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Tender Locomotives 4-6-4 “Hudson”, “Baltic”[Inhalt]
UIC Classification 2'C2'
Canadian Pacific class H1 “Royal Hudson”
Canada | 1929 | 65 produced
H1a No. 2804
H1a No. 2804
collection Taylor Rush
H1b No. 2816 in September 2007 in Milwaukee
H1b No. 2816 in September 2007 in Milwaukee
Brian Cazel

The 65 class H1a to H1e locomotives were built for use in front of express and freight trains. Starting with the H1c, they received partial streamlined fairing. After King George VI's train was pulled by an H1d on his visit to Canada in 1939, all streamlined Hudsons were officially allowed to call themselves “Royal Hudson”. The five H1s built in 1940 finally had oil firing. They were replaced by diesel locomotives by 1960 and some continued to run excursion trips for a longer period of time.

VariantH1a, bH1c, dH1e
General
Built1929-19301937-19381940
ManufacturerMontreal Locomotive Works
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase39 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 2 in
Total wheelbase80 ft 6 in80 ft 10 1/2 in
Service weight351,200 lbs354,000 lbs366,000 lbs
Adhesive weight183,800 lbs186,800 lbs194,000 lbs
Total weight643,100 lbs649,000 lbs
Water capacity14,400 us gal
Fuel capacity42,000 lbs (coal)5,400 us gal (oil)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,100 hp (3,057 kW)4,200 hp (3,132 kW)
Optimal speed58 mph59 mph
Starting effort45,254 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter75 in
Boiler pressure275 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 22 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area80.8 sq ft
Firebox area352 sq ft326 sq ft
Tube heating area3,482 sq ft3,465 sq ft3,466 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,834 sq ft3,791 sq ft3,792 sq ft
Superheater area1,640 sq ft1,542 sq ft
Total heating area5,474 sq ft5,431 sq ft5,334 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 03/2023
German Reichsbahn class 05
Germany | 1935 | 3 produced
Image from Brockhaus Encyclopedia, 1938
Image from Brockhaus Encyclopedia, 1938

In addition to the tank locomotives of the class 61, the need for more powerful express locomotives was also recognized in order to be able to transport regular, heavier express trains at higher speeds. A tender followed among various companies, the winner of which was a streamlined 4-6-4 locomotive from Borsig. In contrast to its competitors, some of which were also designed as steam turbine locomotives, the class 05 was created as a conventional three-cylinder steam locomotive, which was based as far as possible on the design of the standard locomotives. In 1935 road numbers 05 001 and 05 002 were built in the regular design, followed in 1937 by the different 05 003.

The locomotives had coupling wheels measuring 2,300 mm and a two-axle bogie at the front and rear. The streamlining completely covered the running gear, it had a straight lower edge and went down to a few centimeters above the rail heads. The five-axle 2'3 T37 tender was also paneled, but otherwise mostly compatible with the standard design. The tender's paneling was flush with the locomotive's paneling, removable, and closed off the cab at the rear.

Test drives showed an indicated power of around 2,360 hp, but significantly more was possible for a short time. The regular maximum speed was 150 km/h, and 175 km/h was approved to make up for delays. A typical train mass for these speeds was given as 250 tonnes.

Calculations had shown that at 140 km/h a performance increase of 385 hp at the towing hook had been achieved through the fairing. As with all large standard locomotives, the problem was the large length of the heating pipes, which here reached 7,000 mm and tended to lead to tension. In contrast to most other locomotives of this time, the coupling wheels were braked on both sides and, in addition, a speed-dependent control of the brake was achieved by means of a centrifugal governor. This allowed the usual train weight to come to a standstill at a distance of 1,200 meters from the distant signal within a defined time.

During the test drives and in the subsequent scheduled use of the first two engines, they often exceeded the requirements. The rule were trains consisting of five heavy express cars and together weighing almost 250 tonnes. In the process, speeds were kept above the permitted maximum speed over longer distances on several occasions. On May 11, 1935, road number 05 002 drove between Hamburg and Berlin with only four cars. Although no record run was planned, the speedometer needle reached its stop at 200 km/h and stayed there for a long time. Using the milestones and time measurements, an average of 200.4 km/h was calculated over 5 km and 201 km/h for a short time.

In addition to a calculated output of 3,400 hp, this meant a speed record for steam locomotives, which is still disputed today. The record is often attributed to the English “Mallard” with 201.2 km/h, but not only did this trip take place on a slight downward gradient, it also resulted in damage from an overheated bearing on the connecting rods and it is usually claimed that the trip was not adequately documented. Some American locomotives also allegedly reached over 220 km/h, but in these cases there is no reliable documentation.

The third locomotive followed in a very unusual configuration, since at these speeds there were advantages in moving the driver's cab forward. In order to avoid separating the fireman and driver, the boiler was installed backwards. Since the firebox was now on the opposite side of the tender, pulverized coal firing was installed. The coal dust was transported through a pipe that ran through the entire frame and also had bends due to the inner cylinder. Another difference was the installation of a combustion chamber to allow the gases, which were very hot after the rapid combustion, to cool down a little before hitting the heating tubes. The design of 05 003 did not work, as there was a lack of combustion air in many situations and there were frequent blockages due to slag deposits. Finally in 1944, the boiler was rotated to the conventional position and converted to fire regular coal while the cladding was removed.

In contrast to almost all locomotives available in small numbers, the German Federal Railroad did not decommission the three 05s because they could not do without these fast and more powerful engines. During the rebuild in 1950, the remnants of the paneling, which had already been damaged during the war, were also removed from 05 001 and 002. This did not result in any noticeable disadvantages because the network no longer allowed the highest speeds. However, the boiler pressure was reduced from 20 to 16 bars to reduce the wear.

In 1957 and 1958, the three units were replaced by class V 200 diesel locomotives. Road numbers 002 and 003 were then scrapped by 1960, with only the 001 remaining. The paneling of the latter was then largely restored and the locomotive was taken to the Nuremberg Transport Museum.

Variantas builtreduced boiler pressure05 003 (coal dust)
General
Built19351937
ManufacturerBorsig
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length86 ft 2 1/16 in88 ft 7 in
Wheelbase45 ft 7 1/4 in
Fixed wheelbase72 ft 4 7/8 in73 ft 0 3/4 in73 ft 5 7/8 in
Total wheelbase16 ft 8 13/16 in
Empty weight253,090 lbs
Service weight279,325 lbs285,498 lbs
Adhesive weight124,341 lbs130,073 lbs
Axle load41,447 lbs43,211 lbs
Water capacity9,774 us gal9,246 us gal
Fuel capacity22,046 lbs (coal)26,455 lbs (coal dust)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power3,353 hp (2,500 kW)2,328 hp (1,736 kW)3,412 hp (2,544 kW)
Optimal speed64 mph56 mph65 mph
Top speed109 mph
Starting effort33,316 lbf26,655 lbf33,316 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter90.6 in
Boiler pressure290 psi232 psi290 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylindersthree, 17 11/16 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area50.7 sq ft47.4 sq ft
Firebox area199.1 sq ft243.9 sq ft
Tube heating area2,556.4 sq ft2,209.2 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,755.6 sq ft2,453.1 sq ft
Superheater area968.8 sq ft881.6 sq ft
Total heating area3,724.3 sq ft3,334.7 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
streamline
prototype
last changed: 01/2022
French State Railway 232 R
France | 1940 | 3 produced
232 R on an old postcard
232 R on an old postcard

In the 1930s, the Nord was planning a new express locomotive that, due to its size, should achieve lower operating costs with longer trains and should also ideally be suitable for the speed range between 160 and 200 km/h.

In order to be able to determine the ideal cylinder arrangement, Marc de Caso developed the 232 R with a simple three-cylinder engine and the 232 S with a four-cylinder compound engine. Due to the founding of the SNCF, the program was postponed and the three 232 R were therefore only delivered in 1940.

The wheel arrangement chosen was 4-6-4 since it was possible to use a boiler of the same size as a 4-8-2 and at the same time take over large chassis parts from a 4-6-2 and replace the trailing axle with a bogie. A streamlined fairing was necessary in order to be able to reach the required speeds.

The boiler was operated at a relatively high pressure of 20 bar. Otherwise, the locomotives had a Lemaître blast pipe, an ACFI feed water heater and modern injectors. The tender was basically designed for 38 m³ of water, but could only hold 36 m³ with the built-in stoker. On an incline of 0.4 percent, they could tow 685 tonnes at 113.5 km/h, which corresponded to an output at the drawbar of 2,615 hp

The tractive effort calculated from the cylinders is more of a theoretical value that could only hardly be achieved under real conditions. The practical quotient of adhesive weight and tractive effort for three-cylinder locomotives is usually given as 3.5, but it is 2.65 here. Thus, depending on the condition of the rails, there will have been a strong tendency to slip. If you take the value 3.5 as a basis, you get a realistic pulling force of 193 kN or 43,400 pounds

The three locomotives were tested on the Paris-Lille route in front of regular trains. Due to the war, their power could not be fully exploited and they were only approved for 140 km/h. Two locomotives were retired in 1958 and the third in 1961.

General
Built1940
ManufacturerSACM
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length84 ft 0 7/16 in
Wheelbase39 ft 4 1/16 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 4 13/16 in
Total wheelbase74 ft 1 3/8 in
Service weight273,814 lbs
Adhesive weight152,119 lbs
Total weight459,884 lbs
Axle load50,706 lbs
Water capacity9,510 us gal
Fuel capacity25,353 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,353 hp (2,500 kW)
Optimal speed37 mph
Top speed87 mph
Starting effort58,513 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter78.7 in
Boiler pressure290 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylindersthree, 21 1/4 x 27 9/16 in
Boiler
Grate area55.8 sq ft
Firebox area269.1 sq ft
Tube heating area2,099 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,368.1 sq ft
Superheater area742.3 sq ft
Total heating area3,110.3 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
streamline
express
Marc de Caso
last changed: 05/2023
French State Railway 232 S
France | 1941 | 4 produced
232 S 004 at Gare du Nord, Paris
232 S 004 at Gare du Nord, Paris
collection Peter Boor

In addition to the 232 R with a simple three-cylinder engine, the Nord had the 232 S developed with a four-cylinder compound engine. It was therefore also used to test powerful express locomotives for the highest speed range. Due to the founding of the SNCF, the program was postponed and the four 232 S were therefore only delivered in 1941. They had streamlined bodywork that looked very similar to the 232 R. The similar 232 U 1, ordered at the same time, was not completed until 1949.

The Zara valves of the four cylinders were controlled by a rotating Dabeg camshaft control. Otherwise, the locomotives had a Lemaître blast pipe, an ACFI feed water heater and modern injectors. The boiler worked with a pressure of 20 bars. The tender was basically designed for 38 m³ of water, but could only hold 36 m³ with the built-in stoker. On a gradient of 0.5 percent, they could pull 595 tonnes at 113 km/h, which corresponded to an output of 3,400 hp

The four locomotives were tested on two different lines in front of regular trains. Due to the war, the performance of the locomotives could not be fully exploited and they were only approved for 140 km/h. Since the valve gear had problems, it had to be replaced in 1954 with another one with an oscillating camshaft. Their service life ended in 1961 and the SNCF did not order any more express locomotives with a 4-6-4 wheel arrangement, as locomotives with four coupled axles were now used for the heaviest trains.

General
Built1941
ManufacturerSACM
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length84 ft 0 7/16 in
Wheelbase39 ft 4 1/16 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 4 13/16 in
Total wheelbase74 ft 1 3/8 in
Service weight288,144 lbs
Adhesive weight145,505 lbs
Total weight474,214 lbs
Axle load50,706 lbs
Water capacity9,510 us gal
Fuel capacity25,353 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,353 hp (2,500 kW)
Optimal speed56 mph
Top speed87 mph
Starting effort38,258 lbf
with start valve45,910 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter78.7 in
Boiler pressure290 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 17 15/16 x 27 9/16 in
and LP: 26 3/4 x 27 9/16 in
Boiler
Grate area55.8 sq ft
Firebox area269.1 sq ft
Tube heating area2,099 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,368.1 sq ft
Superheater area742.3 sq ft
Total heating area3,110.3 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
streamline
last changed: 05/2023
London & North Eastern class W1 “Hush-Hush”
Great Britain | 1929 | only one produced
flickr/stratfordman72

In 1929, Gresley attempted to build a high-pressure locomotive using the Yarrow boiler from shipbuilding. This boiler consisted of three barrels arranged in a delta shape and was not divided into a firebox and a boiler barrel. It was faired with a streamlined mantle and operated at 450 psi. The chassis came from an A1 Pacific and was expanded to include an additional, independently movable trailing axle. A four-cylinder compound engine was used, which had relatively small cylinders due to the high pressure. Since the boiler did not meet the expectations placed upon it, the locomotive was rebuilt with a conventional boiler in 1936 and was given three cylinders of the same size.

Variantas builtrebuilt
General
Built19291936
ManufacturerDoncaster
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight241,920 lbs
Adhesive weight147,840 lbs
Water capacity6,005 us gal
Fuel capacity20,160 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,000 hp (2,237 kW)2,500 hp (1,864 kW)
Optimal speed73 mph38 mph
Starting effort26,325 lbf41,438 lbf
with start valve31,590 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter80 in
Boiler pressure450 psi250 psi
Expansion typecompoundsimple
Cylindersfour, HP: 12 x 26 in
and LP: 20 x 26 in
three, 20 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area35 sq ft50 sq ft
Firebox area1,114 sq ft
Tube heating area1,484 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,598 sq ft
Superheater area750 sq ft
Total heating area3,348 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
prototype
high pressure
Herbert Nigel Gresley
streamline
last changed: 03/2023
Mexican State Railway class NR-1
Mexico | 1937 | 10 produced
No. 2708 in January 1960 in Puebla
No. 2708 in January 1960 in Puebla
Stan Kistler / collection Taylor Rush

The Nacional de Mexico received ten Hudsons from ALCO in Schenectady in 1937. With an adhesive weight of 170.000 pounds, they were among the lightest North American locomotives with this wheel arrangement. Thanks to their oil firing, they were able to stay in service well into the 1960s. Number 2708 survives today, retired in 1963 and on display in the Plaza de las Tres Centurias in Aguascalientes.

General
Built1937
ManufacturerALCO
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase37 ft 9 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft
Total wheelbase69 ft 1 in
Service weight292,000 lbs
Adhesive weight170,000 lbs
Total weight465,660 lbs
Axle load56,670 lbs
Water capacity8,500 us gal
Fuel capacity4,037 us gal (oil)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,300 hp (2,461 kW)
Optimal speed51 mph
Starting effort41,263 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter73 in
Boiler pressure250 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 22 1/2 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area66.8 sq ft
Firebox area281 sq ft
Tube heating area2,666 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,947 sq ft
Superheater area850 sq ft
Total heating area3,797 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 03/2023
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific (Milwaukee Road) class F6
United States | 1929 | 22 produced
F6 No. 128, the original No. 6403, was in service until February 1954
F6 No. 128, the original No. 6403, was in service until February 1954
collection Taylor Rush

The first Hudsons of the Milwaukee Road were built by Baldwin between 1929 and 1931. While the first 14 locomotives were designated as class F6 and their running boards were broken above the air tank, the last eight were designated as F6a and had straight running boards. They were delivered with driving wheels with a diameter of 79 inches, which later increased to 80 inches due to thicker tires. The coffin feed water heater was apparently integrated into the smokebox for aesthetic reasons.

The boiler had a large firebox, which resulted in a load on the trailing bogie of around 53 tons. The express trains they hauled usually consisted of nine to ten cars, but often eleven to 14 cars and were occasionally even longer. With these trains, the 918-mile round trip between Minneapolis and Harlowton could be completed ten times in 30 days without any servicing stops. A lighter train covered a flat section of 65.6 miles at an average of 92.3 mph

General
Built1929-1931
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase40 ft 9 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Total wheelbase81 ft 7 in
Service weight380,220 lbs
Adhesive weight196,550 lbs
Total weight668,000 lbs
Axle load65,517 lbs
Water capacity15,000 us gal
Fuel capacity40,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,700 hp (2,759 kW)
Optimal speed52 mph
Starting effort45,250 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter80 in
Boiler pressure225 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 26 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area80 sq ft
Firebox area411 sq ft
Tube heating area3,794 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,205 sq ft
Superheater area1,815 sq ft
Total heating area6,020 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 11/2023
New Haven class I-5
United States | 1937 | 10 produced
No. 1408
No. 1408
Ron Ziel, „American Locomotives 1858 to 1949”

In the mid-1930s, the New Haven had a requirement to haul a twelve-car (830 short tons) train at 60 mph (97 km/h) on a 0.6 to 0.7 percent grade. Since only 40 or 45 mph were allowed in many places in the New Haven network, good acceleration was also necessary. Due to the axle load being limited at the same time, a locomotive with a 4-6-4 wheel arrangement was developed for these requirements.

collection Taylor Rush

The ten Class I-5 locomotives were the last new steam locomotives of the New Haven. They were the first in the US to have partial streamlined fairing that still allowed good accessibility for maintenance. The last I-5 class locomotive was retired in 1951.

General
Built1937
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length97 ft 0 in
Wheelbase40 ft 1 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Total wheelbase84 ft 10 in
Service weight365,299 lbs
Adhesive weight192,999 lbs
Total weight697,299 lbs
Axle load64,399 lbs
Water capacity18,000 us gal
Fuel capacity32,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,500 hp (3,356 kW)
Optimal speed65 mph
Starting effort44,108 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter80 in
Boiler pressure286 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 22 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area77.2 sq ft
Firebox area480.2 sq ft
Tube heating area3,336.2 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,816.3 sq ft
Superheater area1,042.4 sq ft
Total heating area4,858.7 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
streamline
last changed: 05/2023
New York Central classes J-1 to J-3 “Hudson”
United States | 1927 | 255 produced
J-3a No. 5448 streamlined in front of another loco in Chicago
J-3a No. 5448 streamlined in front of another loco in Chicago
collection Taylor Rush

The New York Central operated a number of major express trains from New York City, which ran at high speeds mostly in the lowlands and enjoyed increasing popularity. These were primarily the “20th Century Limited” to Chicago and the “Empire State Express” to Detroit. Since the existing Pacific locomotives had reached their limits in the mid-1920s, the task was to develop a new locomotive with a larger boiler. This should also be able to pull 16 or 18 cars instead of the previous twelve. Since there were hardly any inclines on the affected routes, three coupled axles were sufficient.

J-1b No. 5231 in September 1947 in Chicago
J-1b No. 5231 in September 1947 in Chicago
collection Taylor Rush

With the “Superpower” locomotives with the wheel arrangement 2-8-4 (Berkshire), it had already been confirmed that a significantly larger firebox could be installed with a second trailing axle, which enabled a significantly higher boiler output. So the Pacific was expanded with the second trailing axle and thus the first steam locomotive in North America with the wheel arrangement 4-6-4 was created. Although the Milwaukee Road had already developed a comparable locomotive shortly before and wanted to name the wheel arrangement as “Baltic”, the designs were actually implemented later. Thus, the New York Central was able to designate the new wheel arrangement and named it “Hudson”, after the river they were supposed to travel along.

J-3a No. 5442 around 1950
J-3a No. 5442 around 1950
Dennis Dupier / collection Taylor Rush

For starting, all Hudsons from the first series received a booster on the second axle of the rear bogie. Despite this, they were said to have performed relatively poorly at low speeds, but developed well over 4,000 hp at high speeds. Officially, they were designed for a top speed of 110 mph. However, according to unofficial information, they are said to have reached speeds of at least 123 mph when driving in delays. The standard performance for the J-1 was 1,270 short tons at an average speed of 55 mph

Works photo of the J-1a
Works photo of the J-1a
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, February 1928

There were 205 examples of the J-1 in five series, which were designated as J-1a to J-1e. A total of 60 examples of these went to other Big Four affiliates. This were 30 for the Michigan Central and 30 for the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis. From 1928 the J-2 was built in parallel, which went directly back to an order from Boston & Albany and was built 20 times just for them. It had slightly smaller coupling wheels and a Coffin type feedwater heater

In 1934, the last J-1e built received an Art Deco streamlined fairing designed by Carl F. Kantola. The aim was to emulate the diesel-powered streamlined trains that were just emerging at the time. Ten of 50 examples of the J-3a built from 1937 received factory streamlined fairing designed by Henry Dreyfuss. The J-3a otherwise differed from the J-1 by having a smaller superheater and a boiler pressure of 275 psi. However, this was later reduced to 265 psi

The J-3a in particular was characterized by the fact that it was extremely low-maintenance and could cover long distances non-stop. The interval between two major repairs was between 185,000 and 200,000 miles, which corresponded to around two years of service. Additionally, it used seven-axle tenders with a laden weight of more than 400.000 pounds, which could cover long distances before having to refill water and coal. The last Hudsons served until 1957, when New York Central's conversion to diesel traction was complete. Thus they lived even longer than the even more powerful Niagaras built after them. Unfortunately, they met the same fate as many other US steam locomotives, so that despite their historical significance, they were all scrapped.

VariantJ-1a to eJ-1a to e with thermosiphonsJ-2a to cJ-3a streamlined
General
Built1927-19311928-19311937-1938
ManufacturerALCOALCO, LimaALCO
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length97 ft 2 3/8 in
Wheelbase40 ft 4 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Service weight359,800 lbs346,500 lbs353,000 lbs365,500 lbs
Adhesive weight189,000 lbs184,500 lbs187,500 lbs201,800 lbs
Total weight676,200 lbs558,700 lbs559,800 lbs785,500 lbs
Axle load63,000 lbs61,500 lbs62,500 lbs67,267 lbs
Water capacity14,000 us gal10,000 us gal18,000 us gal
Fuel capacity56,000 lbs (coal)34,000 lbs (coal)32,000 lbs (coal)92,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power3,900 hp (2,908 kW)4,150 hp (3,095 kW)4,275 hp (3,188 kW)
Optimal speed59 mph56 mph65 mph
Top speed110 mph
Starting effort42,366 lbf47,600 lbf41,860 lbf
Booster10,900 lbf10,600 lbf12,100 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter79 in75 in79 in
Boiler pressure225 psi240 psi265 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 25 x 28 intwo, 22 1/2 x 29 in
Boiler
Grate area81.5 sq ft82 sq ft
Firebox area281 sq ft352.5 sq ft281 sq ft360 sq ft
Tube heating area4,203 sq ft4,203.5 sq ft4,203 sq ft3,827 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,484 sq ft4,556 sq ft4,484 sq ft4,187 sq ft
Superheater area1,951 sq ft1,745 sq ft
Total heating area6,435 sq ft6,507 sq ft6,435 sq ft5,932 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
streamline
booster
last changed: 06/2022
Victorian Railways class R
Australia | 1951 | 70 produced
R 710 on a works photo
R 710 on a works photo

The class R was only created after the Second World War as an express locomotive to replace the class A2 ten-wheelers. By installing a stoker, they wanted to ensure that it would perform well with coal of varying grades. The 70 locos arrived at the same time as some diesel and electric locos, giving them a very short career in service pulling express trains. They were then put into a wide variety of services, in which they performed well despite often poor maintenance. Today there are still six locomotives, four of which are still operational and partly had multiple operators. The R 766 was even converted to standard gauge

General
Built1951-1953
ManufacturerNorth British
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge5 ft 3 in (Irish broad gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length77 ft 3 3/16 in
Wheelbase36 ft 3 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 10 in
Total wheelbase67 ft
Service weight240,016 lbs
Adhesive weight131,040 lbs
Total weight418,544 lbs
Axle load43,680 lbs
Water capacity10,809 us gal
Fuel capacity13,440 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power2,200 hp (1,641 kW)
Optimal speed44 mph
Starting effort31,653 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter73 in
Boiler pressure215 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 21 1/4 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area42 sq ft
Firebox area285 sq ft
Tube heating area1,958 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,243 sq ft
Superheater area462 sq ft
Total heating area2,705 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 07/2023
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  • Imperial (UK): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in long tons and volumes in imperial gallons
  • Imperial (US): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in pounds, and volumes in US gallons
  • Individual: Depends on the country of origin of each locomotive
Operator names

Here you can set the display of railway company names.

  • Short: Abbreviation or short form of the name
  • Standard: commonly used name, partially translated to English
  • Complete: full name in local language