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Tank Locomotives 2-6-2T “Prairie”[Inhalt]
UIC Classification 1'C1'
Badenian VI b
German Reichsbahn class 751-3
Germany | 1900 | 131 produced
No. 279 on a works photo
No. 279 on a works photo

Around 1900, the operation on the Höllentalbahn in the Black Forest was handled with rack locomotives, as this included gradients of up to 5.5 percent. With increasing traffic on this main line, however, this operation was no longer reasonable, which is why an alternative with shorter travel times was sought. The solution was a powerful tank locomotive that was to run the entire route. Only on the steepest section it was intended that the train should be pushed by a rack locomotive. The development was the first tank locomotive with a 2-6-2T wheel arrangement in Germany, with which one had expected not only a high tractive effort but also identical running characteristics in both directions of travel.

In order to achieve a symmetrical construction of the chassis, both carrying axles were designed as Adams axles and all three coupled axles were fixed in the frame. Only the middle coupled axle was given weakened wheel flanges. This axle was driven via short connecting rods. A distinctive feature of the locomotives were the two steam domes on the front section of the boiler barrel, which were connected via a compensating pipe. The locomotives of all batches used saturated steam. Despite the lower weight compared to the later VI c, an output of around 540 hp was achieved.

Production comprised a total of eleven batches, the first nine of which were built between 1900 and 1908 by Maffei and the Karlsruhe mechanical engineering company. This made 131 copies, nine of which had to be handed over to Alsace-Lorraine and Belgium as reparations after the war. The rest were taken over by the Reichsbahn and given the numbers between 75 101 and 75 258, including some gaps.

In the years 1921 and 1923 another 42 pieces were procured by the Reichsbahn as 75 261 to 75 302. There had always been deviations between the individual batches, which mainly affected the weight and dimensions. Some locomotives had been given an inclined firebox and/or a counter-pressure brake for steep stretches. In addition, the coal supply was increased by an extension from initially two to three tonnes. The decommissioning of some of the locomotives had already begun in 1933. Since most of the remaining vehicles remained in their original area, after the Second World War the vast majority of them, 117 units, came to the Bundesbahn, where most were retired by 1957, but a few were not retired until 1962. Only seven units remained in the east with the Reichsbahn, some of which were used until 1965.

Variantbatches 1-5batches 6-7batches 8-9batches 10-11
General
Built1900-19031904, 19061907-19081921, 1923
ManufacturerMaffei, MBG KarlsruheMBG Karlsruhe
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length38 ft 7 1/8 in
Wheelbase27 ft 6 11/16 in
Fixed wheelbase5 ft 6 15/16 in
Empty weight114,861 lbs113,758 lbs111,995 lbs114,199 lbs
Service weight143,962 lbs141,537 lbs141,757 lbs148,371 lbs
Adhesive weight93,035 lbs93,255 lbs
Axle load31,085 lbs
Water capacity1,849 us gal
Fuel capacity6,614 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power532 hp (397 kW)
Optimal speed17 mph
Top speed50 mph
Starting effort20,004 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter58.3 in
Boiler pressure188 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 1/8 x 24 13/16 in
Boiler
Grate area19.7 sq ft
Firebox area86.1 sq ft88.8 sq ft93.6 sq ft
Tube heating area1,164.8 sq ft1,140.1 sq ft1,164.8 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,250.9 sq ft1,226.2 sq ft1,228.9 sq ft1,258.4 sq ft
Total heating area1,250.9 sq ft1,226.2 sq ft1,228.9 sq ft1,258.4 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 01/2022
Badenian VI c
German Reichsbahn classes 754 and 7510-11
Germany | 1914 | 135 produced
75 1118, the last VI c to be retired in July 1990 in Stubersheim
75 1118, the last VI c to be retired in July 1990 in Stubersheim
Werner & Hansjörg Brutzer

The VI c was developed to supplement the tank locomotives of class VI b, which should be considerably more powerful despite a similar appearance. This was achieved primarily through the use of superheated steam and the larger axle loads that were now possible. With the new locomotives, it should be possible to transport trains weighing 350 tonnes at 80 km/h on the level and to reach 35 km/h with 200 tonnes on the steeper sections of the Black Forest Railway at 1.7 percent. As a result, locomotives were developed that, with their reinforced construction and larger reserves, had a service weight that was around ten tonnes higher than that of the VI b.

As with the predecessor, both carring axles were designed as Adams axles, but the coupled wheels were enlarged from 1,480 to 1,600 mm, which now allowed a maximum speed of 90 km/h. The continuous plate frame had blanks at both ends to accommodate the Adams axes and also accommodated a water tank, which also served as to stiffen it up. According to the larger wheels, the position of the boiler was shifted upwards, and the new locomotives now only had a single steam dome. Due to the significantly larger boiler, it was possible to reduce the steam pressure from 13 to 12 bar and still achieve a significant increase in output.

Die Lokomotive, August 1918

Between 1914 and 1921, 135 pieces were made in a total of nine series, most of which came from Karlsruhe and some from Jung. There were differences in production between the series. First a feedwater heater was introduced, later a firebox made of steel instead of copper and finally a reinforced frame for the last two series. Due to the large number, the engines later made up a good half of all locomotives in Baden. After the First World War, 28 of them had to be handed in as reparations, and some of the others were also used on the S-Bahn in the years that followed. At the Reichsbahn all remaining engines became the classes 754 and 7510-11, with the former designating the lighter and the latter the heavier variants. After the Second World War, the Bundesbahn took over 66 units and used them until 1969.

Variant1914 variant1920 variant
General
Built1914-19191920-1921
ManufacturerMBG Karlsruhe, Jung
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length41 ft 8 in
Wheelbase29 ft 2 3/8 in
Empty weight127,537 lbs135,143 lbs
Service weight171,850 lbs175,267 lbs
Adhesive weight109,459 lbs111,554 lbs
Axle load36,927 lbs37,038 lbs
Water capacity2,642 us gal
Fuel capacity8,818 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power778 hp (580 kW)
Optimal speed19 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort26,740 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure174 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 21 1/4 x 25 3/16 in
Boiler
Grate area22.2 sq ft
Firebox area107.2 sq ft
Tube heating area1,034.9 sq ft1,007.1 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,142.2 sq ft1,114.3 sq ft
Superheater area438.6 sq ft
Total heating area1,580.8 sq ft1,552.9 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 01/2022
British Rail Standard class 2 tank
Great Britain | 1953 | 30 produced
flickr/Historical Railway Images

The smallest tank locomotive of the BR standard program was the class 2 tank with a 2-6-2T wheel arrangement. It was derived from the LMS Ivatt class 2 2-6-2T and intended for mixed traffic. It had a smaller loading gauge than its LMS prototype and had a number of standard fittings. A very similar standard locomotive was the class 2 2-6-0.

Since there were already 130 Ivatt 2-6-2T, BR only ordered 30 of the standard type. The first 20 were built in Crewe and used in former LMS area. The other ten were built in Darlington and used in the Southern region. After they also came to other regions, their service life ended between 1963 and 1966. Since none were preserved, the Bluebell Railway is now rebuilding 2-6-0 No. 78059 into 2-6-2T No. 84030.

General
Built1953-1957
ManufacturerCrewe, Darlington
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length38 ft 9 3/8 in
Wheelbase30 ft 3 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 9 in
Service weight148,400 lbs
Adhesive weight92,400 lbs
Axle load31,360 lbs
Water capacity6,720 us gal
Fuel capacity1,621 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power850 hp (634 kW)
Optimal speed29 mph
Starting effort18,513 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter60 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 16 1/2 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area17.5 sq ft
Firebox area101 sq ft
Tube heating area924 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,025 sq ft
Superheater area124 sq ft
Total heating area1,149 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
passenger
tank locomotive
Robert Arthur Riddles
last changed: 05/2024
British Rail Standard class 3 tank
Great Britain | 1952 | 45 produced
No. 82009 in July 1958 in Crewe
No. 82009 in July 1958 in Crewe
Ben Brooksbank / Crewe Station, south end, with BR Standard 2-6-2T

For power class 3, first a tank locomotive with a 2-6-2 wheel arrangement was developed. Its running gear was based on that of the Ivatt class 4 tender locomotive of the LMS, and other parts also came from this. However, the boiler was based on the GWR's standard No. 2 boiler used on the class “Large Prairie” 5101 and the class 5600. Shortly after the last locomotives were put into service, diesel multiple units were delivered, which contested part of their service area. Nevertheless, the first withdrawals did not take place until 1964 and the last ones were completed in 1967.

General
Built1952-1955
ManufacturerSwindon
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length40 ft 10 1/2 in
Wheelbase32 ft 7 in
Fixed wheelbase15 ft 2 in
Service weight168,000 lbs
Adhesive weight110,880 lbs
Axle load361,960 lbs
Water capacity1,801 us gal
Fuel capacity6,720 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power925 hp (690 kW)
Optimal speed27 mph
Starting effort21,486 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area20.4 sq ft
Firebox area118.4 sq ft
Tube heating area923.6 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,042 sq ft
Superheater area185 sq ft
Total heating area1,227 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
tank locomotive
Robert Arthur Riddles
last changed: 04/2023
Chōsen Government Railway Pureha class
Korean National Pureo8 class and North Korean State Railway Purŏp'a class
Korea | 1932 | 38 produced
Pureha No. 36 on a factory photo
Pureha No. 36 on a factory photo
Kisha Seizo Kaisha
General
Built1932, 1939
ManufacturerGyeongseong, Hitachi, Kisha Seizō
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length35 ft 10 1/4 in
Service weight149,253 lbs
Adhesive weight96,783 lbs
Water capacity1,321 us gal
Fuel capacity4,409 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,006 hp (750 kW)
Optimal speed36 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort18,052 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter59.8 in
Boiler pressure203 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 16 1/8 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area25.8 sq ft
Firebox area109.8 sq ft
Tube heating area749.2 sq ft
Evaporative heating area859 sq ft
Superheater area263.7 sq ft
Total heating area1,122.7 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
switcher
tank locomotive
last changed: 09 2023
German Reichsbahn class 64
Polish State Railways OKl2 and Czechoslovak State Railways class 365.4
Germany | 1928 | 520 produced
64 491 of the Dampfbahn Fränkische Schweiz in May 2023 in Ebermannstadt
64 491 of the Dampfbahn Fränkische Schweiz in May 2023 in Ebermannstadt
Kay Friebertshäuser

In 1925, when the standard locomotive program was still young, a passenger locomotive for branch lines with an axle load of 15 tonnes was to be developed. With a maximum speed of 90 km/h, this should also be able to be used in front of light trains on main lines. Above all, this locomotive was intended to replace a large number of different Länderbahn locomotives that had now reached an advanced age. Since there was no consent as to whether a tender locomotive or a tank locomotive should be developed, the class 24 was created as a tender locomotive and the class 64 as a tank locomotive

Both classes were identical in terms of chassis with the leading and the three coupled axles and also had the same boiler. The 64 also had a trailing axle that carried the coal supplies and part of the water supplies. As a result, the 64 could also run backwards at 90 km/h, which was not possible with the 24 with the tender. Both carrying axles were only stored in Bissel frames on almost all machines, only the last ten had a Krauss-Helmholtz bogie installed at the front.

In 1928 alone, 188 were made by a large number of manufacturers and by 1940 the number had risen to 520. Another order for 90 units was canceled in favor of the more urgently needed freight locomotives. A locomotive built in 1940 was delivered directly to the Elmshorn-Barmstedt-Oldesloer Eisenbahn (EBOE).

Schematic drawing with dimensions
Schematic drawing with dimensions
DEWAG Halle

After the Second World War, 393 units were still available in Germany. Of these, 278 went to the Bundesbahn and 115 to the Reichsbahn. 37 were in Poland and thus went to the PKP as OKl2. These three railway companies retired them in the mid-1970s. Individual machines could be found in Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union and Austria, which continued to be used. Today there are still 19 left, three of which are operational.

Variant64 001-51064 511-520
General
Built1928-1940
ManufacturerAEG, Borsig, Esslingen, Hanomag, Henschel, Humboldt, Jung, Krauss-Maffei, Krupp, Linke-Hofmann, O&K, Schichau, Union Königsberg, Vulcan, Wolf
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length40 ft 8 3/16 in41 ft 0 1/8 in
Wheelbase29 ft 6 5/16 in
Fixed wheelbase11 ft 9 3/4 in5 ft 10 7/8 in
Empty weight127,868 lbs128,970 lbs
Service weight165,126 lbs165,787 lbs
Adhesive weight100,310 lbs
Axle load33,510 lbs
Water capacity2,378 us gal
Fuel capacity6,614 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power937 hp (699 kW)
Optimal speed20 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort29,434 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter59.1 in
Boiler pressure203 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 19 11/16 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area22 sq ft
Firebox area93.6 sq ft
Tube heating area1,031 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,124.6 sq ft
Superheater area401.9 sq ft
Total heating area1,526.5 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 02/2023
East Indian classes WV and WM
India | 1942 | 74 produced
WM No. 2210 on a works photo
WM No. 2210 on a works photo
Vulcan Foundry

In 1942, the East Indian Railway initially had four tank locomotives with a 2-6-2T wheel arrangement built for suburban services in Calcutta. These were supplied by the Vulcan Foundry in England and designated Class WV. A good compromise between speed and traction was found with a driving wheel diameter of 67 inches. They had a Belpaire firebox and compensating levers on the three coupled axles. However, it quickly turned out that the water and coal reserves were too small.

WV No. 2210 on a works photo
WV No. 2210 on a works photo
Vulcan Foundry

As a result, ten more locomotives were built in 1942, which had a bogie instead of the trailing axle, which meant that significantly larger supplies could be accommodated. With that, the WM class was born and the four WVs were also rebuilt into the WM. Only after the restructuring of the Indian Railways, each 30 more locomotives from Vulcan and Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns were built.

VariantWVWM
General
Built19421942, 1951-1954
ManufacturerVulcan FoundryVulcan Foundry, Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 2-6-4T (Adriatic) 
Gauge5 ft 6 in (Indian broad gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase32 ft 1 1/2 in36 ft 4 1/2 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Service weight181,440 lbs216,300 lbs
Adhesive weight108,640 lbs108,612 lbs
Axle load36,400 lbs
Water capacity2,312 us gal3,603 us gal
Fuel capacity8,624 lbs (coal)14,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,000 hp (746 kW)
Optimal speed33 mph
Starting effort19,097 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter67 in
Boiler pressure210 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 16 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area24.6 sq ft
Firebox area121 sq ft
Tube heating area834 sq ft
Evaporative heating area955 sq ft
Superheater area240 sq ft
Total heating area1,195 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 06/2023
Eutin-Lübeck Railway No. 11 to 14
Prignitz Railway and Mecklenburg Friedrich-Wilhelm Railway No. 29 to 32, Wittenberg-Perleberg Railway No. 111 and German Reichsbahn class 756
Germany | 1924 | 11 produced
Former ELE 14 and 75 634 of the Reichsbahn in the Aumühle engine shed of the Verein Verkehrsamateure und Museumsbahn
Former ELE 14 and 75 634 of the Reichsbahn in the Aumühle engine shed of the Verein Verkehrsamateure und Museumsbahn
Joachim Lutz
VariantEutin-Lübeck RailwayPrignitz Railway
General
Built1924-19291936-1937
ManufacturerHenschel
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length41 ft 9 15/16 in40 ft 2 5/16 in
Service weight173,504 lbs151,016 lbs
Adhesive weight119,049 lbs99,208 lbs
Axle load37,479 lbs33,069 lbs
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Top speed50 mph
Power Plant
Driver diameter59.1 in
Boiler pressure203 psi188 psi
Expansion typesimple
Boiler
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
last changed: 08 2023
Great Western Railway class 5100 “Large Prairie” and originally class 3100
Great Britain | 1903 | 40 produced
Number 3120, later 51200
Number 3120, later 51200
J.R. Howden, „The Boys’ Book of Locomotives”

One of George Jackson Churchward's first designs for the GWR was a 2-6-2T passenger tank locomotive intended for suburban service. The Prototype number 99 was completed in 1903 and formed the basis of a family of similar locomotives built through 1949, nicknamed “Large Prairies” to distinguish them from the GWR's smaller 2-6-2Ts. As with most of the locomotives in this family, the No. 99's driving wheel diameter was five feet and eight inches. This allowed sufficiently high speeds for their area of operation, but at the same time adequate traction was still available. With outside cylinders, it was modern for a British locomotive of the time, which made a larger cylinder diameter possible using the GWR's loading gauge

The first series consisted of 39 examples, all of which were delivered in 1903. These differed from the prototype in that the tops of the water tanks were sloped slightly at the front to improve visibility. After getting the numbers 3111 to 3149, the number 99 was redrawn to 3100 in 1912. As a result, the locomotives were now known as class 3100, but this changed again in 1927 with the renumbering to the numbers 5100 and 5111 to 5149.

Schematic drawing
Schematic drawing
Locomotive Magazine, August 1905

In 1938 and 1939 the prototype and nine other production examples were rebuilt with two inch smaller wheels and a new boiler with 225 instead of 200 psi pressure. These engines achieved a slightly higher tractive effort and were listed as Class 8100. However, since the increase in tractive power was negligible during operation, no further engines were converted and the class 8100 was used together with the class 5100.

Variant5100rebuilt 8100
General
Built19031938-1939
ManufacturerSwindon
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length41 ft 0 in
Wheelbase31 ft 9 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 9 in
Service weight169,120 lbs
Adhesive weight121,072 lbs
Axle load39,424 lbs
Water capacity2,402 us gal
Fuel capacity10,080 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,025 hp (764 kW)1,150 hp (858 kW)
Optimal speed25 mph
Starting effort25,669 lbf29,752 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter68 in66 in
Boiler pressure200 psi225 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 1/2 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area20.4 sq ft
Firebox area121.8 sq ft
Tube heating area1,145.2 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,267 sq ft
Superheater area82 sq ft
Total heating area1,349 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
George Jackson Churchward
last changed: 02/2022
Great Western Railway class 3150 “Large Prairie”
Great Britain | 1906 | 41 produced
One example is parked in the Gloucester depot in 1948, when it was only used as a pusher locomotive
One example is parked in the Gloucester depot in 1948, when it was only used as a pusher locomotive
Ben Brooksbank / A '3150' 2-6-2T at Gloucester GW Locomotive Depot

Based on the Prairie locomotives later known as the class 3100 and class 5100, the GWR had 41 units of a reinforced variant made as the Class 3150 in 1906. The standard type 2 boiler was replaced with a larger type 4 boiler, which was mounted slightly higher here. Due to the higher weight, the axle load was assigned to the “Red” category instead of “Blue”, which reduced the area of use of the locomotives compared to their predecessors. However, the main suburban routes were string enough to allow the use of these locomotives. So they pulled the heavy local trains on these routes. The machines were retired between 1957 and 1960.

As early as 1938, the then chief engineer Charles Benjamin Collett had started a rebuilding program of five engines, which were to be used for pushing on ramps. These reduced the coupling wheel diameter by five inches to 1,600 mm, increased the boiler pressure from 200 to 225 psi and increased the cylinder diameter by half an inch. This increased the tractive effort by more than 20 percent. These machines were known as the Collett class 3100, but the number remained as five.

General
Built1906
ManufacturerSwindon
Axle config2-6-2T (Prairie) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length41 ft 0 in
Wheelbase31 ft 9 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 9 in
Empty weight144,800 lbs
Service weight182,800 lbs
Water capacity2,402 us gal
Fuel capacity10,080 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,050 hp (783 kW)
Optimal speed26 mph
Starting effort25,669 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter68 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 18 1/2 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area20.6 sq ft
Firebox area129 sq ft
Tube heating area1,349 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,478 sq ft
Superheater area192 sq ft
Total heating area1,670 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
tank locomotive
George Jackson Churchward
last changed: 02/2022
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