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Tender Locomotives 4-6-0 “Ten-wheeler”[Inhalt]
UIC Classification 2'C
Badenian IV e
German Reichsbahn class 3870
Germany | 1894 | 83 produced
Locomotive Magazine, October 1903

The IV e was developed for passenger and express trains in order to supplement or replace the older, predominantly four-coupled locomotives in this role. It was all about the steep Black Forest Railway, where the existing locomotives could no longer cope with the increasing number of passengers. Thus, from 1894, Grafenstaden from Alsace supplied six-coupled engines with four-cylinder compound engines. They were the first locomotives with a 4-6-0 wheel arrangement in Germany, and they were also the first to use a de Glehn type engine on a locomotive with three coupled axles, i.e. with drive on two axles.

The running gear was built on an inside plate frame, while the bogie was designed with the outside frame known from Grafenstaden, despite the problematic running characteristics. The special feature of this engine rarely used in Germany was that the high-pressure cylinders were on the outside and the low-pressure cylinders on the inside, although the latter had a larger diameter. In order to achieve sufficient traction, the coupling wheels had a diameter of just 1,600 mm, which limited the speed to 90 km/h. During test runs, power of around 800 hp was measured and a 250-tonne train could be transported on the flat at 75 km/h.

Production comprised a total of 83 units up to 1901, which were also supplied by MBG Karlsruhe. Shortly after the turn of the century, the more powerful engines of classes II d and IV f pushed the IV e out of express service, and as a result it was only used in front of regular passenger trains. With the beginning of the First World War, decommissioning began, so that the Reichsbahn was able to take over 35 more units in 1925 and classify them as the class 3870. The last were retired in 1932. Today, none of the locomotives remain, as the only existing one kept as a cutaway model in a museum burned down with the museum during World War II.

General
Built1894-1901
ManufacturerGrafenstaden, MBG Karlsruhe
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length57 ft 5 3/4 in
Wheelbase24 ft 5 5/16 in
Fixed wheelbase11 ft 9 3/4 in
Total wheelbase45 ft 6 1/16 in
Empty weight116,404 lbs
Service weight128,529 lbs
Adhesive weight89,287 lbs
Total weight222,887 lbs
Axle load29,762 lbs
Water capacity3,566 us gal
Fuel capacity8,818 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power799 hp (596 kW)
Optimal speed32 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort15,992 lbf
with start valve19,190 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure174 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 13 3/4 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 21 5/8 x 25 3/16 in
Boiler
Grate area22.6 sq ft
Firebox area120 sq ft
Tube heating area1,262.6 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,382.6 sq ft
Total heating area1,382.6 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
passenger
De Glehn compound
last changed: 01/2022
Bavarian C V
German Reichsbahn class 173
Germany | 1896 | 43 produced
Die Lokomotive, August 1925

The class C V machines were the first express locomotives in Europe to have a 4-6-0 wheel arrangement. They went back to a design that Maffei had created on its own account and presented in 1896 at the Bavarian State Exhibition. The original design was intended for both passenger and freight trains and therefore had coupled wheels with a diameter of only 1,640 mm. The Bavarian State Railways bought this locomotive and put it into service as a test. It was finally decided to purchase it as a pure express locomotive with a coupled wheel diameter of 1,870 mm and only in a reinforced version. However, the increase in the size of the wheels was accompanied by a reduction in the tractive effort, so that in normal operation the maximum speed of 90 km/h could only be used with trains of a maximum of 160 tonnes.

At the request of Anton Hammel, director of Maffei, a bar frame that was still rarely found in Germany was used. While the trend in the north of the country was back towards two-cylinder locomotives with single steam expansion, Hammel ushered in the era of express train locomotives with four-cylinder compound engines in southern Germany with the C V. The thinking prevailed here that the disadvantages of the more maintenance-intensive inner cylinders and cranked axles are more than compensated for by the lower consumption.

Between 1899 and 1901, 42 examples were built, which were pushed into lower-level services by new locomotives from 1903 onwards. They remained in service longer in their new working area, but after the First World War a relatively large proportion of 17 locomotives had to be handed over to France as reparations. The remaining locomotives were taken over by the Reichsbahn and became the class 173. This showed that they were still classified as express locomotives. They were retired by 1930.

Variantprototypeproduction
General
Built18961899-1901
ManufacturerMaffei
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length61 ft 9 3/4 in
Wheelbase27 ft 2 3/8 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 11 7/8 in
Service weight145,946 lbs
Adhesive weight101,853 lbs
Axle load33,951 lbs
Water capacity5,680 us gal
Fuel capacity15,432 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power1,184 hp (883 kW)
Optimal speed35 mph40 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort21,727 lbf19,055 lbf
with start valve26,072 lbf22,866 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter64.6 in73.6 in
Boiler pressure203 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 14 15/16 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 24 x 25 3/16 in
Boiler
Grate area28.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,646.9 sq ft
Total heating area1,646.9 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Anton Hammel
last changed: 04/2022
Bavarian S 3/5
German Reichsbahn class 174-5
Germany | 1903 | 69 produced
Die Lokomotive, October 1904

In addition to the S 2/5, the S 3/5 was procured as an express locomotive with a 4-6-0 wheel arrangement. Both were technically very closely related, but the S 3/5 with its three coupled axles was intended more for heavy express trains and routes with gradients of one percent. Both locomotives were almost identical in terms of boiler and engine, which resulted in roughly the same power output. In the first locomotives delivered, the boiler pressure was 14 bars, but it was increased to 16 bars from the following year and thus reached the same value as its sister, which was only manufactured from 1904.

Both locomotives are characterized by the use of a bar frame. On the S 3/5, the diameter of the coupling wheels was 130 mm smaller, resulting in a slightly lower boiler. The result of this different design was that the locomotive developed a higher adhesive weight and greater tractive effort, but was somewhat less suitable for sustained running at the top speed range.

In 1906, a test locomotive was fitted with a superheater and the diameter of the cylinders was increased slightly. This measure enabled the power to be increased by around 170 hp, which meant that trains weighing up to 450 tonnes could be pulled at 100 km/h instead of just 300 tonnes at the same speed as before. Based on this experience, production was switched over in 1907 and only the superheated variant was built. The latter was designated the S 3/5 H, while the original variant later became the S 3/5 N. As a result, between 1903 and 1911, a total of 39 saturated engines and 30 superheated ones were manufactured.

Schematic drawing with dimensions
Schematic drawing with dimensions
Die Lokomotive, October 1904

After some machines had to be handed over after the First World War, the Reichsbahn took on 20 saturated engines as class 174 and 24 superheated engines as class 175. Since the newer S 3/6 was very expensive to purchase, the machines from the older series were also completely converted to superheated steam in the years that followed. Despite these conversions, this variant began to be phased out as early as 1932. After the war, all the remaining locomotives were on Bavarian territory, but they were all badly worn and were therefore completely phased out by 1948.

VariantS 3/5 N 1st seriesS 3/5 N 2nd/3rd seriesS 3/5 H
General
Built19031904-19071906-1911
ManufacturerMaffei
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length63 ft 4 13/16 in
Length loco38 ft 7 3/4 in
Wheelbase29 ft 0 7/16 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 9 3/16 in
Total wheelbase54 ft 9 15/16 in
Empty weight138,230 lbs143,300 lbs
Service weight153,882 lbs154,103 lbs157,630 lbs
Adhesive weight99,208 lbs101,413 lbs105,822 lbs
Axle load33,069 lbs33,841 lbs35,274 lbs
Water capacity5,548 us gal5,759 us gal
Fuel capacity15,432 lbs (coal)17,637 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power1,086 hp (810 kW)1,240 hp (925 kW)
Estimated power952 hp (710 kW)
Optimal speed40 mph39 mph40 mph
Top speed68 mph
Starting effort15,278 lbf17,847 lbf19,767 lbf
with start valve18,334 lbf21,416 lbf23,720 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter73.6 in
Boiler pressure203 psi232 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 13 3/16 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 22 7/16 x 25 3/16 in
four, HP: 13 3/8 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 22 7/16 x 25 3/16 in
four, HP: 14 3/16 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 23 1/4 x 25 3/16 in
Boiler
Grate area35.3 sq ft34.7 sq ft
Firebox area156.1 sq ft
Tube heating area2,055.9 sq ft1,603.8 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,212 sq ft1,759.9 sq ft
Superheater area371.4 sq ft
Total heating area2,212 sq ft2,131.3 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Von Borries compound
Anton Hammel
last changed: 01/2022
Bavarian P 3/5 N
German Reichsbahn class 380
Germany | 1905 | 51 produced
No. 3804
No. 3804
Die Lokomotive, August 1906
General
Built1905-1908
ManufacturerMaffei
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length60 ft 9 5/16 in
Wheelbase26 ft 8 7/8 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 5 5/8 in
Total wheelbase52 ft 6 3/8 in
Service weight151,678 lbs
Adhesive weight99,649 lbs
Axle load33,731 lbs
Water capacity4,808 us gal
Fuel capacity14,330 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power939 hp (700 kW)
Optimal speed31 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort19,079 lbf
with start valve22,895 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter64.6 in
Boiler pressure218 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 13 3/8 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 22 7/16 x 25 3/16 in
Boiler
Grate area28 sq ft
Firebox area123.8 sq ft
Tube heating area1,657.6 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,781.4 sq ft
Total heating area1,781.4 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
Von Borries compound
last changed: 08 2023
Bavarian P 3/5 H
German Reichsbahn class 384
Germany | 1921 | 80 produced
Die Lokomotive, September 1910

The P 3/5 H was a passenger locomotive that was ordered by the Bavarian Group Administration shortly after the Reichsbahn was founded. Since there was no final class scheme at that time, the locomotives were given a Bavarian designation for the time being. In 1925 they became the class 384, the 80 examples built were numbered 38 401 to 38 480.

The basis of the development was the P 3/5 N, which already had a four-cylinder compound engine, but was only designed to use saturated steam. The chassis was adopted almost unchanged, but slightly larger cylinders and a larger boiler with a superheater were installed. In addition, there was a more spacious cab, as was the state of the art at this time. Despite the same top speed, the power and economy increased, and a larger tender also further increased the range. So it turned out that these locomotives, which were actually only developed for normal passenger trains, were even used in front of express trains. From 1924 all surviving P 3/5 N were rebuilt to a superheated P 3/5 H.

Schematic drawing with dimensions
Schematic drawing with dimensions
Die Lokomotive, September 1910

Like their predecessors from Bavaria, all P 3/5 H received a green paint finish ex works. Although the repainting took place in 1925, not all locomotives could be repainted directly to the new color scheme. It was not until around 1930 that some were given the new black and red color scheme as part of a general inspection. Fortunately, all of the P 3/5 H survived the Second World War. After the end of the war, they were all on the territory of what later became the Bundesbahn, as they were mainly used in the Bavarian area. The rest of their life their working area didn't change either. The 38 432 was the last to be retired in 1955.

General
Built1921
ManufacturerMaffei
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length63 ft 9 5/16 in
Wheelbase26 ft 8 7/8 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 2 7/8 in
Total wheelbase54 ft 5 9/16 in
Empty weight144,844 lbs
Service weight158,953 lbs
Adhesive weight103,838 lbs
Axle load34,613 lbs
Water capacity5,759 us gal
Fuel capacity17,637 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power1,184 hp (883 kW)
Optimal speed36 mph
Top speed56 mph
Starting effort21,131 lbf
with start valve25,357 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter64.6 in
Boiler pressure218 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 14 3/16 x 25 3/16 in
and LP: 23 1/4 x 25 3/16 in
Boiler
Grate area29.8 sq ft
Firebox area139.9 sq ft
Tube heating area1,536 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,675.9 sq ft
Superheater area375.9 sq ft
Total heating area2,051.8 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
Von Borries compound
last changed: 01/2022
British Rail Standard class 5MT
Great Britain | 1951 | 172 produced
flickr/Historical Railway Images

When developing a class 5 standard locomotive for mixed service, a Pacific locomotive first came up for discussion. However, since this was considered too expensive, the choice fell on the wheel arrangement 4-6-0. This offered the additional advantage that, for a given total weight, a larger proportion was accounted for by the adhesive weight. The basis for the development was Stanier's LMS Class 5, which had proven itself in all areas of application and was still in production at the time.

The improvements still to be made to this mainly concerned the production and operating costs, which were to be reduced through the use of standardized assemblies and the simplest possible maintenance. A self-cleaning smoke box and a shaking grate for emptying the ash under the firebox were installed for faster turnaround after the end of the shift. The cab was standardized with many similarities to the other standard classes. Some pipes in the cab have been moved to the outside for easier access and cheaper production. The boiler had almost the same dimensions as the Black Five, but was made of manganese steel instead of nickel. In addition, the drivers were increased by two inches and the cylinder diameter by half an inch.

The production of the standard locomotive followed the production of the Black Five almost seamlessly. Between April 1951 and January 1952 only 30 were initially built in the workshops in Derby. A further 100 were later built at Derby and 42 at Doncaster, with the last being delivered in June and May 1957 respectively. The locomotives were used in many regions and were just as versatile as their predecessors. It is reported to have been more economical at higher speeds than the Black Five and the drivers would have credited it with a top speed of just under 100mph.

Variants with a double blast pipe and a 2-8-0 goods variant were proposed, but these were not implemented. This was mainly due to British Railways' modernization plans from 1955, which prepared the phase-out of steam traction. The locomotives were retired between 1964 and 1968 and today there are five of which two were still operational at the beginning of 2022.

Variantwith tender BR1with tender BR1Cwith tender BR1F
General
Built1951-1957
ManufacturerDerby, Doncaster
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length62 ft 7 in
Wheelbase27 ft 3 in
Fixed wheelbase15 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase52 ft 1 in
Service weight170,240 lbs
Adhesive weight130,032 lbs
Total weight284,816 lbs289,408 lbs293,888 lbs
Axle load44,128 lbs
Water capacity5,104 us gal6,755 us gal5,104 us gal
Fuel capacity15,680 lbs (coal)20,160 lbs (coal)15,680 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,850 hp (1,380 kW)
Optimal speed45 mph
Starting effort26,124 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter74 in
Boiler pressure225 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 19 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area28.7 sq ft
Firebox area171 sq ft
Tube heating area1,479 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,650 sq ft
Superheater area358 sq ft
Total heating area2,008 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
Robert Arthur Riddles
last changed: 02/2022
Buenos Aires Great Southern classes 12A, 12B and 12D
Argentina | 1907 | 61 produced

Beginning in 1907, the Buenos Aires Great Southern received a series of Ten-Wheelers with different cylinder configurations from British manufacturers. The first was the class 12A with a two-cylinder compound engine, which was built a total of 32 times by Beyer, Peacock and North British and was later converted to simple expansion and superheated. Also in 1907, nine class 12B locomotives were built by the Vulcan Foundry, using four cylinder compound engines, three of which were superheated in 1924. In 1914 Beyer, Peacock built 20 class 12D locomotives, which had a simple two-cylinder engine and a superheater

Variant12A12B12B superheated12D
General
Built190719241914
ManufacturerBeyer, Peacock & Co., North BritishVulcan FoundryBAGSBeyer, Peacock & Co.
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge5 ft 6 in (Indian broad gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase25 ft 11 in26 ft 1 1/2 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 8 in14 ft 3 in
Service weight145,824 lbs154,560 lbs156,632 lbs150,584 lbs
Adhesive weight98,560 lbs103,040 lbs109,424 lbs111,384 lbs
Total weight247,150 lbs257,600 lbs266,952 lbs251,938 lbs
Axle load32,855 lbs34,347 lbs36,475 lbs37,240 lbs
Water capacity4,203 us gal4,804 us gal4,203 us gal
Fuel capacity15,680 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power800 hp (597 kW)850 hp (634 kW)1,200 hp (895 kW)950 hp (708 kW)
Optimal speed34 mph27 mph44 mph25 mph
Starting effort15,001 lbf19,754 lbf17,559 lbf23,770 lbf
with start valve18,001 lbf23,705 lbf21,071 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter72 in
Boiler pressure200 psi225 psi200 psi160 psi
Expansion typecompoundsimple
Cylinderstwo, HP: 27 1/2 x 26 in
and LP: 19 x 26 in
four, HP: 14 x 26 in
and LP: 23 x 26 in
two, 22 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area25 sq ft28 sq ft25 sq ft
Firebox area139 sq ft136 sq ft135 sq ft
Tube heating area1,495 sq ft1,677 sq ft1,241 sq ft1,205 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,634 sq ft1,813 sq ft1,377 sq ft1,340 sq ft
Superheater area324 sq ft310 sq ft
Total heating area1,634 sq ft1,813 sq ft1,701 sq ft1,650 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 03/2023
Canadian Pacific class D10
Canada | 1905 | 507 produced
D10g No. 1074 in Magog, Quebec
D10g No. 1074 in Magog, Quebec

The class D10 referred to a series of ten-wheelers of the Canadian Pacific, which, with a total number of 507, were widely used throughout Canada. They were simple in construction and easy to maintain, but had a larger boiler than ten-wheelers of the 19th century and a superheater. The first locomotives were built as camelbacks, but were rebuilt after about two years. Unlike most locomotives in Canada, they did not have a completely enclosed cab.

No. 784 in its original form as Camelback
No. 784 in its original form as Camelback
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, January 1906

There were the subclasses D10a to D10k, which also showed differences within a subclass. Basically they all used the same firebox, but different numbers of tubes and different superheaters. The driver diameter was 63 inches and the stroke of the cylinders was always 28 inches. For cylinder diameter and boiler pressure, either the combination of 22.5 inches and 180 psi or smaller cylinders with 21 inches and a boiler pressure increased to 200 psi were used. By installing arch tubes in the firebox, its heating surface later increased. The retirements took place between 1938 and 1965.

VariantD10a, b, cD10dD10e, fD10g, h, j
General
Built1905-1913
ManufacturerCLC, Montreal, CPR, ALCO
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase26 ft 1 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 10 in
Total wheelbase56 ft 4 in
Service weight190,000 lbs205,000 lbs
Adhesive weight141,000 lbs156,000 lbs
Total weight317,000 lbs354,000 lbs
Axle load47,000 lbs52,000 lbs
Water capacity24,000 us gal
Fuel capacitycoal6,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,700 hp (1,268 kW)1,650 hp (1,230 kW)1,700 hp (1,268 kW)1,750 hp (1,305 kW)
Optimal speed33 mph31 mph33 mph
Top speed65 mph
Starting effort33,320 lbf34,425 lbf33,320 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure200 psi180 psi200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 21 x 28 intwo, 22 1/2 x 28 intwo, 21 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area49 sq ft
Firebox area180 sq ft209 sq ft
Tube heating area2,233 sq ft2,209 sq ft2,100 sq ft2,022 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,413 sq ft2,418 sq ft2,309 sq ft2,231 sq ft
Superheater area374 sq ft408 sq ft472 sq ft488 sq ft
Total heating area2,787 sq ft2,826 sq ft2,781 sq ft2,719 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
camelback
last changed: 11/2023
Cape Government Railways class 6 (1893)
South African class 6
South Africa | 1893 | 40 produced
SAR No. 432 in Nigel, Gauteng
SAR No. 432 in Nigel, Gauteng
Col André Kritzinger

In order to expand the capacity for hauling heavy passenger trains in the western and central parts of the Cape Colony, H.M. Beatty developed the first Class 6 locomotives to the specifications of Superintendent Michael Stephens. With a driver diameter of 54 inches, they were quite suitable for faster trains for the proportions of cape-gauge locomotives of the 1890s. The 40 examples were supplied by Dübs in Glasgow and introduced a new three-axle tender carrying 5 and a half tons of coal and 2,846 gallons of water.

The locomotives fully met the expectations placed on them and proved to be extremely inexpensive to maintain. In 1897, ten units were sold to the Oranje Free State Railways and operated there as Class 6-L. When the Orange Free State fell to British troops after the Second Boer War, they came to the Central South African Railways as Class 6-L1s. Their manager even suggested using the locomotives to set up a 48-hour connection for the 870 mile route from Cape Town to Johannesburg.

With the formation of the South African Railways they continued to be listed simply as Class 6 because they were the first of their kind. As the Class 6 was gradually replaced by more powerful locomotives in the role of fast passenger trains, it developed a reputation as the „jack of all trades”. They were to be found in front of almost all types of trains for several decades, and seven were even delivered to Sudan during World War II. The last examples were not retired until 1973, when they had been in service for 79 and 80 years respectively. Three examples remain today, one of which is operational and used intermittently by Rovos Rail to power the Pride of Africa luxury train.

Variantas builtrebuilt belpaire
General
Built1893-1894
ManufacturerDübs & Co.
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge3 ft 6 in (Cape gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length50 ft 8 1/2 in51 ft 7 1/4 in
Wheelbase20 ft 3 1/4 in
Fixed wheelbase11 ft
Total wheelbase41 ft 9 1/8 in
Service weight99,792 lbs114,408 lbs
Adhesive weight77,896 lbs89,712 lbs
Total weight165,984 lbs180,600 lbs
Axle load26,824 lbs30,016 lbs
Water capacity2,846 us gal
Fuel capacity12,320 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power525 hp (391 kW)650 hp (485 kW)
Optimal speed18 mph19 mph
Starting effort18,924 lbf21,290 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter54 in
Boiler pressure160 psi180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 17 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area16.8 sq ft16.6 sq ft
Firebox area95 sq ft111 sq ft
Tube heating area946 sq ft1,287.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,041 sq ft1,398.5 sq ft
Total heating area1,041 sq ft1,398.5 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
H.M. Beatty
last changed: 05/2022
Chicago & North Western class R-1
United States | 1901 | 325 produced
No. 1429 in August 1954 in Ashland, Wisconsin
No. 1429 in August 1954 in Ashland, Wisconsin
collection Greg Maxwell

In order to increase the power of the ten-wheelers for freight train use, the R-1 was developed on the basis of the R class. The biggest limitation of the R was the firebox, which was located between the frames and could not be enlarged any further.

Therefore, the R-1 received a shallower but wider firebox that stood on the frame. This allowed their width to be increased from 40 to 64 inches. Its walls were corrugated to reduce expansion cracks and increase maintenance intervals. Other changes included increasing the cylinder diameter from 20 to 21 inches, a boiler pressure of 200 instead of 190 psi, and piston instead of slide valves.

No. 444 in the year 2012
No. 444 in the year 2012
Andrew Filer

Between 1901 and 1908 240 locomotives were built by ALCO in Schenectady and 85 by Baldwin. In the beginning, all locomotives had an inside Stephenson valve gear, but in the final series from 1907, an outside Heusinger valve gear was used.

At least 87 locomotives were later fitted with oil firing. 299 units were superheated around 1926. The heating surface of the firebox was once again significantly enlarged by installing arch pipes and thermosiphons

As more powerful locomotives became available, the R-1 was progressively pushed out of main line freight service on branch lines. The first larger numbers were phased out from 1939 and by 1957 the last one had disappeared. Three pieces are still preserved today, two of which are being restored.

Variantas builtsuperheated
General
Built1901-19081926
ManufacturerALCO, BaldwinChicago & North Western
Axle config4-6-0 (Ten-wheeler) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase25 ft 10 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 10 in
Total wheelbase57 ft 9 in
Service weight179,500 lbs186,000 lbs
Adhesive weight135,500 lbs139,000 lbs
Total weight319,000 lbs330,000 lbs
Water capacity7,500 us gal
Fuel capacity20,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,500 hp (1,119 kW)1,550 hp (1,156 kW)
Optimal speed31 mph32 mph
Starting effort30,940 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 21 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area46.3 sq ft47.2 sq ft
Firebox area150.8 sq ft216.7 sq ft
Tube heating area2,808.2 sq ft1,746.3 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,959 sq ft1,963 sq ft
Superheater area476 sq ft
Total heating area2,959 sq ft2,439 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 01/2023
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  • Metric: Lengths in meters, weights in tonnes, and volumes in cubic meters
  • Imperial (UK): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in long tons and volumes in imperial gallons
  • Imperial (US): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in pounds, and volumes in US gallons
  • Individual: Depends on the country of origin of each locomotive
Operator names

Here you can set the display of railway company names.

  • Short: Abbreviation or short form of the name
  • Standard: commonly used name, partially translated to English
  • Complete: full name in local language