbahn e.V.
Torsten Bätge

The WR 200 B 14 was the smallest of the standard Wehrmacht locomotives and, with 129 units, not quite as common as its three-axle sister. The designation stands for “Wehrmachtslokomotive standard gauge, 200 hp, wheel arrangement B, 14 tonnes axle load”. It is also known under the designation V 20, which it received from the two German railways after the war. The locomotives were never used by the Reichsbahn before the end of the war because they were directly assigned to the Wehrmacht.

Characteristic of her appearance was the driver's cab at the rear end and the high hood, which contained all the machinery and was provided with several flaps for access to the engine room. Compared to the later V 36, the body was lower overall and the entire two-axle locomotive was over a meter shorter. Various six-cylinder in-line engines from Deutz, the Mannheim Motor Works or MAN provided the drive. The power was transmitted via a hydraulic transmission to a jackshaft between the axles, which in turn drove the wheel sets via coupling rods. A coke oven was installed for starting at low temperatures.

After the war, not many examples made it into state railway service and only 23 locomotives remained in service with the Bundesbahn, four with the Reichsbahn and one with the ÖBB. While the DB only removed the coke ovens, the DR machines got new engines with the same power. Today some are still preserved and partly also operational.

General
Built1938-1943
ManufacturerBMAG, Deutz, Gmeinder, Jung, DWK
Axle configB 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length26 ft 2 15/16 in
Wheelbase10 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase10 ft 6 in
Service weight57,320 lbs
Adhesive weight57,320 lbs
Axle load28,660 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-hydraulic
Top speed34 mph
EngineDeutz A6M 324, MWM RHS 326 S, MAN W 6 V17,5/22
Engine type6-cyl. diesel
Engine output197 hp (147 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
switcher
war locomotive
last changed: 03/2022
Wehrmacht Locomotive WR 220
German Reichsbahn V 22 and German Federal Railway class 270
Germany | 1936 | 44 produced

The Wehrmacht locomotive that stood out alongside its sisters with 200 and 360 hp was the WR 220. It was ordered by the Luftwaffe and, unlike the others, had mechanical power transmission. There was a two- and a three-axle variant, designated WR 220 B and WR 220 C, respectively. The two-axle had an wheelbase of 2.90 meters and the jackshaft was located between the axles. With the three-axle, the overall wheelbase was only five centimeters longer and the jackshaft was in the narrower space between the second and third axles. The wheel diameter was five centimeters smaller here, but whether this was only chosen to accommodate the third axle or for other reasons can only be guessed at. Compared to the WR 220, both were slightly shorter and had a larger cab.

After the war, the Bundesbahn took over nine two-axle and five three-axle vehicles, which were classified as V 22 according to their output. Since these locomotives differed from the V 20, which was available in large numbers, an adaptation was sought. This was implemented on all two-axle vehicles between 1951 and 1953 by installing a new engine and hydraulic transmission. In 1968, these were even given computer numbers with the class 270 and were used from then on for about ten years. One of the three-axle locomotives was converted to two axles. However, since this apparently did not deliver satisfactory results, the other three-axle vehicles were retired until 1951.

VariantWR 220 BWR 220 C
General
Built1936
ManufacturerDWK
Axle configB C 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length25 ft 3 1/8 in
Wheelbase9 ft 6 3/16 in
Fixed wheelbase9 ft 6 3/16 in
Service weight66,139 lbs83,776 lbs
Adhesive weight66,139 lbs83,776 lbs
Axle load26,455 lbs35,274 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-mechanic
Top speed25 mph
EngineDWK 6 M 241
Engine type6-cyl. diesel
Fuel79 us gal (diesel)
Engine output216 hp (161 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
switcher
war locomotive
last changed: 04/2022
Wehrmacht Locomotive WR 360 C 14
German Federal Railway V 36, German Federal Railway class 236 and German Reichsbahn class 103
Germany | 1937 | 279 produced
V 36 406 (Historic Railway Frankfurt) in May 2005
V 36 406 (Historic Railway Frankfurt) in May 2005
Hans-Peter Scholz

The WR 360 C 14 was the Wehrmacht's most well-known diesel locomotive and was built in the largest numbers. The original designation stood for “Wehrmachtslokomotive Regelspur, 360 HP, wheel arrangement C, 14 tonnes axle load”. However, the name V 36, under which it was used on both sides of the inner-German border after the war, is more familiar to the public.

It was powered by a six-cylinder in-line engine with 360 hp. This did not require turbocharging and drew its power from a displacement of 98 liters, which reduced production costs and minimized technical defects even under difficult operating conditions. Most examples used a multi-speed hydraulic gearbox to transfer power to the jackshaft, but some also used a mechanical gearbox. The production of the WR 360 C 14 comprised a total of around 280 units, some of which remained in other countries after the war. In Germany, 42 pieces went to the Reichsbahn and almost 100 to the Bundesbahn. Further examples were also built after the war, and new types of diesel locomotives were created primarily for private and works railways, which were more or less based on this model.

In the Bundesbahn, the V 36 was not only used for shunting, but often also on secondary lines with passenger trains. Since the poor visibility due to the high hood proved to be a disadvantage when used on the line, conversions were also made. The best known was a tower on the driver's cab roof, with the driver standing on the driver's desk and having a better view of the route. A completely new high cab was built for the V 36 238, but this was the only example. Some V 36s were also modified with regard to the controls. In order to allow push-pull operation with control cars from multiple units, a number of machines were given push-pull control. Systems were initially used that required an additional man on the locomotive and only later variants were suitable for one-man operation. In addition, some locomotives were given multiple controls so that two V 36s could be coupled together at the cabs and manned by one driver.

V 36 123 of the Franconian Switzerland steam railway with a tower cab in October 2016 in Muggendorf
V 36 123 of the Franconian Switzerland steam railway with a tower cab in October 2016 in Muggendorf
Reinhold Möller

When the changeover to computer numbers was made, V 36s were still existing in both German states. Since 1968 they have been known as class 236 in the Bundesbahn and as class 103 in the Reichsbahn since 1970. The former was phased out in the 1970s, the latter in the 1980s. Today there are several locomotives, some of which are roadworthy and some of which are used regularly.

VariantV 360V 364
General
Built1937-19441950
ManufacturerO&K, BMAG, Deutz, Jung, Henschel, DWK, Krupp, Holmag, MaK
Axle configC 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length30 ft 2 3/16 in30 ft 3 3/4 in
Wheelbase12 ft 11 1/2 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 11 1/2 in
Service weight85,980 lbs94,799 lbs
Adhesive weight85,980 lbs94,799 lbs
Axle load29,762 lbs31,967 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-hydraulic
Top speed37 mph
Starting effort28,551 lbf31,473 lbf
EngineMWM RHS 235 S
Engine type6-cyl. diesel
Fuel396 us gal (diesel)
Engine output355 hp (265 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
switcher
war locomotive
last changed: 03/2022
Wehrmacht Locomotive WR 550 D 14
Germany | 1941 | 3 produced
Factory photo by Voith
Factory photo by Voith

The WR 550 D 14 was built as the largest of the Wehrmacht locomotives, which had four axles and an engine power of 550 hp. In terms of appearance, it largely corresponded to its three-axle sister, but was 1.5 meters longer and looked a bit beefier, mainly because of the thicker frame. The biggest difference was that the four wheel sets were all closely spaced and the jackshaft was at the rear end instead of in the middle. As with the WR 200 B 14, slightly different versions with different engines were planned depending on the manufacturer. These were the BMAG version with a six-cylinder MWM engine, the O&K version with a six-cylinder from MAN and the Deutz version with their own eight-cylinder.

Due to the bottlenecks during the war, only one example of each of the three types was produced. Two of them fell into British hands during the war in North Africa and were scrapped after a few years of further use. The O&K locomotive was a special case, which was converted to the so-called “Panzertriebwagen Pz.TR.Wg. 16” (tank railcar) in 1943. For this purpose, the locomotive was completely encased in armor and an armored trailer with four axles was attached to both ends. A rotating turret with a cannon was installed on each of these carriages, there are also photos with anti-aircraft quadruplets. The vehicle came to Poland after the war and was allegedly used there against insurgents. Today it can be seen in Warsaw in the Railway Museum.

General
Built1941-1942
ManufacturerBMAG, O&K, Deutz
Axle configD 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length35 ft 1 1/4 in
Wheelbase13 ft 3 7/16 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 3 7/16 in
Service weight123,459 lbs
Adhesive weight123,459 lbs
Axle load30,865 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-hydraulic
Top speed37 mph
EngineMWM RS 38 S, MAN W 6 V 30/38, Deutz V 8 M 536
Engine type6-cyl. diesel, 8-cyl. diesel
Engine output543 hp (405 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
switcher
war locomotive
last changed: 03/2022
Wehrmacht Locomotive D 311
German Federal Railway V 188 and class 288
Germany | 1940 | 4 produced
V 188 001 in July 1967 in Bamberg
V 188 001 in July 1967 in Bamberg
Karl-Friedrich Seitz

The Wehrmacht procured four diesel-electric double locomotives, which were to transport the gigantic 80 cm guns to their place of use and align them in position. These guns weighed 1,350 tonnes and required several trains to transport them. Although four double locomotives were planned, only two were completed, of which only one was actually used.

The guns were not railway guns in the true sense of the word, but rather stationary, which were only transported by rail and had to be set up on site. There, the crews of several construction trains created a spacious position with a double-track curved track to align the cannon. Although the fine alignment was done by electric motors under their own power, the locomotives were needed to move them on the curve of the track. Two of these double locomotives were provided for this purpose, which, thanks to their electrical power transmission, could also supply the current for the gun.

Each half had a six-cylinder in-line MAN engine that produced 691 kW (940 hp). Each of the four axles mounted in a frame had its own nose-suspended motor. A maximum speed of 75 km/h could be reached for transport to the position or other journeys.

After the locomotives were only rarely used during the war, the Bundesbahn subsequently took over two double units in their fleet and kept a third as a spare parts donor. In order to improve performance in freight transport, two Maybach V12s, each with 808 kW, were installed, as they were also used in the modern V 200. The locomotives were given the same red paintwork as the new-build locomotives and, according to the applicable scheme, were designated V 188 due to their original 1,880 hp total output. With the new scheme of 1968, they became the class 288, but the first locomotive was retired in 1969 and was not given a new number. The original D 311 04 and later V 188 02 a+b was renumbered 288 002 and was kept in stock until the beginning of June 1972.

Variantas builtrebuilt
General
Built1940-1941
ManufacturerKrupp, SSW
Axle configD+D 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length73 ft 10 1/4 in
Fixed wheelbase19 ft 8 1/4 in
Service weight324,079 lbs
Adhesive weight324,079 lbs
Axle load39,683 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-electric
Top speed47 mph
Starting effort80,931 lbf
EngineMANMaybach MD 650
Engine type2x 6-cyl. diese12x V12 diesel
Engine output1,855 hp (1,383 kW)2,167 hp (1,616 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
freight
war locomotive
last changed: 03/2022
Henschel DH 240
Germany | 1952 | 14 produced
DH 240 of the Hespertalbahn in the Bochum-Dahlhausen Railway Museum
DH 240 of the Hespertalbahn in the Bochum-Dahlhausen Railway Museum
MPW57

After the Second World War, Henschel offered shunting locomotives for industrial companies that were similar to the Wehrmacht locomotives such as the WR 200 B 14 and the WR 360 C 14 except for a few details. From 1954 locomotives of the so-called second post-war generation emerged, which attracted attention with their modern-looking exterior with many curves. As with competing products, the cab was moved slightly to the middle and raised compared to the hoods in order to improve visibility in both directions.

The smallest variant was the DH 240 with only two axles, whose designation suggests an engine output of 240 hp. That power came from a small eight-cylinder, 22-litre, turbocharged engine from Motorenwerke Mannheim, mated to a Voith torque converter driving a jackshaft. The wheel sets were then driven via coupling rods

A total of 14 pieces were originally delivered to several industrial and mining companies. After many years of service with their original operators, some locomotives were sold abroad.

General
Built1952-1957
ManufacturerHenschel
Axle configB 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length24 ft 8 7/8 in
Service weight61,729 lbs
Adhesive weight61,729 lbs
Axle load30,865 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-hydraulic
Top speed37 mph
EngineMWM RHS 518A
Engine type8-cyl. diesel
Fuel108 us gal (diesel)
Engine output237 hp (177 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
switcher
industry
last changed: 03/2022
Henschel DH 360 Ca and DH 500 Ca
Germany | 1958 | 107 produced
DH 500 Ca, formerly Adam Opel AG, in the Bochum-Dahlhausen Railway Museum
DH 500 Ca, formerly Adam Opel AG, in the Bochum-Dahlhausen Railway Museum
Manfred Kopka

The third post-war generation of Henschel shunting locomotives was based directly on the second, but used a larger number of standardized assemblies. There were again two- to four-axle locomotives, the engine power of which sometimes overlapped and made it necessary to include the wheel arrangement in the designation.

The DH 360 Ca and DH 500 Ca models were therefore three-axle locomotives with 360 and 500 hp respectively. The weaker variant used a V12 diesel from Henschel that was not turbocharged. The variant with 500 hp received the Mercedes-Benz MB 836 Bb, which already powered the previous series. Overall, the third-generation locomotives were available with 120 to 850 hp, with the three-axle models later also being offered with 700 hp

No locomotives of this generation were delivered to the Bundesbahn ex works and customers were primarily found in the mining industry. The DH 500 Ca also found customers in Spain, Switzerland, Norway, Sudan and Ghana. A total of 18 DH 360 Ca and 89 DH 500 Ca were built.

VariantDH 360 CaDH 500 Ca
General
Built1958-19641959-1971
ManufacturerHenschel
Axle configC 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length29 ft 2 3/8 in
Service weight119,049 lbs
Adhesive weight119,049 lbs
Axle load39,683 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-hydraulic
Top speed37 mph
EngineHenschel 12 V 1416Mercedes-Benz MB 836 Bb
Engine typeV12 diesel6-cyl. diesel
Fuel291 us gal (diesel)
Engine output355 hp (265 kW)493 hp (368 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
switcher
industry
last changed: 03/2022
Henschel DH 440 and DH 500
Germany | 1955 | 19 produced
DH 440 of the RWE power plant Frimmersdorf in the Rhenish Industrial Railway Museum
DH 440 of the RWE power plant Frimmersdorf in the Rhenish Industrial Railway Museum
MPW57

The three-axle models of the second Henschel post-war generation started with the DH 390 and shortly afterwards the weaker DH 360. Soon the engine power was increased to 440 and finally 500 hp thanks to new engines. The engine used in the DH 440 was the MAN W 8 V 17.5/22 A with a displacement of 42 liters and eight cylinders, which reached its rated output at 1,100 rpm. The DH 500, on the other hand, received the Mercedes-Benz MB 836 Bb with a displacement of just under 30 liters from six cylinders, which, however, with 1,500 rpm was already one of the high-speed engines and was turbocharged

The DH 440 only reached a quantity of six, half of which went to various companies and half to the Danish State Railways. However, the latter had 120 copies built by Frichs as MH (II) without licensing. The DH 500 was offered from 1956 as a „Hüttenlok” (smelter locomotive) because it was a suitable locomotive for the narrow tracks of the metallurgical works with sufficient power for the heavy loads. This was partly thanks to the shorter overall length due to the smaller engine. It could anticipate some improvements that led to the DH 500 Ca from Henschel's third generation.

VariantDH 440DH 500
General
Built1956-19581955-1956
ManufacturerHenschel
Axle configC 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length30 ft 11 5/8 in27 ft 2 3/4 in
Service weight89,287 lbs119,049 lbs
Adhesive weight89,287 lbs119,049 lbs
Axle load30,865 lbs39,683 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-hydraulic
Top speed37 mph
EngineMAN W 8 V 17,5/22 AMercedes-Benz MB 836 Bb
Engine type8-cyl. diesel6-cyl. diesel
Fuel291 us gal (diesel)
Engine output434 hp (324 kW)493 hp (368 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
switcher
industry
last changed: 03/2022
Jung R 42 C
Germany | 1955 | 32 produced
R 42 C of the Bundeswehr in the Vossloh Service Center in Moers
R 42 C of the Bundeswehr in the Vossloh Service Center in Moers
MPW57

The Arnold Jung Lokomotivfabrik also offered some diesel-hydraulic shunting locomotives in the 1950s, which were based on the Wehrmacht diesel locomotives. Two-axle vehicles with 300 hp, three-axle vehicles with 300, 400 and 440 hp and a four-axle vehicle with 600 hp were available. The designation of these locomotives consisted of an R for “shunting locomotive”, a number that indicated the approximate horsepower in tens and the letter B, C or D for the number of axles. There were also the RK 12 B and RK 20 B with chain drive. Although these were the first successful young diesel locomotives of the post-war period, the manufacturer referred to these locomotives as the “third generation” with regard to the former models from earlier times.

The R 42 C was the most successful variant of the series with 29 units. In reality, it had an output of 440 hp, which came from an eight-cylinder in-line MAN engine. This was the same engine like that used in the competing 440 hp Henschel and Krauss-Maffei locomotives. The Bundeswehr was the largest customer with seven vehicles. In contrast to their competitors, the young locomotives found fewer sales in industrial companies and were used more often on light and district railways.

General
Built1955-1962
ManufacturerJung
Axle configC 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length30 ft 5 9/16 in
Wheelbase11 ft 1 7/8 in
Fixed wheelbase11 ft 1 7/8 in
Service weight99,208 lbs
Adhesive weight99,208 lbs
Axle load33,069 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-hydraulic
Top speed37 mph
EngineMAN W 8 V 17,5/22 A
Engine type8-cyl. diesel
Fuel217 us gal (diesel)
Engine output434 hp (324 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
switcher
industry
last changed: 03/2022
Klöckner-Humboldt-Deutz T4M 525 R and T4M 625 R
Germany | 1953 | 101 produced
T4M 625 R of the Bossel–Blankenstein light railway at the Hamm museum railway
T4M 625 R of the Bossel–Blankenstein light railway at the Hamm museum railway
Stefan Kunzmann /

After the three-axle six-cylinder models based on the WR 360 C 14, KHD developed the two-axle models of the T4M series. While four-stroke in-line engines had previously been installed, two-stroke engines in a V design were now used. These were not only lighter than their predecessors, but also saved quite a bit of height. This allowed the hood to be flatter, which significantly improved the driver's view. With 225 hp, the engine of the fifth generation was already more powerful than in the two-axle Wehrmacht locomotive and this was increased again in the sixth generation to between 240 and 260 hp. The use of the same designations for the locomotive and engine soon turned out to be a marketing problem when some T4M 525 R model locomotives were built with engines of the sixth generation. The locomotives were still sold as T4M 525 R, but the engine was now called T4M 625 R and led to confusion with the more powerful locomotive.

Nevertheless, a total of 25 pieces of the weaker and 76 pieces of the stronger variant were sold. Within Germany, six locomotives could again be sold to the British Army of the Rhine, while most customers only bought a smaller number or even individual locomotives. In addition to these locomotives with four-cylinder engines, the three-axle T6M 625 R with 400 hp and the T8M 625 R with 530 hp were also built, in which the same V-engines with six and eight cylinders werde used. With them, the driver's cab was not at the very end, as there was still a smaller hood behind it. Of them, however, only eleven and two pieces were made.

41 of the T4M 625 R found their customers at various operators in Sweden. Most of them ended up with the state railway SJ and were given either the designation Z6 or Z64. Towards the end of the 1970s they not only received 272 hp Scania engines, but also revised and soundproof cabs. Only in the 1990s were the latter transferred to lower-value services and later mostly resold.

VariantT4M 525 RT4M 625 R
General
Built1953-19551953-1961
ManufacturerKHD
Axle configB 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length24 ft 2 3/16 in
Wheelbase8 ft 8 5/16 in
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 8 5/16 in
Service weight61,729 lbs
Adhesive weight61,729 lbs
Axle load30,865 lbs
Power
Power sourcediesel-hydraulic
Top speed31 mph
EngineKHD T4M 525 RKHD T4M 625 R
Engine typeV4 diesel
Fuel79 us gal (diesel)
Engine output223 hp (166 kW)256 hp (191 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
diesel locomotive
switcher
industry
last changed: 03/2022
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