loco-info.com
The reference for locomotives and railcars
Navigation
Random
Search
Compare
Settings

Navigation

Page views since 2023-01-26: 261062
Other Steam Locomotives from the East Coast of the USA[Inhalt]
Baldwin No. 60000
United States | 1926 | only one produced

The Baldwin locomotive with the works number 60000 was a prototype that was built at their own expense in 1926 and with which the company wanted to set the course for locomotive construction of the future. It had the 4-10-2 wheel arrangement and a three-cylinder compound engine with three cylinders of the same size, the inner one serving as high-pressure cylinder.

What was special about the boiler was that the sides of the firebox were made of four-inch water pipes. They were connected at the top with 26-inch horizontal pipes that continued into the boiler barrel. The pressure was 350 psi (24.1 bars), which was significantly higher than conventional locomotives. In addition, a Worthington 4-BL feedwater heater was used.

The 60000 was intended to pull trains of up to 7,000 short tons and achieved an output of 4,515 hp at the drawbar. It was loaned to the PRR, B&O, Burlington Route, ATSF and Southern Pacific for trials and was even temporarily converted to oil firing by the SP. Although it performed very well and pulled up to 7,700 short tons, the railroads found the maintenance too expensive and no orders were placed. Today the 60000 is in the Franklin Institute Science Museum in Philadelphia.

General
Built1926
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config4-10-2 (Reid Tenwheeler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase45 ft 2 in
Fixed wheelbase22 ft 10 in
Total wheelbase86 ft 11 1/4 in
Service weight457,500 lbs
Adhesive weight338,400 lbs
Total weight700,900 lbs
Axle load68,000 lbs
Water capacity12,000 us gal
Fuel capacity32,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power5,200 hp (3,878 kW)
Optimal speed30 mph
Top speed70 mph
Starting effort109,293 lbf
with start valve131,152 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63.5 in
Boiler pressure350 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersthree, HP: 27 x 32 in
and LP: 27 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area82.5 sq ft
Firebox area772 sq ft
Tube heating area4,420 sq ft
Evaporative heating area5,192 sq ft
Superheater area1,357 sq ft
Total heating area6,549 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
prototype
last changed: 12/2023
East Broad Top No. 12
United States | 1911 | only one produced
In June 1961 in Rockhill Furnace, Pennsylvania
In June 1961 in Rockhill Furnace, Pennsylvania
collection Taylor Rush

The East Broad Top operated six Mikados, all of which survive to this day. The oldest of these is No. 12, which was christened “Millie”. Like her newer sisters, she had 48-inch diameter drivers, but was lighter and had smaller cylinders. When the EBT was reopened in 1960 as a complete heritage railway with all its equipment, number 12 remained in service with three of her sisters until she had to be retired in 2000 due to wear and tear. After the railroad had reopened in 2020 under new ownership, the locomotive remains inoperable and it remains to be seen if she will be refurbished.

General
Built1911
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config2-8-2 (Mikado) 
Gauge3 ft (Three feet)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase26 ft 2 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft
Total wheelbase48 ft 10 1/2 in
Service weight112,000 lbs
Adhesive weight88,000 lbs
Total weight172,000 lbs
Axle load22,000 lbs
Water capacity3,000 us gal
Fuel capacity12,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power800 hp (597 kW)
Optimal speed23 mph
Starting effort22,108 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter48 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area32.2 sq ft
Firebox area110 sq ft
Tube heating area1,576 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,686 sq ft
Total heating area1,686 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
narrow gauge
last changed: 08/2023
Florida East Coast class 801
developed from USRA Heavy Mountain
United States | 1926 | 23 produced
The Florida East Coast Class 801 is a direct descendant of the USRA Heavy Mountain
The Florida East Coast Class 801 is a direct descendant of the USRA Heavy Mountain

The last steam locomotives that the Florida East Coast purchased new were 23 copies of the USRA Heavy Mountain. They were delivered by ALCO-Schenectady in 1926 and were numbered 801 to 823. After the Mountains of the classes 301 and 401, they were significantly heavier. In direct comparison with the 401, they had a larger boiler and larger cylinders, but smaller drivers for greater pulling power. After three were lost by 1952 due to boiler explosion or accident, the remaining 20 were scrapped in 1954.

General
Built1926
ManufacturerALCO
Axle config4-8-2 (Mountain) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase41 ft 1 in
Fixed wheelbase18 ft
Total wheelbase82 ft 8 1/2 in
Service weight356,000 lbs
Adhesive weight224,500 lbs
Total weight611,900 lbs
Axle load61,300 lbs
Water capacity12,000 us gal
Fuel capacity5,000 us gal (oil)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,200 hp (2,386 kW)
Optimal speed35 mph
Starting effort57,948 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 28 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area75.3 sq ft
Firebox area395 sq ft
Tube heating area4,619 sq ft
Evaporative heating area5,014 sq ft
Superheater area1,477 sq ft
Total heating area6,491 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
last changed: 04/2024
Jeffersonville, Madison & Indianapolis “Reuben Wells”
United States | 1868 | 2 produced

With the 5.89 percent grade on Madison Hill in Indiana, the Jeffersonville, Madison & Indianapolis operated the steepest line in the United States that has ever been operated in adhesion mode. After the 1.3-mile line was initially horse-powered and briefly operated as a rack railway, Reuben Wells developed a pusher locomotive for adhesion service.

The five-axle tank locomotive was the most powerful locomotive in the world at the time it was put into service. Sufficient adhesive weight was achieved by the fact that all five axles were driven, which made the “Reuben Wells” the first five-coupled locomotive ever. With a driver diameter of only 44 inches, a starting tractive effort of more than 25.000 pounds could be achieved. A special identifying feature were the cylindrical water tanks, which started directly behind the smoke box and went to the rear end of the locomotive.

A year later, a second, identical locomotive with the name “M.G. Bright” was built. The “Reuben Wells” was rebuilt into an 0-8-0T in 1886, shortening it a bit and reducing the supplies. It served in this form until 1898 and was then initially stored. In 1966 it was acquired by the Children's Museum in Indianapolis and transferred to Indianapolis 100 years after she was commissioned.

General
Built1868
ManufacturerJeffersonville, Madison & Indianapolis
Axle config0-10-0T (Ten-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase21 ft
Fixed wheelbase21 ft
Service weight112,000 lbs
Adhesive weight112,000 lbs
Water capacity1,800 us gal
Fuel capacity6,720 lbs (wood)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power400 hp (298 kW)
Optimal speed10 mph
Starting effort25,330 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter44 in
Boiler pressure130 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 20 1/2 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area15.8 sq ft
Firebox area116 sq ft
Tube heating area1,263 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,379 sq ft
Total heating area1,379 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
passenger
tank locomotive
prototype
Reuben Wells
last changed: 06/2022
Atlanta & West Point class P-74
United States | 1926 | 2 produced
collection Josh Scott

The closely linked Atlanta & West Point and the Western Railway of Alabama had to pull the Southern Railway's "Crescent" between Atlanta, Georgia and Montgomery, Alabama. So they each ordered one locomotive, which was given the numbers 290 (AWP) and 190 (WRA). Like the Southern Ps-4, they were based on the USRA Heavy Pacific, but like them also had smaller drivers. The diameter was initially 73 inches and was later increased to 74 inches with thicker tires, which explains the designation P-74.

Both machines were operated together. While one hauled the northbound Crescent, the other simultaneously took over the southbound one. They were retired in 1954, after which the 190 was scrapped. The 290 was saved by the “290 club”, but remained non-operational for the time being. It was finally refurbished between 1986 and 1989 and was used until 1992, when maintenance work on the running gear was required. It now resides at the Southeastern Railway Museum in Duluth, Georgia, awaiting visual restoration.

General
Built1926
ManufacturerLima
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase37 ft
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Total wheelbase72 ft 5 in
Service weight303,500 lbs
Adhesive weight192,500 lbs
Total weight504,000 lbs
Axle load64,500 lbs
Water capacity11,000 us gal
Fuel capacity30,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,200 hp (2,386 kW)
Optimal speed44 mph
Starting effort46,892 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter74 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 27 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area70.8 sq ft
Firebox area327 sq ft
Tube heating area3,342 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,669 sq ft
Superheater area990 sq ft
Total heating area4,659 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 01/2024
Little River Railroad No. 110
United States | 1911 | only one produced

The Little River Railroad in Tennessee had steep grades which also had tight curves at the same time. In 1911, Baldwin delivered the number 110 to them for their passenger trains, which was built with an extra short wheelbase and is considered the smallest standard-gauge Pacific in the world. It has a large grate for burning low-quality coal, but no brick arch and no superheater

It pulled the “Elkmont Special,” which started in Knoxville until 1938, when the Little River became a pure logging railroad again. The 110 was now purchased by the Smoky Mountain Railroad and pulled freight trains there until 1954. Since 1976 it has been running on the new Little River Railroad, which is based in Michigan. It is still used there today as the flagship of this heritage railroad.

General
Built1911
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase23 ft 4 in
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 4 in
Service weight109,000 lbs
Adhesive weight72,000 lbs
Total weight199,000 lbs
Axle load24,000 lbs
Water capacity3,500 us gal
Fuel capacity12,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power800 hp (597 kW)
Optimal speed28 mph
Starting effort18,334 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter47 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 16 x 22 in
Boiler
Grate area30 sq ft
Firebox area100 sq ft
Tube heating area1,562 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,662 sq ft
Total heating area1,662 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
secondary line
last changed: 02/2024
loading...

We use cookies to save the following settings:

  • selected navigation structure
  • selected language
  • preferred units
  • spelling of railway company names

If you refuse the use of cookies, the settings will only be retained for the current session and will be reset to the default values the next time you visit the site.

Display of units

Here you can set the desired unit system for the technical data.

  • Metric: Lengths in meters, weights in tonnes, and volumes in cubic meters
  • Imperial (UK): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in long tons and volumes in imperial gallons
  • Imperial (US): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in pounds, and volumes in US gallons
  • Individual: Depends on the country of origin of each locomotive
Operator names

Here you can set the display of railway company names.

  • Short: Abbreviation or short form of the name
  • Standard: commonly used name, partially translated to English
  • Complete: full name in local language