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Tender Locomotives 2-8-0 “Consolidation”[Inhalt]
UIC Classification 1'D
Badenian VIII e
Germany | 1908 | 70 produced
No. 780, first batch, around 1908
No. 780, first batch, around 1908

At the Baden State Railways, class VIII referred to eight-coupled freight locomotives. When the VIII a and VIII b no longer met current requirements, the VIII e was developed. It also had four coupled wheel sets, but the weight and thus the power could be increased by adding a leading axle. They were the first freight locomotives in Germany with a 2-8-0 wheel arrangement and a bar frame. The design came from Maffei in Munich, but only the first five of the 70 engines from a total of eight series were manufactured there. The rest were built by the local mechanical engineering company in Karlsruhe.

Austrian engineer Karl Gölsdorf was consulted to improve the curve running qualities, the second and fourth coupled wheel sets were installed so that they could be shifted sideways by 25 mm. The leading axle was an Adams axle that could be deflected by 65 mm. One of the features of the engines was the very high boiler, the center of which was 2,790 mm above the top of the rails. Due to the low height of the bar frame, there was a large gap between the boiler and the frame. This also made it possible to arrange the firebox above the coupled wheels and thus to dimension them generously.

Since the locomotives were intended for longer distances without many intermediate stops, a four-cylinder compound engine was installed. These were superheated steam locomotives, but the first five series were still fitted with a Clench steam dryer. All others were equipped with a smoke tube superheater, while the steam dryer was later removed from the first series and these were thus made into saturated steam locomotives.

Schematic drawing
Schematic drawing
Die Lokomotive, August 1925

The maximum speed of 65 km/h could be reached on the flat with trains of up to 700 tonnes, while a maximum train weight of 1,840 tonnes was possible at 45 km/h. 68 of the 70 engines were taken over by the Reichsbahn and classified as class 567. Their service life ended in 1931, since steam locomotives with a 2-10-0 wheel arrangement were now required for the heavy freight trains and these were also procured as standard locomotives.

Variant1908 variant1910 variant1913 variant
General
Built19081910-19121913-1915
ManufacturerMaffei, MBG KarlsruheMBG Karlsruhe
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length62 ft 8 15/16 in61 ft 7 1/2 in61 ft 8 5/16 in
Wheelbase24 ft 5 5/16 in
Fixed wheelbase10 ft 9 15/16 in
Total wheelbase52 ft 0 7/16 in
Empty weight155,205 lbs153,001 lbs
Service weight169,976 lbs166,008 lbs167,551 lbs
Adhesive weight144,403 lbs139,332 lbs141,096 lbs
Axle load36,156 lbs34,833 lbs35,274 lbs
Water capacity5,283 us gal
Fuel capacity15,432 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,140 hp (850 kW)1,106 hp (825 kW)1,274 hp (950 kW)
Optimal speed22 mph23 mph25 mph
Top speed40 mph
Starting effort32,616 lbf30,163 lbf31,872 lbf
with start valve39,139 lbf36,196 lbf38,246 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter53.2 in
Boiler pressure232 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 15 9/16 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 25 x 25 3/16 in
four, HP: 14 15/16 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 24 x 25 3/16 in
four, HP: 15 9/16 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 24 x 25 3/16 in
Boiler
Grate area40.4 sq ft38.2 sq ft
Firebox area139.9 sq ft127.9 sq ft127.6 sq ft
Tube heating area1,959 sq ft1,885.9 sq ft1,641.7 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,099 sq ft2,013.8 sq ft1,769 sq ft
Superheater area539.3 sq ft
Total heating area2,099 sq ft2,013.8 sq ft2,308.3 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
Von Borries compound
last changed: 01/2022
Baltimore & Ohio class E-27
United States | 1905 | 409 produced
E-27b No. 2899 in front of two Mikados of the Q-1aa class in December 1942 at Chillicothe, Ohio
E-27b No. 2899 in front of two Mikados of the Q-1aa class in December 1942 at Chillicothe, Ohio
James Bowie / collection Taylor Rush

The largest class of Consolidations built for the Baltimore & Ohio was the E-27. The intended area of service were heavy freight trains on both flat and mountainous routes. In order to keep the strain on the locomotive and tracks low, a driver diameter was chosen that was larger than on previous consolidations and at the same time a long cylinder stroke of 30 inches with a comparatively small diameter.

205 of the original E-27 were built in 1905 and 1906 at the ALCO plants in Schenectady and Richmond. The E-27b only followed in 1909 and was largely the same. Changes only affected the Walschaert valve gear and two-inch larger wheels. After 84 E-27b had been built, 120 more followed, which had a larger number of thinner diameter tubes in the boiler and were given the same designation.

When being superheated, different variants were created, which were given different class names. The differences here lay in the superheater, the cylinder dimensions and the valve gear. A total of 116 E-27 were rebuilt into class L-2 0-8-0 switchers. The last E-27 were retired in 1959.

VariantE-27E-27b - 1909E-27b - 1910rebuilt E-27ca. da
General
Built1905-19061909-19101910from 1920
ManufacturerALCOB&O
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase25 ft 7 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 8 in
Total wheelbase59 ft 8 in
Service weight208,500 lbs220,370 lbs220,300 lbs226,550 lbs
Adhesive weight185,900 lbs198,650 lbs195,580 lbs203,550 lbs
Total weight352,000 lbs368,440 lbs368,370 lbs374,620 lbs
Axle load46,475 lbs49,663 lbs48,895 lbs53,900 lbs
Water capacity7,000 us gal7,500 us gal7,000 us gal
Fuel capacity30,000 lbs (coal)36,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,650 hp (1,230 kW)1,675 hp (1,249 kW)1,950 hp (1,454 kW)
Optimal speed25 mph26 mph24 mph
Starting effort42,168 lbf40,808 lbf50,934 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter60 in62 in
Boiler pressure205 psi215 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 22 x 30 intwo, 24 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area56.2 sq ft57.1 sq ft56.2 sq ft
Firebox area179.3 sq ft
Tube heating area2,629.7 sq ft2,594.7 sq ft2,668.7 sq ft2,213.7 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,809 sq ft2,774 sq ft2,848 sq ft2,393 sq ft
Superheater area425 sq ft
Total heating area2,809 sq ft2,774 sq ft2,848 sq ft2,818 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
last changed: 12/2023
Bavarian G 4/5 H
German Reichsbahn class 568-11
Germany | 1915 | 230 produced
The 56 1117, one of the last examples, at the time of the Deutsche Reichsbahn
The 56 1117, one of the last examples, at the time of the Deutsche Reichsbahn

The G 4/5 H was a freight locomotive with a 2-8-0 wheel arrangement, which Maffei developed on the basis of the G 4/5 N, which was manufactured in smaller numbers. With its complex engine, it achieved the highest power of all German locomotives with this wheel arrangement. While the predecessor still had a two-cylinder saturated engine, the G 4/5 H was a superheated locomotive with four cylinders in compound design. This design was not very widespread among freight locomotives in Germany, but it increased the power compared to comparable models. This meant that 995 tonnes could be transported at 40 km/h on a gradient of 0.5 percent, as well as 535 tonnes at 1.4 percent at 30 km/h.

A very similar locomotive had already been delivered to the Baden State Railways as the VIII e a few years earlier. In contrast to this, all cylinders on the G 4/5 H acted on the second coupled axle. As with the VIII e, the use of a bar frame proved to be advantageous for maintenance, as this had a lower installation height than a plate frame of the same strength and thus facilitated access to the inner high-pressure cylinders. The leading axle was designed as an Adams axle, since other designs with a drawbar would have robbed the engine of the space.

Maffei produced 210 engines between 1915 and 1919, another 20 came from Krauss. Of these, ten went to the Military General Directorate in Brussels and 25 were ordered directly for use in the war. After the end of the war, 48 locomotives were given to France as reparations and 13 more to Belgium.

The Reichsbahn took over all remaining locomotives and numbered them as class 568-11. Despite their good performance, the locomotives were taken out of service as early as 1933, which in retrospect is partly due to the aversion of Richard Paul Wagner, head of the design department, to compound locomotives. Some of the other 2-8-0 freight locomotives with conventional engines survived considerably longer, despite being fewer in number. For the same reason, the Reichsbahn did not procure any new locomotives with compound engines, except for test purposes. After the war, depending on the source, there were still two or three vehicles, but they were withdrawn and scrapped in 1947. As a result, no G 4/5 H entered service with either of the two new German railway companies.

General
Built1915-1919
ManufacturerMaffei, Krauss
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length59 ft 10 1/2 in
Wheelbase23 ft 11 3/8 in
Fixed wheelbase15 ft 9 in
Total wheelbase49 ft 0 9/16 in
Empty weight152,119 lbs
Service weight167,551 lbs
Adhesive weight141,096 lbs
Total weight268,082 lbs
Axle load35,274 lbs
Water capacity5,336 us gal
Fuel capacity14,330 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,341 hp (1,000 kW)
Optimal speed26 mph
Top speed37 mph
Starting effort32,874 lbf
with start valve39,449 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter51.2 in
Boiler pressure232 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 15 3/4 x 24 in
and LP: 24 7/16 x 25 3/16 in
Boiler
Grate area35.5 sq ft
Firebox area129.2 sq ft
Tube heating area1,797.6 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,926.7 sq ft
Superheater area624.3 sq ft
Total heating area2,551 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
Von Borries compound
last changed: 01/2022
Bosnian-Herzegovinian Railway class IVa5
Yugoslav Railway class 83 and Hungarian State Railways series 483
Bosnia Herzegovina | 1903 | 185 produced
MÁVAG

After several locomotives had been built in smaller numbers for the narrow-gauge lines in Austria-Hungary, the breakthrough as a standard locomotive was achieved with the IVa5. It was built as a tender locomotive with a 0-8-2 wheel arrangement, initially with a compound engine and later as a superheated simple engine. They are technically related to the Mh/Mv of the NÖLB. Some were built for the meter gauge for use in Hungary.

83-159 of the Banovići coal railway in June 2016 in Oskova
83-159 of the Banovići coal railway in June 2016 in Oskova
Friedrich Böhringer

Even after the end of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, production continued for the railways of the SHS state and Yugoslavia. A total of 185 had been built by 1949, of which 169 were still in use in 1965. Even today, some are still in use on museum railways, including the Austrian Club 760. Two are used on the Banovići coal railway today, as they are more powerful in shunting than the existing diesel locomotives.

Variantcompoundsuperheated
General
Built1903-1949
ManufacturerKrauss Linz, MÁVAG, Jung, Đuro Đaković
Axle config0-8-2 (River Irt) 
Gauge2 ft 5 15/16 in (Bosnian gauge), 3 ft 3 3/8 in (Meter gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length44 ft 11 3/8 in
Service weight80,689 lbs83,776 lbs
Adhesive weight70,548 lbs71,650 lbs
Total weight114,640 lbs119,049 lbs
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power503 hp (375 kW)
Optimal speed27 mph15 mph
Top speed22 mph
Starting effort11,704 lbf21,194 lbf
with start valve14,045 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter35.4 in
Boiler pressure188 psi174 psi
Expansion typecompoundsimple
Cylinderstwo, HP: 14 9/16 x 17 11/16 in
and LP: 21 5/8 x 17 11/16 in
two, 16 15/16 x 17 11/16 in
Boiler
Grate area18.8 sq ft18.3 sq ft
Firebox area68.9 sq ft
Tube heating area1,130.2 sq ft880.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,199.1 sq ft949.4 sq ft
Superheater area267.8 sq ft
Total heating area1,199.1 sq ft1,217.2 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
passenger
narrow gauge
last changed: 08/2023
Boston & Maine classes K-5a and K-5b
United States | 1901 | 34 produced
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, January 1901

Parallel to the K-6 with a two-cylinder compound engine, the Boston & Maine had ALCO in Schenectady build 34 class K-5a and b locomotives with a simple engine. They still had the Stephenson controls but piston valves. According to “Railway and Locomotive Engineering”, the dimensions of the heating surfaces were very well matched to the size of the cylinders. The locomotives later designated as K-5d were actually K-7s with superheaters

General
Built1901
ManufacturerALCO
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase25 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase17 ft
Total wheelbase53 ft 10 ft
Service weight162,000 lbs
Adhesive weight142,000 lbs
Axle load35,500 lbs
Water capacity5,000 us gal
Fuel capacity20,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,500 hp (1,119 kW)
Optimal speed29 mph
Starting effort33,443 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter61 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 20 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area46.5 sq ft
Firebox area157 sq ft
Tube heating area2,718 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,875 sq ft
Total heating area2,875 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 03/2023
Canadian Pacific classes N3a, b, c and N2a, b, c
Canada | 1909 | 199 produced
No. 3716 in July 1986 in North Vancouver, British Columbia
No. 3716 in July 1986 in North Vancouver, British Columbia
Gary Everhart / www.rrpicturearchives.net

In 1909 H.H. Vaughan would produce a Consolidation that should achieve more power with 24x32 inch cylinders, but thanks to 63 inch (1,600 mm) large driving wheels should have enough steam even at higher speeds. However, during the trial runs it became apparent that the boiler was still insufficient at higher speeds. This resulted in the production engines with a cylinder diameter of just 23.5 inches.

In the years 1909 to 1911 the production engines of the class N3a were built, in 1912 more of the class N3b and in 1913 finally the class N3c. Technically, the subclasses were almost identical, but they differed in the driver's cab. The N3b and N3c used all-weather driver's cabs, which were characterized by an additional vestibule.

Since the capacity of the boiler later still proved to be too low compared to the cylinders, the conversion to class N2a to c took place in the 1920s. The diameter of the cylinders was reduced to 23 inches and the area of the firebox increased at the expense of the tube heating area. A larger superheater was also used.

There were two different versions of the N2, which had different boilers with 141 and 165 tubes respectively. 40 locomotives were converted to oil firing by 1950. As early as 1946, 65 units were converted to the P1n class with the 2-8-2 wheel arrangement. Four remain today, of which 3512 has been lying at the bottom of Slocan Lake in British Columbia since 1947 after a barge carrying the locomotive capsized.

VariantN3N2
General
Built1909-19131923-1926
ManufacturerCanadian Pacific, Montreal Locomotive Works, Canada FoundryMontreal Locomotive Works
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length75 ft 5 1/2 in
Wheelbase25 ft 5 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase55 ft 11 1/2 in55 ft 8 in
Service weight220,000 lbs240,000 lbs
Adhesive weight195,000 lbs216,000 lbs
Total weight354,000 lbs379,000 lbs
Water capacity6,000 us gal
Fuel capacity22,000 lbs (coal)24,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,700 hp (1,268 kW)1,800 hp (1,342 kW)
Optimal speed25 mph26 mph
Starting effort42,918 lbf43,395 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure180 psi190 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 23 1/2 x 32 intwo, 23 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area49.5 sq ft
Firebox area165 sq ft191 sq ft
Tube heating area2,400 sq ft2,125 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,565 sq ft2,316 sq ft
Superheater area436 sq ft602 sq ft
Total heating area3,001 sq ft2,918 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 01/2023
Central RR of New Jersey classes I-5 and I-6s
United States | 1903 | 10 produced
Locomotive Magazine, July 1907

The ten class I-5 Consolidations were delivered by ALCO-Brooks in 1903. For burning anthracite culm they were given a Wootten firebox with an 82 square foot grate and Camelback design. In the 1920s, all were superheated, with one locomotive keeping the cylinder diameter of 20 inches and the remaining getting 21 inch diameter cylinders. The former were designated I-5s while the rest became I-6s. The tender capacity was increased by a ton by installing boards. The last four members of the class remained in service until 1947.

VariantI-5rebuilt I-6s
General
Built1903
ManufacturerALCO
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight208,000 lbs216,500 lbs
Adhesive weight186,000 lbs194,500 lbs
Total weight350,000 lbs358,300 lbs
Axle load46,500 lbs48,625 lbs
Water capacity7,000 us gal
Fuel capacity26,000 lbs (coal)28,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Starting effort39,564 lbf43,619 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter55 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 20 x 32 intwo, 21 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area82 sq ft
Firebox area200 sq ft194.4 sq ft
Tube heating area2,972 sq ft2,011.6 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,172 sq ft2,206 sq ft
Superheater area474 sq ft
Total heating area3,172 sq ft2,680 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
camelback
last changed: 08/2023
Delaware & Hudson class U-II
later class E-1a
United States | 1898 | 10 produced
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, January 1899

The locomotives later grouped together in the class E-1 were a total of ten Camelback consolidations that the Delaware & Hudson procured in 1898 and 1899 for burning loose anthracite coal. Three were created by rebuilding a 4-4-0 and two 2-6-0. Seven others were newly built by Dickson and initially designated class U-II before becoming class E-1a.

The Wootten firebox already created a grate area of 80.3 square feet. In addition to the direct radiant area of 170 square feet, it contained a further 104 square feet in so-called “water bars”. One example of the class was built as a compound locomotive with comparatively large cylinders with a diameter of 23 and 34 inches. It was later simpled and scrapped along with its E-1 and E-1a class sisters between 1927 and 1928.

General
Built1898
ManufacturerDickson
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase23 ft 2 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 4 in
Total wheelbase51 ft
Service weight150,100 lbs
Adhesive weight134,500 lbs
Total weight234,600 lbs
Axle load33,625 lbs
Water capacity4,000 us gal
Fuel capacity14,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,500 hp (1,119 kW)
Optimal speed34 mph
Starting effort28,414 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter56 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 20 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area80.3 sq ft
Firebox area274 sq ft
Tube heating area1,712 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,986 sq ft
Total heating area1,986 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
camelback
last changed: 09/2022
Delaware & Hudson No 1400, 1401 and 1402
United States | 1924 | 3 produced
No. 1400 “Horatio Allen”
No. 1400 “Horatio Allen”
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, January 1925

Between 1924 and 1930, the Delaware & Hudson had three high-pressure locomotives with a 2-8-0 wheel arrangement built by ALCO-Schenectady. What they all had in common was the Mühlfeld boiler, which had a large water tube firebox. At the front there were two large drums that lay on top of the boiler barrel. All three locomotives were two-cylinder compounds with a two-axle booster on the tender.

The first was number 1400 named “Horatio Allen”, built in 1924. It had a boiler pressure of 350 psi (24.1 bars). In 1927, No. 1401 “John B. Jervis” was built, which had a boiler pressure of 400 psi (27.6 bars) and smaller cylinders. The boiler was later fully enclosed. In 1930 the No. 1402 “James Archibald” finally followed with a significantly increased boiler pressure of 500 psi (34.5 bar). Its boiler was also fully enclosed.

Since the significantly more complicated maintenance was not worth it in any way compared to the gain in efficiency, all of them were retired by 1935. In 1933, the D&H had No. 1402 “L.F. Loree” built as its fourth high-pressure locomotive with a 4-8-0 wheel arrangement, which suffered the same fate.

Variant140014011402
General
Built192419271930
ManufacturerALCO
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase29 ft
Fixed wheelbase18 ft
Service weight347,228 lbs337,307 lbs354,944 lbs
Adhesive weight297,624 lbs295,860 lbs299,828 lbs
Total weight545,864 lbs641,544 lbs630,521 lbs
Axle load74,406 lbs73,965 lbs74,957 lbs
Water capacity9,000 us gal16,000 us gal14,000 us gal
Fuel capacity33,000 lbs (coal)43,000 lbs (coal)35,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power3,560 hp (2,655 kW)3,440 hp (2,565 kW)
Estimated power4,500 hp (3,356 kW)
Optimal speed35 mph33 mph40 mph
Starting effort65,088 lbf66,311 lbf71,470 lbf
with start valve78,106 lbf79,573 lbf85,764 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter57 in63 in
Boiler pressure350 psi400 psi500 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylinderstwo, HP: 23 1/2 x 30 in
and LP: 41 x 30 in
two, HP: 22 1/4 x 30 in
and LP: 38 3/8 x 30 in
two, HP: 20 1/2 x 32 in
and LP: 39 1/2 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area71.5 sq ft82 sq ft
Firebox area1,188 sq ft1,213 sq ft1,122 sq ft
Tube heating area2,011 sq ft1,957 sq ft2,323 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,199 sq ft3,170 sq ft3,445 sq ft
Superheater area576 sq ft700 sq ft1,044 sq ft
Total heating area3,775 sq ft3,870 sq ft4,489 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
intermediate pressure
prototype
last changed: 03/2024
German Reichsbahn class 562-8
Germany | 1932 | 691 produced
rebuilt variant with coal dust tender
rebuilt variant with coal dust tender
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, April 1928

The class 562-8 was a conversion of the Prussian G 81, which had received a bissel axle in front of the coupled axles. On the one hand, this measure served to increase the permitted speed and also reduced the axle load to just over 16 tons. Although the G 81 was powerful, it could not achieve smooth running due to the missing carrying axle and the large overhangs. At the same time as the bissel axle was added, the boiler was moved slightly forward for better weight distribution and was also placed higher. In addition, ballast weights were attached to obtain additional traction due to the now very low axle load of the first two coupled axles

A total of 691 engines were rebuilt in this form. They could now run 70 km/h and were even used in the following decades to pull passenger trains in local traffic. Of the engines that were still in existence after the Second World War, smaller numbers were in Poland, Austria and the Soviet occupation zone of Germany, where they were also used everywhere. The Reichsbahn in the GDR was the last to use them until 1970.

However, most of the locomotives were in the three western zones after the war. A total of 410 engines were counted in varying conditions, of which the newly founded Federal Railways took over 368 pieces. They were phased out by 1968, with a new number being only provided for the last survivor, but no longer applied.

General
Built1932-1941
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length60 ft 0 5/16 in
Wheelbase23 ft 7 7/16 in
Fixed wheelbase15 ft 5 1/16 in
Empty weight151,898 lbs
Service weight164,465 lbs
Adhesive weight141,316 lbs
Total weight264,775 lbs
Axle load35,715 lbs
Water capacity4,359 us gal
Fuel capacity15,432 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power1,243 hp (927 kW)
Optimal speed17 mph
Top speed43 mph
Starting effort47,094 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter53.2 in
Boiler pressure203 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 23 5/8 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area28.6 sq ft
Firebox area149.5 sq ft
Tube heating area1,422.4 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,572 sq ft
Superheater area558.4 sq ft
Total heating area2,130.4 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
rebuilt
last changed: 01/2022
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