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Tank Locomotives 0-6-4T[Inhalt]
UIC Classification C2'
Barry Railway class L
Great Britain | 1914 | 10 produced
Locomotive Magazine, January 1915

During his time as chief designer at the Barry Railway, John Auld's only design was a tank locomotive intended for heavy coal transport. It was supposed to tow up to 60 coal wagons, each with a payload of twelve tons, from Trehafod to the coast. For this, the locomotive was provided with three coupled axles with the maximum possible axle load and was given a trailing bogie to be able to carry sufficiently large supplies. A Belpaire firebox was used and the smoke box was dimensioned with a view to the future, large enough to later accommodate a superheater

In the track systems of mines and ports, a design error quickly became apparent when navigating the narrow manual switches without a locking mechanism. If the locomotive drove into the branching points with the smoke box first, the wheel flanges of the third coupled axle could slip into the point's tongue and move it, causing the bogie to move in the direction pointing straight ahead. Not only could this lead to derailments, but it could also destroy the equalizing pipe between the water tanks, causing water loss and necessitating an emergency dropping of the fire. It also happened that one of the locomotives overturned. As a remedy, the fireman had to get out in such cases and hold the switch lever with all his strength.

Thus, the ten examples of the class in the originally intended role were quickly replaced by the older class B1 and now mainly used for mineral trains. They often hauled trains from Rhymney to New Tredegar on the Brecon and Merthyr Railway and was also found on Great Western lines. Occasionally they were even used as passenger locos on suburban trains to Cardiff. The possibility of installing a superheater in the existing boiler was never taken up, but three locomotives were given a new standard boiler with superheater by the GWR in 1923. Nevertheless, all ten examples were scrapped in 1926.

General
Built1914
ManufacturerHawthorn, Leslie & Co.
Axle config0-6-4T 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length loco15 ft 6 in
Wheelbase28 ft
Service weight167,440 lbs
Adhesive weight128,688 lbs
Axle load42,952 lbs
Water capacity2,642 us gal
Fuel capacity8,960 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power750 hp (559 kW)
Optimal speed19 mph
Starting effort24,754 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter55 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area22 sq ft
Firebox area123.5 sq ft
Tube heating area1,372 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,495.5 sq ft
Total heating area1,495.5 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
tank locomotive
freight
passenger
John Auld
last changed: 09/2022
Emperor Ferdinand Northern Railway series IX (191)
Imperial-Royal State Railways class 191
Austria-Hungary | 1888 | 2 produced
No. 907 “Alexanderfeld”
No. 907 “Alexanderfeld”
General
Built1888
ManufacturerWiener Neustadt
Axle config0-6-4T 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length33 ft 0 7/8 in
Wheelbase21 ft 3 7/8 in
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 10 5/16 in
Empty weight63,934 lbs
Adhesive weight52,029 lbs
Water capacity1,453 us gal
Fuel capacity3,307 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power335 hp (250 kW)
Optimal speed15 mph
Starting effort14,436 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter39.4 in
Boiler pressure174 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 14 9/16 x 18 1/8 in
Boiler
Grate area14.6 sq ft
Firebox area61.4 sq ft
Tube heating area697.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area758.9 sq ft
Total heating area758.9 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
passenger
tank locomotive
secondary line
last changed: 08 2023
Midland class 2000
London, Midland & Scottish class 3P
Great Britain | 1907 | 40 produced
flickr/stratfordman72

The Midland Railway's class 2000 was a heavy suburban tank locomotive designed in the tradition of the popular 0-4-4T wheel arrangement, but with an additional driving axle. The water tanks extended to the smokebox and, in conjunction with the shape of the side windows in the cab, led to the nickname “flatiron”. Another feature was the cutouts in the water tanks, which guaranteed accessibility to the inside motion.

The boiler was replaced between 1920 and 1926 with a new one with superheater and Belpaire firebox. In order to guarantee sufficient curve negotiation, the first driving axle was designed with lateral play. This was probably the cause for the oscillations at higher speeds, which led to several derailments. They were soon only used in freight service and were withdrawn between 1935 and 1938.

Variantas builtsuperheated
General
Built19071920-1926
ManufacturerDerby
Axle config0-6-4T 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length40 ft 4 5/8 in
Wheelbase28 ft
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 6 in
Service weight162,220 lbs171,471 lbs
Adhesive weight117,980 lbs124,431 lbs
Water capacity2,690 us gal
Fuel capacity7,840 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power750 hp (559 kW)950 hp (708 kW)
Optimal speed24 mph31 mph
Starting effort19,756 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter67 in
Boiler pressure175 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area21 sq ft
Firebox area125 sq ft123.5 sq ft
Tube heating area1,206.5 sq ft1,043.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,331.5 sq ft1,167 sq ft
Superheater area253 sq ft
Total heating area1,331.5 sq ft1,420 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
Richard Deeley
last changed: 03/2024
São Paulo Railway No. 1, 23 and 24
Brazil | 1884 | 3 produced
Locomotive Magazine, December 1903

In 1884, the São Paulo Railway received three tank locomotives from Nasmyth, Wilson & Co., which had a 0-6-4T wheel arrangement. Since the number 1 had already been scrapped, they were given the numbers 1, 23 and 24. It was unusual that these locomotives, in the style of the later “Cab Forward” locomotives, always ran with the coal bunker first to keep the smoke gases away from the crew. The drawing shows that the cowcatcher and the headlight were also mounted on this side.

General
Built1884
ManufacturerNasmyth, Wilson & Co.
Axle config0-6-4T 
Gauge5 ft 3 in (Irish broad gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length32 ft 7 in
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Starting effort14,696 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter49.8 in
Boiler pressure140 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 16 x 24 in
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
tank locomotive
cab forward
last changed: 07/2023
Sligo, Leitrim & Northern Counties Leitrim class
Ireland | 1882 | 5 produced
Locomotive Magazine, May 1903

The Sligo, Leitrim and Northern Counties Railway operated a 43-mile line in northern Ireland from 1877, which consisted only of the main line and had no branch lines. However, since this route, which was built in the Irish broad gauge of 5 ft 3 in, was only laid out with light rails, the running characteristics of the two 0-6-2T locomotives “Pioneer” and “Sligo” left a lot to be desired. The solution was to replace the trailng axle with a bogie

Model of the “Fermanagh”
Model of the “Fermanagh”
Bradley Wurth

The company Beyer, Peacock & Co. had delivered locomotives of this type to the South Australian Railways as class K from 1879, which were also designed for lightly built routes. So they ordered two locomotives with the names “Fermanagh” and “Leitrim”, which were basically an enlarged class K. Since these proved themselves, three more examples followed by 1899, named “Lurganboy”, “Lissadell” and “Hazelwood”. The first of these locomotives, now known as the Leitrim class, were not retired until 1947 and one remained in service until 1957, when the SL&NCR ceased operations.

General
Built1882-1899
ManufacturerBeyer, Peacock & Co.
Axle config0-6-4T 
Gauge5 ft 3 in (Irish broad gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase23 ft 3 in
Fixed wheelbase11 ft 0 1/2 in
Service weight96,208 lbs
Adhesive weight60,032 lbs
Water capacity1,729 us gal
Fuel capacity4,032 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power275 hp (205 kW)
Optimal speed16 mph
Starting effort10,744 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter56 in
Boiler pressure130 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 16 1/2 x 20 in
Boiler
Grate area14.9 sq ft
Firebox area75.8 sq ft
Tube heating area897.2 sq ft
Evaporative heating area973 sq ft
Total heating area973 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
tank locomotive
last changed: 02/2022
Sligo, Leitrim & Northern Counties Lough class
Ulster Transport Authority class Z
Northern Ireland | 1949 | 2 produced
“Lough Erne” stored in Whitehead
“Lough Erne” stored in Whitehead
Milepost88

After the five Leitrim class locomotives from the 19th century, SL&NCR had procured three more Sir Henry class locomotives in 1904, 1905 and 1917, which also had the 0-6-4T wheel arrangement and were manufactured by Beyer, Peacock & Co. After the Second World War, the existing fleet of vehicles was no longer sufficient and in poor condition, so that the procurement of a powerful Garratt locomotive was initially considered. The route was now between Ireland and Northern Ireland, which made operation not exactly easy. In addition, it was in a sparsely populated and not very prosperous area, which significantly worsened the financial situation and made it impossible to buy an expensive locomotive.

Finally, two smaller locomotives were ordered, which again had the 0-6-4T wheel arrangement and were completed in 1949. Since the SL&NCR could not pay for the locomotives, lengthy negotiations with the government of Northern Ireland followed. It was finally agreed on a lease purchase and the locomotives were used until the line was closed in 1957. They were named after the lakes Lough Melvin and Lough Erne, which explains the name of the class. They were then sold to the Ulster Transport Authority and used by them as Class Z for about ten years. Preserved by the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland, Lough Erne is now at Whitehead on the Northern Irish coast.

General
Built1949
ManufacturerBeyer, Peacock & Co.
Axle config0-6-4T 
Gauge5 ft 3 in (Irish broad gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase23 ft 3 in
Fixed wheelbase11 ft 0 1/2 in
Service weight117,600 lbs
Adhesive weight82,880 lbs
Water capacity1,561 us gal
Fuel capacity4,480 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power500 hp (373 kW)
Optimal speed17 mph
Starting effort18,885 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter56 in
Boiler pressure160 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area18 sq ft
Firebox area98.5 sq ft
Tube heating area1,050 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,148.5 sq ft
Total heating area1,148.5 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
tank locomotive
last changed: 02/2022
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