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Steam Locomotives of the Canadian Pacific (CP)[Inhalt]
Canadian Pacific No. 283
Canada | 1883 | only one produced
No. 283 decorated for the funeral train of Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald
No. 283 decorated for the funeral train of Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald
Library and archivees Canada / C-007127

Number 283 was a 4-4-0 locomotive, of which no class designation is known today. Built in 1883 by the Hinkley Locomotive Works, it had 62-inch diameter coupled wheels. It is said to have been used generally in front of passenger and freight trains.

It is best known for drawing the funeral train of Canadian Prime Minister John A. Macdonald. This was pulled on June 10, 1891 through Ontario from Ottawa to Kingston. The photo shows it decorated for the occasion. The 283 was eventually scrapped in 1897.

General
Built1883
ManufacturerHinkley
Axle config4-4-0 (American) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power400 hp (298 kW)
Power Plant
Driver diameter62 in
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 x 24 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
last changed: 04/2023
Canadian Pacific No. 371 to 378
Canada | 1886 | 8 produced

The Locomotives numbered 371 through 378 were built in 1886 by the CPR's own Montreal workshops. Their area of application was the transcontinental railroad opened in 1887 on the section to the Pacific coast near Vancouver. Originally they had 69 inch drivers which were later reduced to 62 inches. It was number 374 that brought the first passenger train to Vancouver on May 23, 1887. While the rest of the class was retired between 1915 and 1929, the 374 was rebuilt in 1914 and served until 1945. It was then restored to its original condition, with modern components removed and the locomotive no longer operational. Today, the 374 resides in a pavilion in Vancouver.

General
Built1886
ManufacturerMontreal
Axle config4-4-0 (American) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight115,000 lbs
Adhesive weight71,000 lbs
Axle load35,500 lbs
Fuel capacitywood
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power600 hp (447 kW)
Optimal speed28 mph
Starting effort13,671 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure160 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 x 24 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
Francis R.F. Brown
last changed: 07/2023
Canadian Pacific class D10
Canada | 1905 | 507 produced
D10g No. 1074 in Magog, Quebec
D10g No. 1074 in Magog, Quebec

The class D10 referred to a series of ten-wheelers of the Canadian Pacific, which, with a total number of 507, were widely used throughout Canada. They were simple in construction and easy to maintain, but had a larger boiler than ten-wheelers of the 19th century and a superheater. The first locomotives were built as camelbacks, but were rebuilt after about two years. Unlike most locomotives in Canada, they did not have a completely enclosed cab.

No. 784 in its original form as Camelback
No. 784 in its original form as Camelback
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, January 1906

There were the subclasses D10a to D10k, which also showed differences within a subclass. Basically they all used the same firebox, but different numbers of tubes and different superheaters. The driver diameter was 63 inches and the stroke of the cylinders was always 28 inches. For cylinder diameter and boiler pressure, either the combination of 22.5 inches and 180 psi or smaller cylinders with 21 inches and a boiler pressure increased to 200 psi were used. By installing arch tubes in the firebox, its heating surface later increased. The retirements took place between 1938 and 1965.

VariantD10a, b, cD10dD10e, fD10g, h, j
General
Built1905-1913
ManufacturerCLC, Montreal, CPR, ALCO
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase26 ft 1 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 10 in
Total wheelbase56 ft 4 in
Service weight190,000 lbs205,000 lbs
Adhesive weight141,000 lbs156,000 lbs
Total weight317,000 lbs354,000 lbs
Axle load47,000 lbs52,000 lbs
Water capacity24,000 us gal
Fuel capacitycoal6,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,700 hp (1,268 kW)1,650 hp (1,230 kW)1,700 hp (1,268 kW)1,750 hp (1,305 kW)
Optimal speed33 mph31 mph33 mph
Top speed65 mph
Starting effort33,320 lbf34,425 lbf33,320 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure200 psi180 psi200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 21 x 28 intwo, 22 1/2 x 28 intwo, 21 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area49 sq ft
Firebox area180 sq ft209 sq ft
Tube heating area2,233 sq ft2,209 sq ft2,100 sq ft2,022 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,413 sq ft2,418 sq ft2,309 sq ft2,231 sq ft
Superheater area374 sq ft408 sq ft472 sq ft488 sq ft
Total heating area2,787 sq ft2,826 sq ft2,781 sq ft2,719 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
camelback
last changed: 11/2023
Canadian Pacific class G3
Canada | 1919 | 171 produced
The surviving G3c No. 2317 in 1989
The surviving G3c No. 2317 in 1989
Mark Harrell / US Parks Service

After the First World War, the Canadian Pacific realized that a significantly more powerful Pacific was needed for the new, six-axle heavyweight passenger cars. Chief engineer William H. Winterrowd then developed the class G3 with a driving wheel diameter of 75 inches, which was intended for the flatter routes. A total of 26 examples of the G3a, b and c variants, which were almost identical in construction, were completed by 1923.

In 1926, 25 examples of the G3d followed, the most important innovation of which was a boiler made of nickel steel. This allowed the boiler pressure to be increased from 200 psi (13.8 bars) to 250 psi (17.2 bars). Although the cylinders were made smaller at the same time, the starting tractive effort could be increased.

Twelve years later, the 27 examples of the G3e and f followed, which in turn benefited from new advances in boiler construction and now had a boiler pressure of 275 psi (19 bars). The cylinder diameter was reduced again, while the starting tractive effort remained about the same. The G3g, h and j reached the largest number with 93, which only followed in the forties and were almost identical to the series e and f in terms of the engine. However, they had a boiler with fewer tubes and were used with smaller tenders. They were real multi-purpose locomotives and were also used in front of freight trains.

Although it was precisely the later variants that came up at a time when other railways had already switched to 4-6-4 or 4-8-4, they were relatively strong compared to other Pacifics and had a better ratio of adhesive to service weight than other locomotives and had less of a tendency to slip. The period of use ended in 1959, when there were already enough diesel locomotives for their area of operation. Today only number 2317 still exists, which belongs to class G3c.

VariantG3a to cG3dG3e and fG3g, h and j
General
Built1919-192319261938, 19401942-1945, 1948
ManufacturerAngus ShopsMontreal Locomotive WorksCanadian Locomotive Co.Canadian Locomotive Co., Montreal Locomotive Works
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase34 ft 6 in35 ft
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 2 in
Service weight299,000 lbs306,500 lbs321,000 lbs323,000 lbs
Adhesive weight181,500 lbs183,900 lbs198,000 lbs199,600 lbs
Total weight477,000 lbs544,500 lbs543,000 lbs519,760 lbs
Power
Power Plant
Driver diameter75 in
Boiler pressure200 psi250 psi275 psi
Cylinderstwo, 25 x 30 intwo, 23 x 30 intwo, 22 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area65 sq ft
Firebox area297.6 sq ft291 sq ft
Tube heating area3,232.4 sq ft2,982 sq ft3,207 sq ft2,885 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,530 sq ft3,273 sq ft3,498 sq ft3,176 sq ft
Superheater area803 sq ft864 sq ft1,473 sq ft1,475 sq ft
Total heating area4,333 sq ft4,137 sq ft4,971 sq ft4,651 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
last changed: 06/2022
Canadian Pacific class G5
Canada | 1946 | 102 produced
Contemporary photo of No. 1201, still in existence today
Contemporary photo of No. 1201, still in existence today
collection Ralph Currie

Starting in 1946, the Canadian Pacific had class G5 Pacific locomotives built for use on branch lines. With a adhesive weight of only 151.000 pounds, these had a low axle load by North American standards. Contrary to the field of application of most locomotives with this wheel arrangement, they were intended for use in front of passenger and freight trains, which was also noticeable in the driving wheel diameter of 70 inches.

From an initially planned number of 600, only 102 were finally built, as more and more diesel locomotives were put into service. For the same reason, only ten years after the end of production, the first examples were retired and in 1960 the last ones disappeared. Today there are still six that are currently only on static display, but could possibly be made operational again.

General
Built1946-1948
ManufacturerMontreal Locomotive Works, Canadian Locomotive Co.
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length76 ft 4 1/8 in
Wheelbase33 ft 7 1/2 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft
Service weight229,500 lbs
Adhesive weight151,000 lbs
Total weight420,500 lbs
Axle load50,333 lbs
Water capacity9,600 us gal
Fuel capacity28,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power2,750 hp (2,051 kW)
Optimal speed52 mph
Top speed85 mph
Starting effort34,000 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter70 in
Boiler pressure250 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 20 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area45.6 sq ft
Firebox area199 sq ft
Tube heating area2,377 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,576 sq ft
Superheater area744 sq ft
Total heating area3,320 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
last changed: 06/2022
Canadian Pacific class H1 “Royal Hudson”
Canada | 1929 | 65 produced
H1a No. 2804
H1a No. 2804
collection Taylor Rush
H1b No. 2816 in September 2007 in Milwaukee
H1b No. 2816 in September 2007 in Milwaukee
Brian Cazel

The 65 class H1a to H1e locomotives were built for use in front of express and freight trains. Starting with the H1c, they received partial streamlined fairing. After King George VI's train was pulled by an H1d on his visit to Canada in 1939, all streamlined Hudsons were officially allowed to call themselves “Royal Hudson”. The five H1s built in 1940 finally had oil firing. They were replaced by diesel locomotives by 1960 and some continued to run excursion trips for a longer period of time.

VariantH1a, bH1c, dH1e
General
Built1929-19301937-19381940
ManufacturerMontreal Locomotive Works
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase39 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 2 in
Total wheelbase80 ft 6 in80 ft 10 1/2 in
Service weight351,200 lbs354,000 lbs366,000 lbs
Adhesive weight183,800 lbs186,800 lbs194,000 lbs
Total weight643,100 lbs649,000 lbs
Water capacity14,400 us gal
Fuel capacity42,000 lbs (coal)5,400 us gal (oil)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,100 hp (3,057 kW)4,200 hp (3,132 kW)
Optimal speed58 mph59 mph
Starting effort45,254 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter75 in
Boiler pressure275 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 22 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area80.8 sq ft
Firebox area352 sq ft326 sq ft
Tube heating area3,482 sq ft3,465 sq ft3,466 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,834 sq ft3,791 sq ft3,792 sq ft
Superheater area1,640 sq ft1,542 sq ft
Total heating area5,474 sq ft5,431 sq ft5,334 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 03/2023
Canadian Pacific class T1 “Selkirk”
Canada | 1929 | 36 produced
No. 5927 refueling in South Edmonton in the summer of 1957
No. 5927 refueling in South Edmonton in the summer of 1957
Gordon Hunter
VariantT-1aT-1b, c
General
Built19291938, 1949
ManufacturerMontreal Locomotive Works
Axle config2-10-4 (Texas) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase46 ft 1/4 in46 ft
Fixed wheelbase22 ft46 ft
Total wheelbase87 ft 1/2 in87 ft 5 in
Service weight452,500 lbs447,000 lbs
Adhesive weight312,800 lbs310,000 lbs
Total weight750,000 lbs731,000 lbs
Water capacity14,400 us gal
Fuel capacity4,920 lbs (oil)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,500 hp (3,356 kW)4,900 hp (3,654 kW)
Optimal speed37 mph41 mph
Starting effort77,204 lbf76,905 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure275 psi285 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 25 1/2 x 32 intwo, 25 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area93.5 sq ft
Firebox area422 sq ft412 sq ft
Tube heating area4,509 sq ft4,642 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,931 sq ft5,054 sq ft
Superheater area2,112 sq ft2,032 sq ft
Total heating area7,043 sq ft7,086 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
passenger
last changed: 12 2023
Canadian Pacific class T4a
Canada | 1931 | only one produced
General
Built1931
ManufacturerAngus Shops
Axle config2-10-4 (Texas) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length98 ft 9 1/16 in
Service weight495,040 lbs
Total weight796,320 lbs
Water capacity12,000 us gal
Fuel capacity4,100 lbs (oil)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power5,000 hp (3,729 kW)
Optimal speed32 mph
Starting effort99,145 lbf
with start valve118,974 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure870 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersthree, HP: 15 1/2 x 28 in
and LP: 24 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area77 sq ft
Firebox area520 sq ft
Tube heating area3,746 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,266 sq ft
Superheater area753.5 sq ft
Total heating area5,019.5 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
high pressure
prototype
last changed: 08 2023
Canadian Pacific classes N3a, b, c and N2a, b, c
Canada | 1909 | 199 produced
No. 3716 in July 1986 in North Vancouver, British Columbia
No. 3716 in July 1986 in North Vancouver, British Columbia
Gary Everhart / www.rrpicturearchives.net

In 1909 H.H. Vaughan would produce a Consolidation that should achieve more power with 24x32 inch cylinders, but thanks to 63 inch (1,600 mm) large driving wheels should have enough steam even at higher speeds. However, during the trial runs it became apparent that the boiler was still insufficient at higher speeds. This resulted in the production engines with a cylinder diameter of just 23.5 inches.

In the years 1909 to 1911 the production engines of the class N3a were built, in 1912 more of the class N3b and in 1913 finally the class N3c. Technically, the subclasses were almost identical, but they differed in the driver's cab. The N3b and N3c used all-weather driver's cabs, which were characterized by an additional vestibule.

Since the capacity of the boiler later still proved to be too low compared to the cylinders, the conversion to class N2a to c took place in the 1920s. The diameter of the cylinders was reduced to 23 inches and the area of the firebox increased at the expense of the tube heating area. A larger superheater was also used.

There were two different versions of the N2, which had different boilers with 141 and 165 tubes respectively. 40 locomotives were converted to oil firing by 1950. As early as 1946, 65 units were converted to the P1n class with the 2-8-2 wheel arrangement. Four remain today, of which 3512 has been lying at the bottom of Slocan Lake in British Columbia since 1947 after a barge carrying the locomotive capsized.

VariantN3N2
General
Built1909-19131923-1926
ManufacturerCanadian Pacific, Montreal Locomotive Works, Canada FoundryMontreal Locomotive Works
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length75 ft 5 1/2 in
Wheelbase25 ft 5 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase55 ft 11 1/2 in55 ft 8 in
Service weight220,000 lbs240,000 lbs
Adhesive weight195,000 lbs216,000 lbs
Total weight354,000 lbs379,000 lbs
Water capacity6,000 us gal
Fuel capacity22,000 lbs (coal)24,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,700 hp (1,268 kW)1,800 hp (1,342 kW)
Optimal speed25 mph26 mph
Starting effort42,918 lbf43,395 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure180 psi190 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 23 1/2 x 32 intwo, 23 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area49.5 sq ft
Firebox area165 sq ft191 sq ft
Tube heating area2,400 sq ft2,125 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,565 sq ft2,316 sq ft
Superheater area436 sq ft602 sq ft
Total heating area3,001 sq ft2,918 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 01/2023
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