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Page views since 2023-01-26: 260197
North American Electric Locomotives until 1945[Inhalt]
Boston & Maine No. 5000 to 5006
United States | 1910 | 7 produced
No. 2503, later 5002
No. 2503, later 5002
Pennsylvania Railway Museum Association
General
Built1910, 1917
Manufacturermechanical part: Baldwin, electrical part: Westinghouse
Axle config1-B+B-1 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length48 ft 0 in
Wheelbase38 ft 6 in
Service weight265,591 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - AC
Electric system11,000 V 25 Hz
Hourly power1,500 hp (1,119 kW)
Continuous power1,350 hp (1,007 kW)
Top speed37 mph
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
last changed: 09 2023
Canadian National Boxcab Electric
Canada | 1917 | 6 produced
No. 6713 in October 1987 in Val Royal, Quebec
No. 6713 in October 1987 in Val Royal, Quebec
Roger Puta
General
Built1917
ManufacturerGeneral Electric
Axle configB-B 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight174,000 lbs
Adhesive weight174,000 lbs
Axle load43,500 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - DC
Electric system2,400 V
Top speed55 mph
Starting effort19,500 lbf
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
electric locomotive
passenger
freight
last changed: 09 2023
Great Northern (US) Boxcab
United States | 1909 | 4 produced
General Electric works photo
General Electric works photo
General
Built1909
Manufacturermechanical part: ALCO, electrical part: General Electric
Axle configB-B 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length44 ft 2 in
Service weight230,000 lbs
Adhesive weight230,000 lbs
Axle load61,910 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - three-phase
Electric system6,600 V 25 Hz
Continuous power1,475 hp (1,100 kW)
Top speed15 mph
Starting effort57,500 lbf
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
electric locomotive
freight
last changed: 08 2023
Great Northern (US) class Z-1
United States | 1926 | 10 produced
Two Z-1s houble-headed with a freight train
Two Z-1s houble-headed with a freight train
Railway and locomotive engineering, February 1927
General
Built1926-1928
Manufacturermechanical part: Baldwin, electrical part: Westinghouse
Axle config1-D-1 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length47 ft 2 in
Service weight371,100 lbs
Adhesive weight284,800 lbs
Axle load71,200 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - AC
Electric system11,000 V 25 Hz
Continuous power1,824 hp (1,360 kW)
Top speed45 mph
Starting effort71,040 lbf
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
electric locomotive
freight
passenger
last changed: 10 2023
Great Northern (US) class Y-1
Pennsylvania class FF2
United States | 1927 | 8 produced
No. 5011 in a photo from 1927
No. 5011 in a photo from 1927
General Electric
Variant5010-50115012-5017
General
Built1927-1930
Manufacturermechanical part: ALCO, electrical part: General Electric
Axle config1-C+C-1 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Fixed wheelbase15 ft 4 in
Service weight518,250 lbs527,200 lbs
Adhesive weight410,000 lbs
Axle load68,333 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - AC
Electric system11,000 V 25 Hz
Hourly power3,300 hp (2,461 kW)
Continuous power3,000 hp (2,237 kW)
Top speed55 mph
Starting effort102,900 lbf
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
electric locomotive
freight
passenger
last changed: 10 2023
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) classes EF-1, EF-2, EF-3 and EF-5
United States | 1915 | 42 produced
Side view of a double unit
Side view of a double unit
Locomotive Cyclopedia of American Practice, 1922
VariantEF-1rebuilt EF-2rebuilt EF-3rebuilt EF-5
General
Built1915-1916
ManufacturerGeneral Electric
Axle config2-B+B+B+B-2 2-B+B+2-B+B+B+B-2 2-B+B+B+B+B+B-2 2-B+B+2-B+B+B+B-2+B+B-2 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length112 ft 0 in168 ft 0 in224 ft 0 1/16 in
Wheelbase46 ft 7 in
Fixed wheelbase10 ft
Total wheelbase102 ft 8 in
Service weight564,000 lbs845,000 lbs794,000 lbs1,128,000 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - DC
Electric system3,000 V
Continuous power3,339 hp (2,490 kW)5,009 hp (3,735 kW)6,678 hp (4,980 kW)
Top speed35 mph45 mph
Starting effort103,000 lbf154,500 lbf205,700 lbf
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
electric locomotive
freight
two-section
multi-section locomotive
last changed: 09 2023
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) class EP-2
United States | 1919 | 5 produced
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, December 1919

After the electrification of the mountain routes over the Rocky Mountains, the Milwaukee Road also took on the Coast Division in Washington. This required an electric locomotive that could pull the heavy passenger trains faster than the steam locomotives available at the time without double-heading. While the Rocky Mountains had many long, straight stretches on the plateaus, here the inclines of the Cascade Mountains had to be negotiated. A total of five examples of the EP-2 were built in 1919, costing $200,000 each and nicknamed “Bipolar” because of the two-pole traction motors used. They were built parallel to Baldwin-Westinghouse's EP-3 because the US Railroad Administration dictated orders to be split between manufacturers.

1922 Locomotive Cyclopedia of American Practice

A total of twelve powered axles were required to achieve the required power. In order to achieve sufficient running characteristics in curves, the chassis was divided into four groups that were coupled to each other. The two outer groups each comprised a leading and two powered axles, while the two inner groups consisted of four powered axles each. The body consisted of three parts and each was movably mounted between two chassis groups. The electrical equipment and a driver's cab were located in the outer parts, while a boiler for the train heating was housed in the middle part.

E-3 after conversion in January 1958 in Butte, Montana
E-3 after conversion in January 1958 in Butte, Montana
Craig Garver

Although only five examples were built, they were the flagship of the Milwaukee Road, pulling important long-distance trains like the Olympian. Despite being designed for 90 mph, they were only certified for 70 mph, which was sufficient in their area of application. In 1939, the locomotives that previously had the numbers 10250 to 10254 were renumbered E-1 to E-5.

In 1953 the heavily worn locomotives were completely rebuilt. In addition to a modernized electrical system that allowed higher speeds and multiple controls, they also received streamlined cladding. Shortly thereafter, the locomotives were transferred to the Mountain Division. It was found that the last conversion, which had been carried out by a team not specialized in electric locomotives, had not been carried out optimally. As damage and failures now occurred more frequently, all locomotives were phased out by 1960.

General
Built1919
ManufacturerGeneral Electric
Axle config1B-D+D-B1 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length76 ft 0 in
Service weight53,000 lbs
Adhesive weight458,000 lbs
Axle load38,167 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - DC
Electric system3,000 V
Hourly power4,440 hp (3,311 kW)
Continuous power3,084 hp (2,300 kW)
Top speed70 mph
Starting effort116,000 lbf
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
electric locomotive
passenger
last changed: 05/2022
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) class EP-3
United States | 1919 | 10 produced
E-11 in December 1952 in front of the “Columbian” in Butte, Montana
E-11 in December 1952 in front of the “Columbian” in Butte, Montana
Gregory Weirich

After the Coast Division was electrified via the Cascades, the Milwaukee Road procured very large passenger locomotives for the increasingly heavy trains. Due to the allocation to the manufacturers ordered by the US Railroad Administration, a further ten EP-3s from Baldwin-Westinghouse were built in parallel to the five EP-2s from General Electric. Although the EP-3 was heavier, it appeared more graceful in general.

Railway and Locomotive Engineering, April 1918

The locomotive body was not divided here, which made greater demands on the division of the chassis. In principle, the locomotives each consisted of two chassis groups, each of which resembled a Pacific steam locomotive and were coupled to one another. Each axle was driven by a double motor, which was mounted in the frame and was therefore not part of the unsprung mass. The drive was here via hollow shafts, which gave the locomotives the nickname “Quills”. Above the coupling between the chassis parts was the oil-fired oven for the train heating,

Sectional drawing with dimensions
Sectional drawing with dimensions

Due to the relatively rigid overall construction and the lack of mobility of the axles, the great wear and tear on the wheel flanges soon became apparent during operation, and there were also derailments. In retrospect, the weight-saving design of the locomotives did not prove to be advantageous either, so that the frames broke. Dividing the locomotive body of one of the locomotives into two parts was not expedient and even several modifications to the chassis and other assemblies of the locomotives could not eliminate all problems.

After the Second World War, the EP-4 „Little Joe” took over the duties of the EP-3. While other electric locomotives, badly worn out during the war, had been refurbished, this was not considered useful for the EP-3. Thus, the seven remaining vehicles were all scrapped between 1952 and 1957.

General
Built1919
Manufacturermechanical part: Baldwin, electrical part: Westinghouse
Axle config2-C-1+1-C-2 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length88 ft 7 in
Wheelbase79 ft 10 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 9 in
Service weight600,000 lbs
Adhesive weight377,000 lbs
Axle load62,833 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - DC
Electric system3,000 V
Hourly power4,680 hp (3,490 kW)
Continuous power3,396 hp (2,532 kW)
Top speed65 mph
Starting effort105,000 lbf
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
electric locomotive
passenger
last changed: 06/2022
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) class ES-1
United States | 1915 | only one produced
Photo of the machine in the “Electric Railway Journal”
Photo of the machine in the “Electric Railway Journal”
General
Built1915
ManufacturerGeneral Electric
Axle configB-B 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight98,900 lbs
Adhesive weight98,900 lbs
Axle load24,725 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - DC
Electric system1,500 V
Continuous power315 hp (235 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
electric locomotive
switcher
last changed: 08 2023
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) class ES-2
United States | 1916 | 4 produced
E80 with a freight train at Deer Lodge
E80 with a freight train at Deer Lodge
Drew Jacksich
General
Built1916, 1919
ManufacturerGeneral Electric
Axle configB-B 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length41 ft 5 in
Wheelbase30 ft 4 in
Service weight164,000 lbs
Adhesive weight164,000 lbs
Axle load41,000 lbs
Power
Power sourceelectric - DC
Electric system3,000 V
Hourly power670 hp (500 kW)
Continuous power475 hp (354 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
electric locomotive
switcher
last changed: 10 2023
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