loco-info.com
The reference for locomotives and railcars
Navigation
Random
Search
Compare
Settings
Tank Locomotives 2-6-4T “Adriatic”[Inhalt]
UIC Classification 1'C2'
British Rail standard class 4 tank
Great Britain | 1951 | 155 produced
No. 80072 in March 2013 at Kidderminster
No. 80072 in March 2013 at Kidderminster
Tony Hisgett

The standard class 4 tank locomotive was developed to replace older tank locomotives for use with fast commuter and suburban trains. It was based on the LMS Fairburn 2-6-4T and had a similar driving wheel diameter of five feet eight inches. For a wider range of uses, the loading gauge was reduced by slightly rounding off the driver's cab and the water tanks. The smaller cylinders, which were compensated for with a higher boiler pressure, also contributed to this.

Most of the locomotives were made in Brighton, where a total of 130 were built. Another 15 were from Derby and ten from Doncaster. Another order for 15 locomotives was canceled in view of the dieselisation. The fact that only small detail changes were made to the locomotives during the period of operation shows that the design itself was successful. It also served as the basis for the standard class 4 4-6-0 tender locomotive

The locomotives were used almost all over the country. Only in the Western Region was the GWR's Large Prairie available in sufficient numbers to be able to dispense with the 2-6-4T. The first machine was scrapped in 1962 after it suffered a broken frame. Since older classes were phased out first, the 2-6-4T was only phased out between 1964 and 1967. A total of 15 have survived to this day, some of which are used regularly.

General
Built1951-1956
ManufacturerBrighton, Derby, Doncaster
Axle config2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length44 ft 10 in
Wheelbase36 ft 10 in
Fixed wheelbase15 ft 4 in
Service weight198,420 lbs
Adhesive weight118,720 lbs
Axle load40,208 lbs
Water capacity2,402 us gal
Fuel capacity7,280 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,450 hp (1,081 kW)
Optimal speed36 mph
Top speed75 mph
Starting effort25,515 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter68 in
Boiler pressure225 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area26.7 sq ft
Firebox area143 sq ft
Tube heating area1,223 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,366 sq ft
Superheater area240 sq ft
Total heating area1,606 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
Robert Arthur Riddles
last changed: 01/2022
Danish State Railways SII
Denmark | 1924 | 20 produced
Borsig
General
Built1924, 1927-1928
ManufacturerBorsig, Frichs
Axle config2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length48 ft 9 1/16 in
Wheelbase37 ft 6 13/16 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 3 7/16 in
Empty weight171,299 lbs
Service weight217,376 lbs
Adhesive weight112,215 lbs
Axle load37,479 lbs
Water capacity2,642 us gal
Fuel capacity6,614 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power939 hp (700 kW)
Optimal speed24 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort24,624 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter68.1 in
Boiler pressure174 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylindersthree, 16 15/16 x 26 3/8 in
Boiler
Grate area25.8 sq ft
Firebox area138.9 sq ft
Tube heating area1,272.3 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,411.1 sq ft
Superheater area495.1 sq ft
Total heating area1,906.3 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 03 2024
German Federal Railway class 66
Germany | 1955 | 3 produced
66 002 in September 1982 in Bochum-Dahlhausen
66 002 in September 1982 in Bochum-Dahlhausen
MPW57

The class 66 tank locomotive was developed as one of the last new-build steam locomotives on the Bundesbahn, of which only two were built in 1955. In its basic design, it corresponded to the class 65, but was smaller and had one less coupled axle. In addition, it had a lower axle load for use on secondary lines and at the same time a larger coupling wheel diameter in order to still be able to reach 100 km/h. On the one hand, it was intended to replace old passenger locomotives such as the Prussian P 8 and T 18, but also freight locomotives such as the T 14. With a combustion chamber boiler, roller bearings and a direct-contact feed water heater, they corresponded to the current state of development. In addition, welding technology was consistently used in their production and the comfort of the crew was also taken into account when setting up the driver's cab.

Since the first mainline diesel locomotives suitable for operation on branch lines were ready for use at this time, no further units of the class 66 were built. The two existing engines were soon equipped with push-pull train controls and were mainly used for passenger transport. A third, almost identical locomotive was delivered to the Mülheim Ruhr Valley Railway in 1959. The Bundesbahn later took it over as road number 66 6006. The two examples originally built for the Bundesbahn were retired in 1967 and 1968 and today road number 66 002 can be viewed in the Bochum-Dahlhausen Railway Museum. In a contribution by Ulrich Budde in the forum “Drehscheibe Online” it is credibly described that the latter is actually 66 6006, which was subsequently given the other number.

General
Built1955
ManufacturerHenschel
Axle config2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length48 ft 4 11/16 in
Wheelbase36 ft 3 1/16 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 1 11/16 in
Empty weight153,882 lbs
Service weight207,014 lbs
Adhesive weight103,838 lbs
Axle load34,833 lbs
Water capacity3,698 us gal
Fuel capacity11,023 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power1,155 hp (861 kW)
Optimal speed26 mph
Top speed62 mph
Starting effort27,864 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure232 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area21.1 sq ft
Firebox area122.7 sq ft
Tube heating area818.8 sq ft
Evaporative heating area941.5 sq ft
Superheater area485.8 sq ft
Total heating area1,427.3 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
tank locomotive
last changed: 01/2022
Great Central class 1B
London & North Eastern classes L1 and L3
Great Britain | 1914 | 20 produced
flickr/Historical Railway Images

In the 1910s the Great Central Railway needed new tank locomotives to serve coal traffic between the mining areas of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire and the port at Immingham. Due to the good experiences with the class D of the Lancashire, Derbyshire and East Coast Railway, which had the wheel arrangement 0-6-4T, this was used as a basis.

It received a larger superheated boiler similar to that of the 4-4-0 class 11E. In order to be able to carry this, a leading axle was added. The result was the class 1B, which was the first standard gauge British 2-6-4T tank locomotive. With a coal capacity of 4.5 tons and 3,000 gallons of water, the supplies were not much smaller than most British tender locomotives

In everyday life it turned out that the frame was severely stressed by the position of the inside cylinders. In addition, the braking power was hardly sufficient for use with coal trains in the intended area. Since coal traffic there was ultimately declining, they were used in coal traffic in flatter areas. At the LNER they were first called class L1 and renamed L3 in 1945 due to another locomotive. 19 of the 20 came to British Railways and were withdrawn by 1955.

General
Built1914-1917
ManufacturerGorton
Axle config2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length46 ft 4 3/4 in
Wheelbase37 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase17 ft
Service weight215,936 lbs
Adhesive weight131,600 lbs
Axle load44,800 lbs
Water capacity3,603 us gal
Fuel capacity10,080 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,100 hp (820 kW)
Optimal speed24 mph
Starting effort28,759 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter61 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 21 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area26.5 sq ft
Firebox area157 sq ft
Tube heating area1,386.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,543.5 sq ft
Superheater area209 sq ft
Total heating area1,752.5 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
tank locomotive
John George Robinson
last changed: 03/2024
London, Midland & Scottish Fowler 4P 2-6-4T
Great Britain | 1927 | 125 produced
British Railways No. 42368 in April 1960 at Derby Depot
British Railways No. 42368 in April 1960 at Derby Depot
Ben Brooksbank / LMS Fowler 2-6-4T at Derby Locomotive Depot
General
Built1927-1934
ManufacturerDerby
Axle config2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length47 ft 2 3/4 in
Wheelbase38 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 6 in
Service weight193,200 lbs
Adhesive weight120,152 lbs
Axle load40,345 lbs
Water capacity2,402 us gal
Fuel capacity7,840 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,225 hp (913 kW)
Optimal speed34 mph
Starting effort23,125 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 19 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area25 sq ft
Firebox area138 sq ft
Tube heating area1,082 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,220 sq ft
Superheater area266 sq ft
Total heating area1,486 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 09 2023
London, Midland & Scottish Fairburn 4P 2-6-4T
Great Britain | 1945 | 277 produced
British Railways No. 42183 in May 1962
British Railways No. 42183 in May 1962
Ben Brooksbank / Special Cup Final local shuttle train from Euston arriving at Wembley Central
General
Built1945-1951
ManufacturerDerby, Brighton
Axle config2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length45 ft 9 5/8 in
Wheelbase37 ft 1 in
Fixed wheelbase15 ft 4 in
Service weight190,960 lbs
Adhesive weight118,720 lbs
Axle load40,208 lbs
Water capacity2,402 us gal
Fuel capacity7,840 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,300 hp (969 kW)
Optimal speed37 mph
Starting effort22,351 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area26.7 sq ft
Firebox area143 sq ft
Tube heating area1,223 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,366 sq ft
Superheater area240 sq ft
Total heating area1,606 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 08 2023
New Zealand Railways class WF
New Zealand | 1904 | 41 produced
No. 842 around 1928
No. 842 around 1928
Albert Percy Godber / Godber Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library
General
Built1904-1908, 1928
ManufacturerAddington, Hillside
Axle config2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge3 ft 6 in (Cape gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length34 ft 2 in
Wheelbase27 ft
Fixed wheelbase10 ft
Service weight97,887 lbs
Adhesive weight60,257 lbs
Axle load20,086 lbs
Water capacity1,141 us gal
Fuel capacity4,928 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power500 hp (373 kW)
Optimal speed20 mph
Starting effort16,290 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter45 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 14 x 22 in
Boiler
Grate area15.4 sq ft
Evaporative heating area729 sq ft
Total heating area729 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
secondary line
last changed: 09 2023
Palatinate Railways P 5 and Bavarian Pt 3/6
German Reichsbahn class 770-1
Germany | 1908 | 41 produced
Die Lokomotive, June 1921

When a powerful passenger train locomotive was needed for the Palatinate network, the main lines with many stops and turning points were considered, and so the decision was made in favor of a large tank locomotive. The locomotive developed as the Palatinate P 5 only achieved its greatest number of units after it was taken over by the Bavarian State Railways and is therefore primarily known under its Bavarian designation Pt 3/6.

The P 5 was the first 2-6-4 tank locomotive on the European mainland. The rear bogie was primarily used to carry the weight of the supplies and had the effect that as the amount of coal decreased, there was still almost the same weight on the coupled axles. The reserves in the first variant included 16 cubic meters of water and 5.2 tons of coal, which was more than in older, three-axle tenders. The three coupled axles were used to be able to carry a heavy boiler and have a high tractive power available.

Due to this arrangement, it had become necessary to bring the leading axle as close as possible to the first coupled axle. Therefore, an extremely unusual arrangement of the Krauss-Helmholtz bogie was used, in which the leading axle was connected to the second coupled axle instead of the first. In addition, the cylinders were arranged relatively high and inclined, since there was no longer enough space in the usual position.

The first production lot included twelve engines, which had been delivered in 1908 as the P 5 with saturated steam. After the takeover, the state railway procured another 29 units between 1911 and 1923, which were already running on superheated steam. The remaining engine were finally also equipped with a superheater in 1925. In comparison, the maximum train load of the saturated engines at two percent and 30 km/h was 140 tonnes, while this could be increased to 180 tonnes with superheater

At the Reichsbahn, the older engines were given the numbers 77 001 to 77 012, while the newer ones became 77 101 to 77 129. The engines procured for Bavaria continued to be used on the express route between Garmisch-Partenkirchen and Munich, since these had similar characteristics to the routes for which the P 5 had originally been developed. Almost all of the locomotives of the newer series survived the Second World War, with only one eventually going to the Reichsbahn and the rest to the Bundesbahn, where they were used until 1956 and 1954 respectively. The nine remaining examples of the first series were sold to various private railways immediately after the war.

VariantP 5Pt 3/6
General
Built19081911-1923
ManufacturerKrauss
Axle config2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length43 ft 1 5/16 in44 ft 1 15/16 in
Wheelbase30 ft 10 1/16 in30 ft 0 1/4 in
Fixed wheelbase11 ft 9 3/4 in
Empty weight141,096 lbs
Service weight204,809 lbs208,998 lbs
Adhesive weight110,231 lbs107,585 lbs
Axle load36,817 lbs35,935 lbs
Water capacity4,227 us gal3,698 us gal
Fuel capacity11,464 lbs (coal)9,921 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power849 hp (633 kW)
Estimated power1,006 hp (750 kW)
Optimal speed21 mph25 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort26,044 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter59.1 in
Boiler pressure188 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 20 7/8 x 22 1/16 in
Boiler
Grate area25.2 sq ft
Firebox area107 sq ft111.1 sq ft
Tube heating area1,497.3 sq ft1,083.1 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,604.3 sq ft1,194.1 sq ft
Superheater area376.7 sq ft
Total heating area1,604.3 sq ft1,570.9 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 01/2022
Ferrovie Nord Milano class 290
Italy | 1931 | 4 produced
Die Lokomotive, February 1933

Although the FNM also operated an electrified suburban network around Milan, steam locomotives were needed for the more distant destinations. A tender locomotive was commissioned to speed up traffic, which should combine good acceleration with a maximum speed of 100 km/h. The order went to CEMSA, whose works in Saronno were located along the route of the FNM.

The four locomotives were apparently based on plans that came from Borsig. The 2-6-4T wheel arrangement was typical of modern passenger tank locomotives and combined good running characteristics with a large firebox and large supplies. The boiler delivered 1,060 hp permanently and 1,200 hp for short periods. The three cylinders, together with the 1,620 mm large coupled wheels, ensured good acceleration.

The locomotives were used to run direct connections from Milan to Como, Varese, Laveno, Erba and Asso. For some other routes, the axle load of 16.5 tonnes was too high. After the main routes had been electrified, these locomotives could not be used on the secondary routes. So they were retired in 1952 and scrapped shortly thereafter.

General
Built1931
ManufacturerCEMSA
Axle config2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length48 ft 0 3/4 in
Wheelbase36 ft 7 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 9 9/16 in
Empty weight169,756 lbs
Service weight211,644 lbs
Adhesive weight109,129 lbs
Axle load36,376 lbs
Water capacity2,378 us gal
Fuel capacity5,512 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power1,046 hp (780 kW)
Optimal speed18 mph
Top speed62 mph
Starting effort37,843 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63.8 in
Boiler pressure232 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylindersthree, 17 11/16 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area33.4 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,603.8 sq ft
Superheater area559.7 sq ft
Total heating area2,163.5 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
express
tank locomotive
last changed: 03/2023
loading...

We use cookies to save the following settings:

  • selected navigation structure
  • selected language
  • preferred units
  • spelling of railway company names

If you refuse the use of cookies, the settings will only be retained for the current session and will be reset to the default values the next time you visit the site.

Display of units

Here you can set the desired unit system for the technical data.

  • Metric: Lengths in meters, weights in tonnes, and volumes in cubic meters
  • Imperial (UK): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in long tons and volumes in imperial gallons
  • Imperial (US): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in pounds, and volumes in US gallons
  • Individual: Depends on the country of origin of each locomotive
Operator names

Here you can set the display of railway company names.

  • Short: Abbreviation or short form of the name
  • Standard: commonly used name, partially translated to English
  • Complete: full name in local language