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North American Industry, Mining and Logging Steam Locomotives[Inhalt]
Albion Mines “Samson”, “Hercules” and “John Buddle”
Canada | 1838 | 3 produced
“Samson” at the “Fair of the Iron Horse” 1927
“Samson” at the “Fair of the Iron Horse” 1927
Fraser / Nova Scotia archivees

The “Samson” and its two sisters were among the first steam locomotives in Canada. They had been ordered from the Albion mines in Nova Scotia and built by Hackworth in Durham. In May 1839 they arrived disassembled by ship in Canada and were then taken to their destination and assembled.

The three coupled axles were driven by vertical cylinders. The boiler had a return flue, meaning the firebox and chimney were both at the front. Thus, the positions of engine driver and fireman were at opposite ends.

Despite its primitive design, the “Samson” remained in regular service with the Albion Mines until 1867, during which time it also had to pull passenger trains. Up until 1885, it was used to provide reinforcement when needed and had a higher tractive effort than more modern, faster locomotives. In 1883 it made a trip to the Chicago Railroad Fair.

Only in 1893 it was rescued from the junkyard and preserved with a passenger car by the Baltimore & Ohio until it came back to Canada in 1927. Today it can be seen in the museum in Stellarton, Nova Scotia. This makes it the oldest surviving locomotive in Canada and also is almost in its original condition.

General
Built1838
ManufacturerTimothy Hackworth
Axle config0-6-0 (Six-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase8 ft 8 in
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 8 in
Service weight37,920 lbs
Adhesive weight37,920 lbs
Axle load12,640 lbs
Water capacity540 us gal
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power80 hp (60 kW)
Optimal speed13 mph
Top speed8 mph
Starting effort3,954 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter48 in
Boiler pressure60 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 15 1/4 x 16 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
Timothy Hackworth
prototype
last changed: 04/2023
Ashland Iron Co. “Edward Patterson”
United States | 1872 | only one produced
Ron Ziel, American Locomotives 1858 to 1949

The “Edward Patterson” was built in May 1872 by Baldwin with the works number 2819 for the Ashland Iron Co. in Kentucky. It later came to Maryland Steel. It was a small two-axle saddle tank locomotive that was nevertheless powerful thanks to its small drivers. Locomotives in this size were built by several manufacturers and were used from the second half of the 19th century in large numbers by industrial, agricultural and forestry operators. In many places, they replaced draught animals, which increased transport capacity and reduced costs.

General
Built1872
ManufacturerH.K. Porter
Axle config0-4-0ST (Four-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power100 hp (75 kW)
Power Plant
Expansion typesimple
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
industry
switcher
last changed: 04/2024
Cass Scenic No. 6 (Heisler type 90-12-40)
United States | 1929 | only one produced
James St. John / Cass Scenic Railroad # 6 steam locomotive (Heisler 3-truck)

The largest type among the Heisler locomotives was the 90-12-40. This meant a service weight of 90 short tons, twelve wheels and a wheel diameter of 40 inches. With this, an additional tender was stored on a third, two-axle bogie, which was also connected to the drive shaft. Although Charles L. Heisler's patent originally included four-cylinder locomotives, the largest locomotives were also built with two cylinders and an increased boiler pressure of 200psi. The maximum train weight was around 600 tons on a gradient of two percent and 225 tons at five percent. In theory, up to 4,000 tons were possible on the flat, but these geared locomotives were not intended for the flat country.

A surviving example of the large design is the standard gauge number 6 of the Cass Scenic Railroad. The latter operates an eleven mile long, very hilly line in the Allegheny Mountains in West Virginia, which was built in 1901. On the Cass Scenic Railroad, the Heisler, built in 1929, is the only one of its kind, while the other engines consist of a Climax and otherwise only Shays. Today, like the rest of the fleet, it is still owned by the state of West Virginia, but is now used in Durbin by the operating company Durbin and Greenbrier Valley Railroad. The locomotive was originally built for the Meadow River Lumber Company, which at the time operated one of the largest sawmills in the world.

General
Built1929
ManufacturerHeisler
Axle config0-4-4-4-0T (Heisler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length48 ft 1 1/2 in
Service weight180,000 lbs
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Starting effort19,393 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter38 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 x 15 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
geared steam locomotive
Heisler
freight
passenger
last changed: 04/2022
Lake Independence Lumber Co. No. 1 to 5 (Shay B-50-2)
United States | 1910 | 5 produced
collection George R. Kadelak

One of the standard models of the Shay built in larger numbers was the class B in the version with a service weight of about 50 short tons. Like all B, C and D class models, they had three cylinders. Some of the B-50-2 model locomotives already had a boiler pressure of 220 psi, while most others were still operated at 200 psi. In the meantime, the gear parts on the right side of the locomotives were covered to protect them from dirt while working in the forest. Curb weight was 85,800 pounds for early examples and approached 99,000 pounds for locomotives from the mid-20's.

The Lake Independence Lumber Company in Michigan operated a total of five B-50-2s in addition to one B-42-2. Two of these had been built in 1910 and 1911 for other logging companies and came to this company later. Two more had been built directly for the Lake Independence Lumber Co. in 1914 and 1925 and an identical 1923 example had been purchased from Lima stocks. All five were resold in the 1920s, four of them to the Brunswick Lumber Company.

General
Built1910-1914, 1923, 1925
ManufacturerLima
Axle config0-4-4-0T (Shay) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Empty weight85,800 lbs
Water capacity1,750 us gal
Fuel capacity6,500 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Top speed17 mph
Starting effort22,563 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter32 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylindersthree, 11 x 12 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
Shay
geared steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 04/2022
McCloud River No. 24 and 25
United States | 1925 | 2 produced
No. 25 in October 2015 on the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad
No. 25 in October 2015 on the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad
Ben Brooks

The last four steam engines the McCloud River Railroad purchased in 1925 were oil-fired and made by ALCO. The numbers 20 and 21 from 1924 already had the wheel arrangement 2-6-2 and came from Baldwin. Then numbers 22 and 23 with the same wheel arrangement came from ALCO. The numbers 24 and 25, which were again delivered in the same year, had two inches larger coupling wheels and larger cylinders to compensate.

They were in service with logging operations until the mid-1950s, when steam operations ended at the McCloud. The number 25 was reactivated in 1962 for special trips. After operating on its original route with some interruptions until 2001, it joined the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad in 2011 and is still in service today.

General
Built1925
ManufacturerALCO
Axle config2-6-2 (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase25 ft 8 in
Fixed wheelbase9 ft 9 in
Service weight147,000 lbs
Adhesive weight119,000 lbs
Total weight455,260 lbs
Water capacity4,000 us gal
Fuel capacity1,800 lbs (oil)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,200 hp (895 kW)
Optimal speed27 mph
Starting effort28,817 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter46 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 19 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area30.2 sq ft
Firebox area147 sq ft
Tube heating area1,095 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,242 sq ft
Superheater area266 sq ft
Total heating area1,508 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 02/2023
Olds Lumber Co. No. 1 (Climax class B 50 tons)
Hillcrest Lumber Co. No. 9
Canada | 1915 | only one produced
Number 9 on display at the BC Forest Discovery Center in 1995
Number 9 on display at the BC Forest Discovery Center in 1995
Foto: SoftwareSimian

While the first Class A Climax locomotives still had a vertical boiler and vertical cylinders, the majority of the later classes A, B and C got a horizontal boiler and laterally mounted, horizontal or inclined cylinders. The machine last run as Hillcrest Lumber Company No. 9 was a two bogie class B example. Classified in the 50-tons category, it was actually quite a bit lighter. It used oil as fuel. The maximum train loads of locomotives in this class were over 2,000 tons on level ground and 130 tons on a six percent incline.

The locomotive was built in 1915 for the M.D. Olds Lumber Company in Michigan, but turned out to be too light for their purpose and was sold to Vancouver in Canada in 1917. There it was involved in the collection of wood for aircraft construction, but after the end of the war the demand collapsed and led to another sale. After another change of ownership, it finally came to the Hillcrest Lumber Company, where it served from 1936 to 1968. It was then used a few more times for special trips and today it is on display at the British Columbia Forest Discovery Center in Duncan.

General
Built1915
ManufacturerClimax
Axle config0-4-4-0T (Climax) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length33 ft 5 15/16 in
Empty weight88,000 lbs
Service weight100,000 lbs
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Starting effort13,239 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter31.3 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 13 x 16 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
Climax
geared steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 04/2022
T.L. Hackney Lumber Co. No. 1 (Shay A-8-2)
United States | 1885 | only one produced

The smallest design of the Shay, referred to as Class A, was available in different sizes between 6 and 24 tons. One of the oldest engines had the serial number 131 and was built in 1885 for the logging company T.L. Hackney in Texas. It had a service weight of nine short tons and was built for a gauge of 36 inches. The boiler was still arranged vertically and instead of a driver's cab there was only a large roof without side panels. After its service life at T.L. Hackney it came to the Rusk Iron Works, also in Texas

General
Built1885
ManufacturerLima
Axle config0-4-4-0T (Shay) 
Gauge3 ft 0 in (Three feet)
Dimensions and Weights
Empty weight10,000 lbs
Service weight18,000 lbs
Adhesive weight18,000 lbs
Water capacity400 us gal
Fuel capacity2,240 lbs (wood)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Top speed15 mph
Starting effort1,339 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter26 in
Boiler pressure80 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 8 x 8 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
Shay
geared steam locomotive
narrow gauge
freight
last changed: 04/2022
Waimanalo Sugar Co. “Olomana”
Hawaii | 1883 | only one produced
In the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
In the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
Derek Ramsey

The “Olomana” is a small tank locomotive shipped to Hawaii from Baldwin in 1883 and used by the Waimanalo Sugar Co. to haul sugar cane from the plantations to the refinery. It is generally considered the third self-propelled vehicle in Hawaii. It had the wheel arrangement 0-4-2T and a saddle tank. The initially coal-fired locomotive was converted to oil-firing in 1928 after an unsuccessful attempt to use sugar cane as fuel. In 1944 it and its sisters were retired and replaced with trucks.

The locomotive only became famous after it returned to the US mainland in 1948. It came to Hollywood and was used on the private Grizzly Flats Railroad. In 1952 and 1953 it was first restored and converted to wood firing. In the following time it was operated several times by Walt Disney and influenced him noticeably. In 1977 it was donated to the Smithsonian Museum, from where it came to the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasburg in 1999.

General
Built1883
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config0-4-2ST 
Gauge3 ft (Three feet)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight18,000 lbs
Fuel capacityoil
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power75 hp (56 kW)
Optimal speed20 mph
Starting effort2,430 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter24 in
Boiler pressure140 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 7 x 10 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
tank locomotive
freight
switcher
narrow gauge
last changed: 07/2023
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