loco-info.com
The reference for locomotives and railcars
Navigation
Random
Search
Compare
Settings
Petrol Railcars for Local Traffic[Inhalt]
AEG railcar type Flensburg
Germany | 1925 | 4 produced
T1 or T2 of the Flensburg county railways in January 1930
T1 or T2 of the Flensburg county railways in January 1930
Schöning/Kupfer „Die Flensburger Kreisbahnen”
Variantas builtre-engined 145 hp diesel
General
Built1925
ManufacturerLHL, NAG
Axle config2-B 
Gauge3 ft 3 3/8 in (Meter gauge)
Seats40
Dimensions and Weights
Length45 ft 0 3/16 in
Wheelbase30 ft 10 7/8 in
Fixed wheelbase5 ft 3 in
Empty weight33,510 lbs
Power
Power sourcepetrol-mechanicdiesel-mechanic
Top speed22 mph
Engine type4-cyl. petrol8-cyl. diesel
Engine output74 hp (55 kW)143 hp (107 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
DMU
railbus
local
secondary line
last changed: 10 2023
German Reichsbahn No. 701 to 704
Germany | 1926 | 4 produced
AEG works photo
AEG works photo
Heinz R. Kurz, „Die Triebwagen der Reichsbahn-Bauarten”

Since diesel engines were still very heavy in the 1920s, the Reichsbahn also procured various railcars with benzene engines. Some two- and four-axle examples of these vehicles with riveted car bodies, later also referred to as “heavy-duty versions”, were built in 1926. The four two-axle vehicles were given the operating numbers 701 to 704. The designs envisaged railcars weighing around 20 tonnes with a large compartment for 50 people. With regard to the engine, transmission and other components of the machinery, the aim was to use only commercially available and tried and tested components from truck construction. This was not only intended to reduce manufacturing costs, but also to enable maintenance and repairs to be carried out by regular truck workshops.

A four-stroke benzene engine with six cylinders took over the propulsion, which drove one of the two axles via a mechanical transmission. The engine was housed in the car body and there was a cooler on each end. The gearbox was below the passenger compartment. Due to the use of two types of gearboxes and some other assemblies that were designed differently on a trial basis, each vehicle had a different curb weight. What was special was that the power lever only actuated an electropneumatic circuit that controlled the engine and transmission. This system was developed by AEG exclusively for these railcars and their four-axle relatives with the numbers 755 and 756.

The four vehicles were mostly used in the area of Frankfurt (Oder) or the now Polish towns of Pyritz and Meseritz. Later, a second-class compartment and a toilet were installed, thereby reducing the third-class space. After the end of the war, three of the four cars had already been written off as losses and only number 702 was still available on the territory of the East Reichsbahn. This was no longer used, but was only scrapped in 1957.

General
Built1926
ManufacturerLHB
Axle configA1 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length42 ft 3 7/8 in
Wheelbase20 ft 4 1/8 in
Empty weight50,706 lbs
Power
Power sourcebenzene-mechanic
Top speed31 mph
EngineKL 10 Z
Engine type6-cyl. petrol
Engine output74 hp (55 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
secondary line
local
railbus
last changed: 02/2022
German Reichsbahn No. 755 and 756
Germany | 1926 | 2 produced
Heinz R. Kurz, Die Triebwagen der Reichsbahn-Bauarten

A four-axle variant was also developed in parallel with the two-axle railcars 701 to 704. The two locomotives received the numbers 755 and 756. With otherwise almost identical technical equipment, one can say that it is a double version of the two-axle variant. On each side was a six-cylinder benzene engine arranged lengthwise in the driver's cab, which drove the inner axle of the bogie below with mechanical transmission. Around 1930, an additional cooler for each engine was retrofitted on the roof, since the area of application was also in mountainous areas and the rear engine in particular could be cooled better in this way.

Here, too, two different transmissions were tested, so one vehicle received two WG 70 transmissions from the National Automobile Society (NAG) and the other two so-called Mylius transmissions with gear preselection. Doubling the power but significantly less than twice the weight resulted in a better power-to-weight ratio, whereupon the top speed was set a little higher at 60 km/h. With an offer of 65 seats, the capacity was not significantly larger than that of the smaller version. However, from the beginning there was a third-class compartment next to the open fourth-class compartment and a toilet. After a later remodeling, the open compartment was offered as a third class, while one second-class compartment was available.

As with the sister model, no series production followed. The reasons for this are that in the years that followed, more and more lightweight railbuses and heavier railcars with diesel engines appeared, against which these “heavy versions” with benzene engines could not hold their own. One prototype each was housed in Delitzsch and Kassel. The Delitzsch vehicle fell victim to a fire in 1932 and was scrapped. The other example was initially retired at the beginning of the war for economic reasons, but was eventually converted to run on liquid gas and put back into service. However, it did not survive the war without major damage and was subsequently scrapped.

General
Built1926
ManufacturerLHB
Axle config1A-A1 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length55 ft 10 1/16 in
Wheelbase41 ft 4 1/16 in
Fixed wheelbase6 ft 2 13/16 in
Service weight80,469 lbs
Adhesive weight41,888 lbs
Axle load20,944 lbs
Power
Power sourcebenzene-mechanic
Top speed37 mph
EngineKL 10 Z
Engine type2x 6-cyl. petrol
Engine output148 hp (110 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
local
last changed: 02/2022
Deutsche Werke Kiel model IV a standard gauge
Germany | 1924 | unknown number
Railcar of the Salzwedler Kleinbahn
Railcar of the Salzwedler Kleinbahn
Wolfgang List „Stendal und die Eisenbahnen”
General
Builtfrom 1924
ManufacturerDWK
Axle config1A-A1 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Seats40
Dimensions and Weights
Length44 ft 3 1/2 in
Wheelbase33 ft 1 5/8 in
Fixed wheelbase5 ft 1 in
Empty weight44,092 lbs
Power
Power sourcepetrol-mechanic
Top speed28 mph
Engine type4-cyl. petrol
Engine output74 hp (55 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
local
railbus
secondary line
last changed: 10 2023
Furka-Oberalp Railway BCm 2/2
Rhaetian Railway CFm 2/2 and BFm 2/2
Switzerland | 1927 | 2 produced
Photo from the data sheet of the SLM
Photo from the data sheet of the SLM
SBB Historic

The Furka-Oberalp-Bahn designated two petrol rack railcars that were delivered in 1927 as BCm 2/2. They were supposed to handle all services during low-traffic times and had a toilet and a mail compartment, while the rear cab was used as a luggage compartment. The rack drive and the adhesion drive could not be decoupled from each other. They were also referred to as BCZm 2/2 by the Railway Department.

However, the performance was not convincing, which was mainly attributed to the lack of experience with transmissions in railway vehicles with combustion engines. A maximum of one two-axle car could also be carried, which significantly increased travel times. With electrification in 1941, they became superfluous, although the first was used as a service vehicle for a while and passed to several new owners in the following decades, remaining inoperable. The other was sold to the RhB and used without rack drive until 1956.

General
Built1927
ManufacturerSLM, SIG, Scintilla
Axle configAA 
Gauge3 ft 3 3/8 in (Meter gauge)
Seats32
Dimensions and Weights
Length36 ft 4 in
Wheelbase15 ft 1 1/8 in
Fixed wheelbase15 ft 1 1/8 in
Empty weight36,817 lbs
Service weight42,990 lbs
Adhesive weight42,990 lbs
Axle load21,605 lbs
Power
Power sourcepetrol-mechanic
Top speed27 mph
EngineSLM
Engine type8-cyl. boxer
Engine output148 hp (110 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
cog railway
local
secondary line
narrow gauge
last changed: 03/2024
McKeen railmotor
United States | 1905 | 152 produced
70-foot variant of Union Pacific (originally Oregon Short Line) with baggage compartment in Denver
70-foot variant of Union Pacific (originally Oregon Short Line) with baggage compartment in Denver
collection Taylor Rush

In 1904, William Riley McKeen, once the superintendent in charge of vehicle procurement for the Union Pacific, had the idea of a gas-powered, streamlined railcar. Inspired by shipbuilding, he designed a shape that was tapered at the front and rounded at the back. Prompted by the then CEO of UP, the McKeen Company was founded to put this idea into practice. It was hoped that the petrol-powered railcars would be cheaper to operate than steam locomotives and the high acquisition costs and operational limitations of a battery railcar were to be avoided. The first, still two-axle vehicle was completed in 1905 and this was soon followed by a series of four-axle vehicles, which were ordered in large numbers by many operators in the USA.

The body was offered in two lengths of 55 and 70 feet and the interior could be fitted with either a large or small mail and luggage compartment or complete with passenger seats and a smoker's compartment at the rear with panoramic views. The windows were shaped like portholes and thus adapted to the ship-shaped car body. The engine also came from shipbuilding and stood directly on the front bogie. Only one axle was powered via the mechanical power transmission, which in combination with the low torque of the engine made for poor starting performance. From the eighth vehicle, a self-developed engine was installed, which now had 200 or 310 instead of 100 hp. There was no gearbox with reverse gear to change direction, but the camshaft could be shifted like on ships. This made it possible to run the engine in reverse after it had been stopped.

Side view of the 70 feet variant
Side view of the 70 feet variant
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, September 1909

A total of 152 vehicles were built, of which 32 went to the Union Pacific and 31 to the Southern Pacific. From 1910 they also were exported. Two units went to Australia to the Victorian Railways and were delivered with a gauge of 5 ft 3 in. Five units were also delivered to the Queensland Railways with a gauge of 3 ft 6 in. Over time it became apparent that mounting the engine on the bogie was becoming a problem for the railcars. Since this was nearly unsprung, all impacts took their toll over time and made more and more vehicles inoperable. As a result, production ceased in 1917 and the Union Pacific dissolved the McKeen Company. Many railcars were later converted to passenger coaches and by the end of the 1930s there were almost no longer any engines on the road. The only example still running today belongs to the Virginia and Truckee Railroad and uses a modern drive train.

Variant55 feet 100 hp70 feet 300 hp
General
Built1905-1917
ManufacturerMcKeen Company
Axle configA1-2 
Gauge3 ft 6 in (Cape gauge), 4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge), 5 ft 3 in (Irish broad gauge)
Seats64105
Dimensions and Weights
Length54 ft 0 in70 ft 0 in
Power
Power sourcepetrol-mechanic
EngineStandard Motor WorksMcKeen
Engine type6-cyl. petrol
Engine output100 hp (75 kW)300 hp (224 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
streamline
last changed: 02/2022
South Australian Brill railcar
Australia | 1924 | 51 produced
No. 41 (Model 55) at the National Railway Museum, Port Adelaide
No. 41 (Model 55) at the National Railway Museum, Port Adelaide
Bahnfrend

For rural, low-traffic lines of the South Australian Railways, J.G. Brill developed the railcars of the models 55 and 75. They differed on the one hand by different lengths and on the other hand by petrol engines with an output of 68 and 186 hp, respectively. The 75 model was also combined with a trailer. They were used almost all over South Australia and were called “Barwell Bulls”. Later, all received more powerful diesel engines. They were replaced by Bluebird and Redhen railcars in rural areas in the 1950s and then used in the suburbs of Adelaide until 1971.

VariantModel 55Model 75
General
Built1924-1927
ManufacturerJ.G. Brill, Islington Railway Workshops
Axle configB-2 
Gauge3 ft 6 in (Cape gauge), 5 ft 3 in (Irish broad gauge)
Seats4363
Dimensions and Weights
Length48 ft 6 11/16 in58 ft 4 13/16 in
Power
Power sourcepetrol-mechanic
EngineMidewestWinton
Engine type4-cyl. petrol
Engine output68 hp (51 kW)186 hp (139 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
local
secondary line
last changed: 08/2023
Czechoslovak State Railways Tatra tower railcar
later M 120.3, M 120.4, M 130.2, M 130.3, M 140.1 and M 11.0
Czechoslovakia | 1928 | 221 produced
M 130.2 railcar on a Tatra works photo
M 130.2 railcar on a Tatra works photo

Tatra developed the vehicles, also known as “tower railcars”, to transition passenger transport on branch lines and narrow-gauge railways with low passenger density from steam to internal combustion engines. Designer Hans Ledwinka's idea was to simplify operation and reduce costs with a single, elevated driver's cab. Its chassis corresponded to a two-axle goods wagon and the engine was suspended in the middle. The driver sat above the engine on a rotating chair from which he could see both directions of travel.

Most variants were powered by a petrol engine with an output of between 65 and 120 hp, which was connected to a four-speed gearbox and drove one axle. A conventional reversing gear was installed in the first variants. Later, engines with two camshafts were used, which could turn in both directions and thus made it possible to drive forwards and backwards. The tanks were arranged on the roof in front of and behind the cab. Depending on the engine power installed and the route profile, up to two specially developed trailers could be attached.

The first construction lot from 1928 included three different types. The M 120.3 series with 36 seats and an overall length of 9.20 m, which reached 55 km/h and of which a total of 27 examples were built up to 1930, was created for passenger transport on standard-gauge routes. At the same time, the M 140.1 series for express freight traffic was created, which was only 5.80 m long, was the fastest variant at 70 km/h and was only built four times. Furthermore, the M 11.0 series, which was somewhat narrower and shorter than the M 120.3 series, was built nine times for the Bosnian gauge of 760 mm.

The variants built later were all passenger railcars in standard gauge, which were between 10.53 and 10.70 m long and had a higher engine output. It all started with the M 120.4 series, of which 89 examples were built between 1930 and 1935. They initially had 100 and later 120 hp and were 60 km/h fast. A total of 63 examples of the M 130.2 series were built between 1933 and 1937 with the same dimensions and power data, but a new interior design. At the same time, the M 130.3 series was created, 30 of which had a diesel engine with initially 120 and later 125 hp and were otherwise almost identical to their sisters.

The vehicles were distributed to many branch lines within Czechoslovakia. After the annexation of the Sudentenland by Germany and World War II, some vehicles were removed from their ancestral territory. Just some of the narrow-gauge railcars of the M 11.0 series made it to Austria and later others were on Hungarian or Romanian territory. The majority of the vehicles remained in Czechoslovakia after the end of the war. With the introduction of the modern railcars of the M 131.1 series, the M 120.3 series was at first phased out by 1949. The M 120.4 series lasted the longest, the last examples of which were parked in 1965.

VariantM 120.3M 140.1M 11.0M 130.3 (late variant)
General
Built1928-193019281928-19321933-1937
ManufacturerTatra Kopřivnice, Vagonka Tatra Studénka
Axle configA1 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)2 ft 5 15/16 in (Bosnian gauge)4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Seats3603837
Dimensions and Weights
Length30 ft 2 3/16 in19 ft 0 3/8 in28 ft 2 9/16 in35 ft 1 1/4 in
Wheelbase13 ft 10 1/8 in11 ft 6 9/16 in13 ft 1 1/2 in16 ft 4 7/8 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 10 1/8 in11 ft 6 9/16 in13 ft 1 1/2 in16 ft 4 7/8 in
Empty weight18,298 lbs13,007 lbs15,983 lbs34,392 lbs
Service weight27,117 lbs28,440 lbs42,990 lbs
Adhesive weight13,228 lbs14,330 lbs22,487 lbs
Axle load13,228 lbs14,330 lbs22,487 lbs
Power
Power sourcepetrol-mechanicdiesel-mechanic
Top speed34 mph43 mph25 mph37 mph
EngineTatra
Engine type6-cyl. petrol6-cyl. diesel
Engine output64 hp (48 kW)123 hp (92 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
DMU
railbus
local
Hans Ledwinka
last changed: 01/2022
Victorian Railways AEC railmotor
Australia | 1922 | 19 produced
RM 4 railmotor with MT 4 trailer
RM 4 railmotor with MT 4 trailer
http://www.victorianrailways.net
General
Built1922-1925
ManufacturerNewport
Axle configA-1
Gauge5 ft 3 in (Irish broad gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase18 ft 2 3/8 in
Fixed wheelbase18 ft 2 3/8 in
Power
Power sourcepetrol-mechanic
Engine type4-cyl. petrol
Engine output45 hp (34 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
local
secondary line
last changed: 09 2023
Waggonfabrik Wismar type Hanover
German Reichsbahn 133 and 135 and German Federal Railway VT 889 and 899
Germany | 1932 | 57 produced
Railbus with luggage rack in July 2005 in the Bochum-Dahlhausen railway museum
Railbus with luggage rack in July 2005 in the Bochum-Dahlhausen railway museum
Markus Schweiss
Variant40 hp narrow gauge40 hp standard gauge50 hp standard gauge with luggage compartment
General
Built1932-1941
ManufacturerWismar
Axle configA1 
Gauge3 ft 3 3/8 in (Meter gauge)4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Seats244022
Dimensions and Weights
Length33 ft 1 5/8 in38 ft 1 1/16 in33 ft 1 5/8 in
Wheelbase13 ft 1 1/2 in19 ft 8 1/4 in13 ft 1 1/2 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 1 1/2 in19 ft 8 1/4 in13 ft 1 1/2 in
Empty weight12,787 lbs14,550 lbs13,669 lbs
Power
Power sourcepetrol-mechanic
Top speed31 mph37 mph
EngineFord AAFord BB
Engine type2x 4-cyl. petrol (one per direction)
Engine output39 hp (29 kW)50 hp (37 kW)
Power Plant
Boiler
Calculated Values
petrol railcar
secondary line
railbus
local
narrow gauge
last changed: 09 2023
loading...

We use cookies to save the following settings:

  • selected navigation structure
  • selected language
  • preferred units
  • spelling of railway company names

If you refuse the use of cookies, the settings will only be retained for the current session and will be reset to the default values the next time you visit the site.

Display of units

Here you can set the desired unit system for the technical data.

  • Metric: Lengths in meters, weights in tonnes, and volumes in cubic meters
  • Imperial (UK): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in long tons and volumes in imperial gallons
  • Imperial (US): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in pounds, and volumes in US gallons
  • Individual: Depends on the country of origin of each locomotive
Operator names

Here you can set the display of railway company names.

  • Short: Abbreviation or short form of the name
  • Standard: commonly used name, partially translated to English
  • Complete: full name in local language