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Tank Locomotives 0-4-2T “Olomana”[Inhalt]
UIC Classification B1 and B1'
Isle of Wight Central No. 3 “Mill Hill”
Great Britain | 1870 | only one produced
Locomotive Magazine, January 1901

One of the founding members of the Isle of Wight Central was the Cowes and Newport Railway, which had been established in 1859 and operated a 4.5 mile line to the north of the line along the River Medina. In 1970 Black, Hawthorn & Co. in Gateshead-on-Tyne built a small tank locomotive with a saddle tank, which was later to be number 3 in the combined railway company.

State after the rebuild where a cab was added
State after the rebuild where a cab was added
Locomotive Magazine, December 1921

After the Medina Wharf was built in 1877 and 1878, the engine spent much of its life there as a shunter. Later, a rebuild took place, in which the simple weather protection was replaced by a driver's cab. When passenger service with steam rail motors was opened up for Medina Wharf staff, the “Mill Hill” was used along with a six-axle passenger car as backup. The locomotive was decommissioned in 1913 and sold in 1918 to Holloway Bros. who operated a dock at Middlesbrough.

General
Built1870
ManufacturerBlack, Hawthorn & Co.
Axle config0-4-2ST 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase10 ft 3 in
Fixed wheelbase10 ft 3 in
Water capacity480 us gal
Fuel capacity1,500 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power120 hp (89 kW)
Power Plant
Driver diameter39 in
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 10 x 17 in
Boiler
Firebox area32 sq ft
Tube heating area272 sq ft
Evaporative heating area304 sq ft
Total heating area304 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
tank locomotive
secondary line
passenger
freight
switcher
last changed: 06/2022
London, Brighton & South Coast Craven South London Tanks
Great Britain | 1865 | 10 produced
No. 213 after being renumbered to 414 in March 1880
No. 213 after being renumbered to 414 in March 1880
collection Dave Searle
No. 212
No. 212
Locomotive Magazine, August 1897
No. 214 after being renumbered to 369 in May 1878
No. 214 after being renumbered to 369 in May 1878
Locomotive Magazine, October 1897
No. 230
No. 230
Locomotive Magazine, November 1897
No. 231
No. 231
collection Dave Searle
No. 231
No. 231
Locomotive Magazine, December 1897

A total of ten small tank locomotives were grouped together under the name "South London Tanks", which showed a few differences and were built by Craven for operation in the southern suburbs of London. The first was number 212, built in July 1865 and intended for the line between South Croydon and Victoria station. It had an inner frame with inside cylinders and water tanks on the sides and under the cab. Since the tanks had a total capacity of only 645 gallons, in July 1868 another 155 gallon tank was integrated into the front of the frame, extending brlow the cylinders.

Also in July 1865 followed number 213, which now had an outer frame and belonged to a standard Craven type. It was slightly heavier than the 212, but only had a cylinder diameter of 15 instead of 16 inches. The 214 and 215 followed in November, which had a total of three water tanks in the frame instead of the side tanks. Otherwise they had a lot in common with the 213. In April 1866 Nos. 17 and 216 to 218 were built, again largely the identical to the 213 and having side tanks but with larger water and coal supplies.

Number 230, which was completed in October 1866, showed greater differences. The wheel sets were hinged in an inner frame, while there was still an outer subframe. It had a larger boiler and, like the 212, a cylinder diameter of 16 inches. The 231 delivered in the same month showed even greater differences, which had a bogie instead of a trailing axle due to significantly increased stocks.

Most engines have been renumbered over the course of their service life. There were no major modifications to the locomotives. However, they were only expected to have a relatively short life, as all were scrapped in the first half of the 1880s.

Variant212213230231
General
Built18651866
ManufacturerBrighton
Axle config0-4-2T 0-4-4T (Forney) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length24 ft 3 in25 ft 1 in25 ft 2 1/2 in
Wheelbase14 ft 3 in15 ft 10 in14 ft 4 in22 ft
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 3 in15 ft 10 in14 ft 4 in7 ft 3 in
Service weight75,040 lbs81,536 lbs79,408 lbs
Adhesive weight53,312 lbs55,104 lbs53,872 lbs58,240 lbs
Axle load28,000 lbs29,792 lbs27,216 lbs31,360 lbs
Water capacity775 us gal963 us gal1,110 us gal
Fuel capacity2,912 lbs (coal)2,800 lbs (coal)coal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power300 hp (224 kW)325 hp (242 kW)350 hp (261 kW)
Power Plant
Driver diameter60 in
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 16 x 20 intwo, 15 x 20 intwo, 16 x 20 in
Boiler
Firebox area86 sq ft90 sq ft
Tube heating area829 sq ft840 sq ft
Evaporative heating area915 sq ft930 sq ft
Total heating area915 sq ft930 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
John Chester Craven
last changed: 09/2022
Saxon IIIb T
German Reichsbahn class 9872
Germany | 1875 | 42 produced
No. 634 “Dioptas”, formerly Muldenthal Railway Company
No. 634 “Dioptas”, formerly Muldenthal Railway Company
works photo Hartmann

The Royal Saxon State Railways combined two types of local railway tank locomotives as IIIb T, which had the wheel arrangement 0-4-2T and were similar in structure. Another similarity was the fact that about half of the engines had originally been procured by very short-lived private railways, but later came to the state railways.

A series was ordered in 1875 by the Muldenthal railway company from Schwartzkopff in Berlin. The locomotives were used on the 83 km long branch line between Glauchau and Wurzen until the line and vehicles were ceded to the state railways in 1878 due to financial difficulties. Further locomotives were ordered by the Chemnitz-Aue-Adorfer Eisenbahn-Gesellschaft from the Sächsische Maschinenfabrik in Chemnitz. Their area of operation was the 115 km long line from Chemnitz via Aue to Adorf, as well as a 9 km long branch line from Zwotental to Klingenthal. This railway company was merged into the state railways in 1876 after only four years of existence.

Between 1889 and 1892, the Saxon State Railways had twenty more units made in three series, which were more powerful than their predecessors. They were characterized by a boiler pressure of ten instead of nine bars and were about 20 cm longer than their predecessors. A total of 42 pieces of the series now known as IIIb T were created. The Reichsbahn took over nine more of these locomotives, which became the class 9872. They were decommissioned by 1929, only one remained in service until 1934 as a works locomotive in the Reichsbahn repair shop in Leipzig.

General
Built1875, 1889-1892
ManufacturerBMAG, Hartmann
Axle config0-4-2T 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length28 ft 9 3/8 in
Wheelbase13 ft 2 11/16 in
Fixed wheelbase9 ft 2 1/4 in
Service weight91,712 lbs
Adhesive weight67,241 lbs
Axle load33,731 lbs
Water capacity951 us gal
Fuel capacity2,205 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power235 hp (175 kW)
Optimal speed12 mph
Top speed31 mph
Starting effort12,953 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter55.9 in
Boiler pressure145 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 16 5/16 x 22 in
Boiler
Grate area13.7 sq ft
Firebox area69.3 sq ft
Tube heating area753.7 sq ft
Evaporative heating area823 sq ft
Total heating area823 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
passenger
secondary line
tank locomotive
last changed: 01/2022
Waimanalo Sugar Co. “Olomana”
Hawaii | 1883 | only one produced
In the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
In the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
Derek Ramsey

The “Olomana” is a small tank locomotive shipped to Hawaii from Baldwin in 1883 and used by the Waimanalo Sugar Co. to haul sugar cane from the plantations to the refinery. It is generally considered the third self-propelled vehicle in Hawaii. It had the wheel arrangement 0-4-2T and a saddle tank. The initially coal-fired locomotive was converted to oil-firing in 1928 after an unsuccessful attempt to use sugar cane as fuel. In 1944 it and its sisters were retired and replaced with trucks.

The locomotive only became famous after it returned to the US mainland in 1948. It came to Hollywood and was used on the private Grizzly Flats Railroad. In 1952 and 1953 it was first restored and converted to wood firing. In the following time it was operated several times by Walt Disney and influenced him noticeably. In 1977 it was donated to the Smithsonian Museum, from where it came to the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasburg in 1999.

General
Built1883
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config0-4-2ST 
Gauge3 ft (Three feet)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight18,000 lbs
Fuel capacityoil
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power75 hp (56 kW)
Optimal speed20 mph
Starting effort2,430 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter24 in
Boiler pressure140 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 7 x 10 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
tank locomotive
freight
switcher
narrow gauge
last changed: 07/2023
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