loco-info.com
The reference for locomotives and railcars
Navigation
Random
Search
Compare
Settings
Tender Locomotives 2-8-4 “Berkshire”[Inhalt]
UIC Classification 1'D2'
Boston & Maine class T-1
United States | 1928 | 25 produced
T-1a Nr. 4008 im April 1939 in Billerica, Massachusetts
T-1a Nr. 4008 im April 1939 in Billerica, Massachusetts
Edward R. Batson, Jr. / Boston & Mayne Historical Society archivees

In 1928, the Boston & Maine initially procured 20 Berkshire-type locomotives near Lima. This meant a leading axle, four coupled axles and a two-axle bogie under the firebox. Thanks to the bogie, a grate area of exactly 100 square feet was possible. After the 20 engines of the T-1a class, another five were procured in the following year as the T-1b class. These were slightly heavier than the T-1a, which were later upgraded to the same level.

Because the adhesive weight was relatively low compared to the engine, the maximum cutoff was set at 60 percent. The actually achieved starting tractive force therefore deviates from the result of the formula usually used, as this assumes a cutoff of 85 percent. An additional 12,000 pounds of traction came from a booster driving the rear axle of the bogie. A special feature of the locomotives was the Coffin feedwater heater, which lay in a semicircle above the smokebox.

The locomotives were unpopular in operation, as the bogie was always the cause of problems. Because the weight of the firebox rested on it, high forces acted on the boiler when running through curves. In addition, the bogie tended to derail when reversing.

T-1a No. 4012 in August 1940 at North Pownal, Vermont with clearly visible coffin-type feedwater heater on the smoke box
T-1a No. 4012 in August 1940 at North Pownal, Vermont with clearly visible coffin-type feedwater heater on the smoke box
John P. Ahrens / collection Taylor Rush

In view of the problems, the Boston & Maine was able to sell ten engines to the Southern Pacific and seven to the Santa Fe during World War II. The Santa Fé gave the locomotives a rebuild that increased boiler pressure to 270 psi and used smaller diameter, longer stroke cylinders. These were able to prove themselves in service until 1954, while the others had already disappeared in 1949.

VariantT-1aT-1b
General
Built19281929
ManufacturerLima
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase41 ft 8 1/2 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 6 in
Service weight393,000 lbs406,900 lbs
Adhesive weight250,200 lbs261,800 lbs
Total weight609,400 lbs735,500 lbs
Axle load63,000 lbs65,900 lbs
Water capacity12,000 us gal17,500 us gal
Fuel capacity36,000 lbs (coal)46,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,400 hp (3,281 kW)4,700 hp (3,505 kW)
Optimal speed42 mph39 mph
Starting effort66,640 lbf76,160 lbf
Booster12,000 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure210 psi240 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 28 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area100 sq ft
Firebox area405 sq ft
Tube heating area4,728 sq ft
Evaporative heating area5,133 sq ft
Superheater area2,136 sq ft
Total heating area7,269 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
booster
last changed: 05/2022
Chesapeake & Ohio class K-4
United States | 1943 | 90 produced
No. 2748 in Columbus, Ohio
No. 2748 in Columbus, Ohio
collection Taylor Rush

In order to be able to cope with the increase in fast freight trains caused by the war, the C&O had locomotives built with the wheel arrangement 2-8-4. While this wheel arrangement is commonly known as “Berkshire” in North America, the C&O named it “Kanawha” after a river in West Virginia. The engineers called them "Big Mikes". They shared many similarities with the Pere Marquette N class, but were slightly heavier overall and had a tender with a larger amount of coal. By 1947, a total of 90 had been built by ALCO and Lima. They all had a booster in the trailing truck. They were used not only for fast freight trains, but also for passenger trains. The first of these locomotives were replaced by diesel locomotives as early as 1952, and by 1957 the last one had disappeared from active service. Twelve of these still exist today and number 2716 is being restored to working condition since 2019.

General
Built1943-1947
ManufacturerALCO, Lima
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length105 ft 2 in
Wheelbase42 ft
Fixed wheelbase18 ft 2 in
Total wheelbase93 ft 2 in
Service weight460,000 lbs
Adhesive weight292,000 lbs
Total weight848,000 lbs
Axle load73,800 lbs
Water capacity21,000 us gal
Fuel capacity60,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,475 hp (3,337 kW)
Optimal speed41 mph
Top speed70 mph
Starting effort69,368 lbf
Booster14,000 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure245 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 26 x 34 in
Boiler
Grate area90.3 sq ft
Firebox area462 sq ft
Tube heating area4,311 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,773 sq ft
Superheater area1,932 sq ft
Total heating area6,705 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
passenger
last changed: 08/2023
Erie classes S-1 to S-4
United States | 1927 | 105 produced
S-4 No. 3397 in August 1936
S-4 No. 3397 in August 1936
George E. Votava / collection Taylor Rush

The Erie was the American railroad that ordered the greatest number of 2-8-4 “Berkshire” locomotives. These 105 locomotives were not only delivered by all three major manufacturers, but also had the biggest heating surface of all Berkshires. As usual for the late twenties, they were fitted with thermic syphons, arch tubes, Worthington feedwater heaters and had a limited cutoff.

25 of the class S-1 were built in 1927 by ALCO, followed by another 25 S-2 in the same year by Lima. 35 S-3 were built by Baldwin in 1928 and 20 S-4 again by Lima in 1929. Both Lima subclasses were designed for a boiler pressure of 250 psi, but operated at only 225 psi like their sisters. These classes made it possible for the Erie to greatly accelerate their freight services and they were all scrapped between 1950 and 1952.

VariantS-1S-2S-3S-4
General
Built192719281929
ManufacturerALCOLimaBaldwinLima
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase42 ft44 ft
Fixed wheelbase18 ft 3 in
Total wheelbase86 ft 2 in86 ft 7 in91 ft 7 in91 ft 6 1/2 in
Service weight443,000 lbs457,500 lbs468,600 lbs
Adhesive weight276,000 lbs281,000 lbs284,670 lbs286,500 lbs
Total weight753,000 lbs787,500 lbs827,950 lbs846,600 lbs
Axle load71,000 lbs70,800 lbs71,700 lbs72,000 lbs
Water capacity16,500 us gal20,750 us gal20,800 us gal
Fuel capacity48,000 lbs (coal)54,000 lbs (coal)56,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,800 hp (3,579 kW)5,100 hp (3,803 kW)4,800 hp (3,579 kW)5,100 hp (3,803 kW)
Optimal speed43 mph41 mph43 mph41 mph
Starting effort71,014 lbf78,904 lbf71,014 lbf78,904 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter70 in
Boiler pressure225 psi250 psi225 psi250 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 28 1/2 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area100 sq ft
Firebox area449 sq ft448 sq ft437 sq ft449 sq ft
Tube heating area5,250 sq ft5,249 sq ft5,254 sq ft5,246 sq ft
Evaporative heating area5,699 sq ft5,697 sq ft5,691 sq ft5,695 sq ft
Superheater area2,448 sq ft2,480 sq ft2,545 sq ft
Total heating area8,147 sq ft8,177 sq ft8,171 sq ft8,240 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 04/2024
Japanese National Railways class D60
Japan | 1951 | 78 produced
D60 1 on display at the Yamaguchi Museum
D60 1 on display at the Yamaguchi Museum
663highland

In order to reduce the axle load of the trailing axle of the D50 class with a 2-8-2 wheel arrangement, a two-axle bogie was installed in its place from 1951. Along with other modifications, the D60 class was created. The D51 class was converted into the D61 class and the D52 class into the D62 class in the same way. In addition, the cylinder diameter had been reduced from 570 to 550 mm to reduce the tendency to slip. The locomotives were retired between 1966 and 1974. Four have survived to this day.

General
Built1951-1956
ManufacturerHamamatsu
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge3 ft 6 in (Cape gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length65 ft 8 9/16 in
Wheelbase33 ft 7 9/16 in
Fixed wheelbase15 ft 5 7/16 in
Total wheelbase56 ft 7 15/16 in
Service weight179,809 lbs
Adhesive weight120,549 lbs
Total weight287,835 lbs
Axle load30,137 lbs
Water capacity4,491 us gal
Fuel capacity26,455 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,408 hp (1,050 kW)
Optimal speed26 mph
Top speed43 mph
Starting effort34,873 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter55.1 in
Boiler pressure186 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 21 5/8 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area35 sq ft
Firebox area163.6 sq ft
Tube heating area1,312.1 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,475.7 sq ft
Superheater area809.4 sq ft
Total heating area2,285.2 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 03/2023
Nickel Plate Road classes S to S-3
United States | 1934 | 80 produced
S-3 No. 775 in August 1956 at Cleveland, Ohio
S-3 No. 775 in August 1956 at Cleveland, Ohio
Len Hillyard / collection Taylor Rush
S-2 No. 765 in May 2013
S-2 No. 765 in May 2013
Ron Shawley

The C&O T-1 class with the 2-10-4 wheel arrangement was developed from the Erie 2-8-4. Lima reduced this again by one driving axle and thus created the class S of the NKP. In the years between 1934 and 1949, a total of 80 class S, S-1, S-2 and S-3 locomotives were built, which shone with exceptional performance and pulled fast freight trains. They produced around 4,500 hp and were designed for speeds of 70 mph. They were scrapped between 1957 and 1964. Today there are still six preserved. The best known is the 765, which runs fully booked special trips on a regular basis. The 779, which still exists today, was Lima's last steam locomotive built in 1949.

VariantS, S-1S-2S-3
General
Built1934, 1942-194319441949
ManufacturerALCO, Lima
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length100 ft 8 11/16 in
Wheelbase42 ft
Fixed wheelbase18 ft 3 in
Total wheelbase87 ft 8 1/4 in
Service weight428,500 lbs440,800 lbs444,300 lbs
Adhesive weight251,100 lbs254,300 lbs266,000 lbs
Total weight784,500 lbs802,500 lbs808,820 lbs
Axle load62,775 lbs63,575 lbs66,500 lbs
Water capacity22,000 us gal
Fuel capacity44,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power4,500 hp (3,356 kW)
Optimal speed45 mph
Top speed70 mph
Starting effort64,135 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure245 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 25 x 34 in
Boiler
Grate area90.3 sq ft
Firebox area460 sq ft
Tube heating area4,314 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,774 sq ft
Superheater area1,993 sq ft1,992 sq ft1,993 sq ft
Total heating area6,767 sq ft6,766 sq ft6,767 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 07/2023
Norwegian State Railways type 49 “Dovregubben”
Norway | 1935 | 7 produced
Type 49b No. 465 with clearly visible booster coupling rod
Type 49b No. 465 with clearly visible booster coupling rod
Norsk Jernbaneklubb

The NSB had the largest and most powerful steam locomotives ever used in Norway built to operate the increasingly heavier express trains on the steeply graded Dovre Railway. They became known by the nickname “Dovregubben”. They were built in the 2-8-4 design in order to achieve a high tractive force in addition to be able to accommodate a large firebox, with which a large steam production could be maintained on long inclines. Since high speeds could not be run on the route and traction was more important, the driving wheels were designed with a diameter of just 1,530 mm and a top speed of 90 km/h was enough. Since the total length was also limited due to the existing turntables, the smaller driving wheels also made it possible to accommodate the four driving axles. These were necessary in order to be able to maintain the maximum axle load of 15.5 tonnes on the mountain routes. The engine was designed with four cylinders and compound action.

The first two machines, later designated type 49a, were delivered by Hamar and Thune in June and September 1935. Despite the small wheels, one reached 115 km/h at a press tour. The pronounced lightweight construction of the entire locomotive led to problems in some places, which was improved by adapting some parts. The one-off type 49b, which was also built in Norway, followed the next year. The bogie had an engageable booster with drive on both axles in order to provide additional tractive power for starting and on steep inclines.

Two of the Type 49c were delivered by Krupp in 1940 and two by Thunes in 1941. These had no booster and were similar to the 49a, but with some detail improvements. This included making the cylinders smaller in order to save weight and to strengthen the axles at the same time. Seven more were destroyed in a bombing raid on the Krupp factory in World War II, four others were never completed in Norway and were used as spare parts donors.

Sectional drawing of type 49c
Sectional drawing of type 49c
Die Lokomotive, September 1941

Due to the four cylinders, the locomotives were very demanding in terms of maintenance, but were able to fully convince in terms of their performance and economy. The economy was even certified in Germany by the Grunewald Locomotive Testing facility during tests with one of the locomotives built by Krupp. When the NSB introduced the Di 3 diesel locomotives, they were initially used together with the type 49. It quickly became apparent that the steam locomotives could maintain their speed much better on long inclines than the diesel locomotives with 1,900 hp. However, since the latter were much easier to maintain, all type 49 were retired by 1958.

Variant49a49b49c
General
Built193519361940-1941
ManufacturerHamar Jernstøberi, ThunesKrupp, Thunes
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length72 ft 2 1/8 in73 ft 0 15/16 in
Wheelbase37 ft 11 1/8 in
Fixed wheelbase11 ft 0 5/16 in
Total wheelbase60 ft 5 3/8 in61 ft 1 1/4 in
Empty weight192,243 lbs204,368 lbs195,329 lbs
Service weight217,155 lbs229,060 lbs218,257 lbs
Adhesive weight137,568 lbs138,450 lbs136,466 lbs
Total weight334,000 lbs345,905 lbs337,527 lbs
Axle load34,172 lbs34,613 lbs34,172 lbs
Water capacity7,185 us gal7,212 us gal
Fuel capacity18,519 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power2,564 hp (1,912 kW)2,288 hp (1,706 kW)
Optimal speed38 mph39 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort43,026 lbf37,493 lbf
with start valve51,631 lbf44,992 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter60.2 in
Boiler pressure247 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 18 5/16 x 25 9/16 in
and LP: 28 3/8 x 27 9/16 in
four, HP: 17 5/16 x 25 9/16 in
and LP: 25 9/16 x 27 9/16 in
Boiler
Grate area53.8 sq ft
Firebox area231.4 sq ft
Tube heating area2,524.1 sq ft2,534.9 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,755.6 sq ft2,766.3 sq ft
Superheater area1,097.9 sq ft
Total heating area3,853.5 sq ft3,864.2 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
passenger
freight
Von Borries compound
booster
last changed: 03/2024
Austrian Federal Railways (BBÖ) class 214
Austrian Federal Railways class 12 and Romanian Railway series 142
Austria, Romania | 1928 | 93 produced

At the end of the 1920s, the BBÖ tried to increase the average speeds of the ever-increasing train weights of 550 to 600 tonnes. Instead of further increasing the maximum speed in the lowlands, the aim was to significantly increase the speeds in the mountains. However, since the electrification of the Austrian routes did not progress as quickly as hoped, there was a need for powerful express steam locomotives. In order to be able to achieve a power similar to that of the electric locomotives of the time, exceptionally large locomotives were required.

Since Austria already had good experience with express locomotives with trailing bogies and a 2-6-4 wheel arrangement, locomotives with a 2-8-4 wheel arrangement were designed. Thanks to four driven axles, this allowed a high adhesive weight, but at the same time, thanks to the bogie, a long and wide firebox. Due to the 1,940 mm wheels and the drive on the third coupled axle, the longest connecting rods ever installed on a steam locomotive were required. This record was not surpassed by any other locomotive later. The 114.01 with three cylinders and the 214.01 with two cylinders were built as prototypes.

Since the smooth running of the three-cylinder locomotive was offset by noticeably higher consumption, the 214 was selected as the series model. In 1931 and 1936 six were built at the Lokomotivfabrik Floridsdorf. They were the most powerful express locomotives in Europe and were used on the Westbahn as far as Passau. In trial runs, speeds of up to 155 km/h were reached. From 1938 they became the class 12 on the Deutsche Reichsbahn and kept this number later on at the ÖBB. After the western railway was electrified, they were used in the south of Austria, where there was greater wear and tear due to the tighter curve radii. As a result, the locomotives were no longer used for express trains after 1956 and were retired by 1962.

12.10 in 1972 at the ÖBB open day
12.10 in 1972 at the ÖBB open day
TARS631

The Romanian State Railways CFR acquired the license to build these machines and produced 79, which were designated as series 142 there. Today only the Austrian 12.10 and the Romanian 142.063 exist, neither of which have been preserved in working order. The latter was bought by the Austrian Society for Railway History (ÖGEG) in the 1980s and given the originally unassigned number 12.14.

General
Built1928-1939
ManufacturerFloridsdorf, Reșița
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length74 ft 1 in
Length loco49 ft 4 1/8 in
Empty weight235,894 lbs
Service weight260,145 lbs
Adhesive weight158,733 lbs
Total weight392,422 lbs
Axle load39,683 lbs
Water capacity7,793 us gal
Fuel capacity17,637 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power2,899 hp (2,162 kW)
Optimal speed41 mph
Top speed68 mph
Starting effort44,955 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter76.4 in
Boiler pressure218 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 25 9/16 x 28 3/8 in
Boiler
Grate area50.8 sq ft
Firebox area202.4 sq ft
Tube heating area2,849.2 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,051.6 sq ft
Superheater area979.5 sq ft
Total heating area4,031.1 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 01/2022
Pere Marquette classes N to N2
United States | 1937 | 39 produced
No. 1225 marked “Polar Express” in December 2004 in Henderson, Michigan
No. 1225 marked “Polar Express” in December 2004 in Henderson, Michigan
Stephen Wilder

For use in front of fast freight trains, the Pere Marquette also chose the 2-8-4 “Berkshire” wheel arrangement in the late 1930s. It was able to develop great power at speeds of up to 70 mph thanks to the large firebox above the bogie. Of a total of 466 square feet in the firebox, 122 were made up of thermosiphons and water pipes. This allowed 26 by 34 inch cylinders to be operated with 69 inch wheels.

The first delivery from 1937 included 15 class N locomotives. The last five of these had a booster in the bogie. In the years 1941 and 1944 twelve more N1 and N2 each followed. When the Pere Marquette was merged into the Chesapeake & Ohio in 1947, the N1 and N2 classes became the N-1 and N-2 and the N class became the N-3. The two newer series, which had not yet been paid for by the C&O, kept the color scheme and the old numbers.

From 1951 the locomotives were also used on routes other than those originally operated by the Pere Marquette. The first series was scrapped by 1954. The use of the newer machines ended in 1958 and a total of 13 units were stored until 1961, as payments were still outstanding.

Numbers 1223 and 1225 are still preserved today, both of which belong to class N1. The 1225 is the only still functional Pere Marquette locomotive today. It has been used intermittently since 1985 and formed the basis for the locomotive in the book and film “The Polar Express”. Today it is used almost every year around Christmas time on the “North Pole Express” in Michigan.

General
Built1937, 1941, 1944
ManufacturerLima
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length101 ft 8 3/8 in
Wheelbase42 ft
Fixed wheelbase18 ft 2 1/2 in
Total wheelbase88 ft 2 3/4 in
Service weight442,500 lbs
Adhesive weight277,600 lbs
Total weight805,900 lbs
Axle load69,400 lbs
Water capacity22,000 us gal
Fuel capacity44,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,500 hp (3,356 kW)
Optimal speed41 mph
Top speed70 mph
Starting effort69,368 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure245 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 26 x 34 in
Boiler
Grate area90.3 sq ft
Firebox area466 sq ft
Tube heating area4,311 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,777 sq ft
Superheater area1,932 sq ft
Total heating area6,709 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 02/2023
Soviet Railways series ИС
later series ФДП
Soviet Union | 1932 | 649 produced

At the beginning of the thirties, the SŽD commissioned a locomotive for heavy passenger trains that had an axle load of 20 tonnes and a driver diameter of 1,850 mm. As wheel arrangement, 2-8-4 was chosen, which was used in the USA for fast freight trains, and the locomotive was named “ИС 20” (IS 20) after Josef Stalin, where the 20 stood for the axle load in tonnes. It was based on the 2-10-2 freight locomotive ФД (FD) and used the same boiler as well as other components from it.

It was the largest passenger steam locomotive in Europe at the time, but didn't show good running characteristics in curves at high speeds. From 1941 onwards, eleven locomotives were built with a larger superheater, which had an axle load of 21 tonnes and were therefore referred to as ИС 21. As part of the de-Stalinization, the ИС was renamed ФДП in 1962, which distinguished it as a passenger variant of the ФД. The last ones were in use until 1972.

VariantИС 20ИС 21
General
Built1932-19411941-1942
ManufacturerKolomna, Lugansk, Ulan-Ude
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge4 ft 11 13/16 in (Russian broad gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length loco53 ft 8 5/16 in
Wheelbase41 ft 4 1/4 in
Fixed wheelbase19 ft 2 5/16 in
Empty weight260,145 lbs
Service weight293,214 lbs299,828 lbs
Adhesive weight177,913 lbs180,779 lbs
Axle load44,533 lbs45,195 lbs
Water capacity8,718 us gal12,944 us gal
Fuel capacity26,455 lbs (coal)48,502 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power3,158 hp (2,355 kW)3,165 hp (2,360 kW)
Optimal speed38 mph
Top speed71 mph
Starting effort53,565 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter72.8 in
Boiler pressure218 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 26 3/8 x 30 5/16 in
Boiler
Grate area75.8 sq ft
Firebox area336.2 sq ft
Tube heating area2,840.9 sq ft2,330.1 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,177.1 sq ft2,666.2 sq ft
Superheater area1,329.3 sq ft1,597.4 sq ft
Total heating area4,506.4 sq ft4,263.6 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
last changed: 11/2023
Brazil National Railways class 142N
Brazil | 1951 | 66 produced
Schematic drawing with dimensions
Schematic drawing with dimensions
Locomotive Magazine, June 1953

Around 1950, André Chapelon developed two modern locomotive types with the 2-8-4 and 4-8-4 wheel arrangements for several Brazilian railway companies. While the machine shown here was designated 142N, the larger one was designated 242N. The 142N was developed for a maximum axle load of around ten tonnes and was designed to burn lignite or wood. It was used in mixed service.

Despite the meter gauge, the locomotives were all modern in design. In order to achieve enough power with the fuels used, they had a large firebox with thermic syphons. The superheater could reach temperatures of up to 380°C. Depending on the operator, different tenders were used, some of which had six axles.

The 66 locomotives were built by an export consortium called “GELSA”, which in this case involved Fives-Lille, Schneider-Creusot and Cail. In reality, it turned out that the curves with radii down to 50 meters were narrower than expected, for which the locomotives were not really suitable. That's why they were rather unpopular with the crews, who called them “too modern”. Instead, the old British locomotives were often preferred.

General
Built1951-1952
ManufacturerGELSA
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge3 ft 3 3/8 in (Meter gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length71 ft 1 3/8 in
Wheelbase30 ft 1 7/16 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 5 13/16 in
Total wheelbase60 ft 6 3/8 in
Service weight154,323 lbs
Adhesive weight89,067 lbs
Total weight314,710 lbs
Axle load22,267 lbs
Water capacity4,702 us gal
Fuel capacity26,455 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power1,381 hp (1,030 kW)
Optimal speed37 mph
Top speed37 mph
Starting effort23,812 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter50 in
Boiler pressure218 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 1/16 x 22 1/16 in
Boiler
Grate area43.1 sq ft
Firebox area212 sq ft
Tube heating area1,103.7 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,315.8 sq ft
Superheater area484.4 sq ft
Total heating area1,800.2 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
passenger
André Chapelon
narrow gauge
last changed: 04/2024
loading...

We use cookies to save the following settings:

  • selected navigation structure
  • selected language
  • preferred units
  • spelling of railway company names

If you refuse the use of cookies, the settings will only be retained for the current session and will be reset to the default values the next time you visit the site.

Display of units

Here you can set the desired unit system for the technical data.

  • Metric: Lengths in meters, weights in tonnes, and volumes in cubic meters
  • Imperial (UK): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in long tons and volumes in imperial gallons
  • Imperial (US): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in pounds, and volumes in US gallons
  • Individual: Depends on the country of origin of each locomotive
Operator names

Here you can set the display of railway company names.

  • Short: Abbreviation or short form of the name
  • Standard: commonly used name, partially translated to English
  • Complete: full name in local language