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Tender Locomotives 4-6-2 “Pacific”[Inhalt]
UIC Classification 2'C1'
Atlanta & West Point class P-74
United States | 1926 | 2 produced
collection Josh Scott

The closely linked Atlanta & West Point and the Western Railway of Alabama had to pull the Southern Railway's "Crescent" between Atlanta, Georgia and Montgomery, Alabama. So they each ordered one locomotive, which was given the numbers 290 (AWP) and 190 (WRA). Like the Southern Ps-4, they were based on the USRA Heavy Pacific, but like them also had smaller drivers. The diameter was initially 73 inches and was later increased to 74 inches with thicker tires, which explains the designation P-74.

Both machines were operated together. While one hauled the northbound Crescent, the other simultaneously took over the southbound one. They were retired in 1954, after which the 190 was scrapped. The 290 was saved by the “290 club”, but remained non-operational for the time being. It was finally refurbished between 1986 and 1989 and was used until 1992, when maintenance work on the running gear was required. It now resides at the Southeastern Railway Museum in Duluth, Georgia, awaiting visual restoration.

General
Built1926
ManufacturerLima
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase37 ft
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Total wheelbase72 ft 5 in
Service weight303,500 lbs
Adhesive weight192,500 lbs
Total weight504,000 lbs
Axle load64,500 lbs
Water capacity11,000 us gal
Fuel capacity30,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,200 hp (2,386 kW)
Optimal speed44 mph
Starting effort46,892 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter74 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 27 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area70.8 sq ft
Firebox area327 sq ft
Tube heating area3,342 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,669 sq ft
Superheater area990 sq ft
Total heating area4,659 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 01/2024
Badenian IV f
Germany | 1907 | 35 produced
Side view of No. 763 (company photo)
Side view of No. 763 (company photo)

The IV f was an express locomotive with which the Munich company Maffei had won a competition held by the Grand Duchy of Baden State Railways in 1905. After three pre-series models built by Maffei, 32 more machines followed from the Karlsruhe mechanical engineering company. It was the first locomotive in Germany with the axle configuration 4-6-2, which is also known internationally under the American designation “Pacific”. The well-known Bavarian S 3/6 was later to become a development of the IV f.

The Pacific design and the bar frame instead of a plate frame were approaches that had been taken over from American locomotive construction. Nevertheless, the entire locomotive received a filigree and streamlined appearance, which was in contrast to the bulky American locomotives. In addition, the four-cylinder compound engine based on the Von Borries design was a typical feature of southern German express train locomotives.

Since the IV f was also to be used in mountainous areas away from the main Rhenish route, its 1,800 mm diameter coupled wheels were relatively small. As a result, a higher tractive force could be achieved on inclines than with larger wheels, but the entire engine reached high rotational speeds on flat land at high speeds, which also led to increased wear and consumption. To enlarge the grate area, the firebox was pulled behind the driving wheels and widened so that it is clearly visible from the outside. It was only because of this change and the resulting increased overhang that the 2'C wheel arrangement had to be abandoned and the trailing axle added. By balancing the load between the two rear axles, it was possible to increase the adhesive weight by around three tons on well-developed routes.

When it was taken over by the Reichsbahn in 1925, 22 of the 35 engines were still in use, which became the class 182. While the more numerous former S 3/6 remained in service for a long time despite the high-maintenance power plant, all examples of the former IV f were retired by 1930.

Variant1907 variant1912 variant1913 variant
General
Built1907-191119121913
ManufacturerMaffei, MBG Karlsruhe
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length69 ft 3 9/16 in
Wheelbase36 ft 9 5/16 in
Fixed wheelbase12 ft 8 3/4 in
Total wheelbase60 ft 2 7/16 in
Empty weight179,015 lbs174,606 lbs175,488 lbs
Service weight194,668 lbs197,754 lbs189,597 lbs
Adhesive weight109,129 lbs108,688 lbs108,467 lbs
Axle load36,376 lbs36,156 lbs
Water capacity3,963 us gal5,283 us gal
Fuel capacity11,023 lbs (coal)15,432 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power1,746 hp (1,302 kW)
Optimal speed41 mph
Top speed62 mph
Starting effort26,947 lbf
with start valve32,336 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter70.9 in
Boiler pressure232 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 16 3/4 x 24 in
and LP: 25 9/16 x 26 3/8 in
Boiler
Grate area48.4 sq ft
Firebox area157.7 sq ft
Tube heating area2,089 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,246.6 sq ft
Superheater area538.2 sq ft
Total heating area2,784.8 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Von Borries compound
last changed: 01/2022
Badenian IV h
German Reichsbahn class 183
Germany | 1918 | 20 produced
18 323 as a memorial in front of the University of Applied Sciences in Offenburg
18 323 as a memorial in front of the University of Applied Sciences in Offenburg
Peter Buck

The Grand Duchy of Baden State Railways used the IV f from 1907 on its 413 km long main line from Mannheim to Constance. However, this was unable to cope with long, fast routes with its driving wheels, which were only 1,800 mm large. Thus, in 1915, the IV h was ordered from Maffei in Munich, where the IV f and the S 3/6 had already been manufactured. Since only use on flat routes was planned, the IV h received driving wheels with a diameter of 2,100 mm. This negatively affected acceleration, but made it possible to maintain high speeds for a long time. The certification was only for 110 km/h, which was 10 km/h faster than its predecessor series. It was only in the thirties that it proved on test drives at speeds of up to 155 km/h that it ran very smoothly even at higher speeds. It was therefore equipped with more powerful brakes and approved for 140 km/h.

The locomotive was powered by a four-cylinder compound engine, which combined characteristics of the De Glehn and Von Borries types. The low-pressure cylinders drove the second coupled wheel set and had to be located on the outside due to their large diameter. While the outer high-pressure cylinders on the De Glehn type were pulled back to achieve shorter connecting rods, the outer cylinders were at the height of the smoke chamber. Thus, the high-pressure cylinders were on the inside and drove the first set of coupled wheels. Since they were also pulled very far forward, they could be clearly seen from the outside.

When they were taken over by the Reichsbahn, they became the class 183. After about ten years of service on the Baden trunk line, the 20 built IV h were replaced by class 01 standard locomotives and relocated to other locations. Although they had a higher fuel consumption than the newer locomotives, it later turned out that they could almost keep up with the 01 and even surpassed the 03 in terms of power. After all, the power measurements were in a range from 1,950 to 2,200 hp

Die Lokomotive, August 1925

After the war, all 19 remaining examples went to the Bundesbahn and only road number 18 314 ended up being traded for an S 3/6 to the Reichsbahn, where it was fundamentally rebuilt. All others were initially retired because their Number was very small. However, three were subsequently reactivated and modernized for use as brake locomotives or for other trials. The 18 316 was preserved and was again in running condition between 1995 and 2002, but was parked again after damage.

Variantas builtimproved running gear
General
Built1918-1920
ManufacturerMaffei
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length76 ft 2 9/16 in
Wheelbase40 ft 4 5/8 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 3 5/8 in
Total wheelbase64 ft 4 5/8 in
Empty weight192,133 lbs
Service weight211,644 lbs
Adhesive weight119,049 lbs
Total weight350,535 lbs
Axle load39,683 lbs
Water capacity7,819 us gal
Fuel capacity19,842 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power2,172 hp (1,620 kW)
Optimal speed51 mph
Top speed68 mph87 mph
Starting effort27,026 lbf
with start valve32,431 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter82.7 in
Boiler pressure232 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 17 5/16 x 26 3/4 in
and LP: 26 3/4 x 26 3/4 in
Boiler
Grate area53.8 sq ft
Firebox area167.9 sq ft
Tube heating area2,251.8 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,419.7 sq ft
Superheater area835.3 sq ft
Total heating area3,255 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
two-axle compound
last changed: 01/2022
Baltimore & Ohio class P-7
United States | 1927 | 20 produced
Baltimore & Ohio
No. 5303 “President Madison” without streamlined fairing
No. 5303 “President Madison” without streamlined fairing
Howard Locomotive Photographs
No. 5301 “President Adams” with streamlined fairing
No. 5301 “President Adams” with streamlined fairing
collection Taylor Rush

In 1927, the B&O put a total of 20 examples of the P-7 class into service, which at the time were the most powerful Pacifics ever. The power was achieved with a coupling wheel diameter of 80 inches and cylinders measuring 27 by 28 inches. The firebox, with a combustion chamber and thermosiphons, came in at 394 square feet. The first locomotive was manufactured with a booster on the trailing axle, the others were only prepared for its later installation. They were given names after the first 20 Presidents of the United States, beginning with No. 5300 “President Washington”.

The P-7 pulled the most important express trains of the B&O. Over time, there was no uniform modernization of the class, but various conversions. This resulted in the classes P-7a to P-7d, which differed primarily in the heating area and, among other things, had different superheaters. The P-7a and P-7d also featured a streamlined fairing. They pulled important trains such as the “Royal Blue” and the “Cincinnatian”. Their service ended in 1958 after the introduction of diesel locomotives in express service.

VariantP-7P-7arebuilt P-7b, cP-7d
General
Built1927193719431946
ManufacturerBaldwinMount Clare
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase37 ft 1 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Service weight326,000 lbs340,000 lbs332,000 lbs347,500 lbs
Adhesive weight201,000 lbs207,000 lbs204,000 lbs211,000 lbs
Total weight544,000 lbs579,500 lbs550,000 lbs713,500 lbs
Axle load68,000 lbs70,000 lbs69,000 lbs71,000 lbs
Water capacity11,000 us gal13,000 us gal11,000 us gal20,000 us gal
Fuel capacity34,000 lbs (coal)39,000 lbs (coal)34,000 lbs (coal)56,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,750 hp (2,796 kW)3,800 hp (2,834 kW)3,650 hp (2,722 kW)3,800 hp (2,834 kW)
Optimal speed48 mph49 mph47 mph49 mph
Top speed85 mph
Starting effort49,882 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter80 in
Boiler pressure230 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 27 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area70.3 sq ft
Firebox area394 sq ft429 sq ft379 sq ft429 sq ft
Tube heating area3,452 sq ft3,448 sq ft3,264 sq ft3,414 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,846 sq ft3,877 sq ft3,643 sq ft3,843 sq ft
Superheater area932 sq ft908 sq ft950 sq ft
Total heating area4,778 sq ft4,809 sq ft4,551 sq ft4,793 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
streamline
last changed: 06/2022
Bavarian S 3/6
German Reichsbahn class 184-5
Germany | 1908 | 159 produced
18 478 in the original paint scheme as No. 3673 of the K.Bay.Sts.B.
18 478 in the original paint scheme as No. 3673 of the K.Bay.Sts.B.
Rainer Lippert

The Bavarian S 3/6, later designated as the class 184-5, was probably one of the best-known express steam locomotives in Germany. Developed by the Munich company Maffei, it was not only procured by the Royal Bavarian State Railways from 1908, but even the Deutsche Reichsbahn commissioned new series until 1931.

Although more than 150 km/h had already been achieved with the S 2/6 trial locomotive in 1906, the speed to be reached with the S 3/6 was reduced to 120 km/h, which was more suitable for everyday use. Their performance program stipulated that a train weighing 400 tonnes should reach at least 115 km/h on the level. The same train should still be pulled at 95 km/h at 0.5 percent and at 65 km/h at one percent.

The locomotive was based on the Baden IV f and was given a driving wheel diameter of 1,870 mm as a compromise. This enabled the S 3/6 to cover long distances at a high line speed without excessive wear on the engine, without having to sacrifice too much traction for climbing. As with previous Bavarian express train locomotives, the running gear was built on a bar frame

Die Lokomotive, November 1908

Of the 159 locomotives of series a to o, only 18 locomotives of series d and e were built with wheel diameter of 2,000 mm in order to be able to drive at a constant speed of 120 km/h on flat lines between the largest cities in Bavaria. These were mainly the Munich-Nuremberg and Munich-Augsburg routes, on which there were hardly any significant inclines. They were soon given the nickname “Hochhaxige” (“the high-heeled one”) to distinguish them from the rest of the S 3/6.

Traction was provided by a four-cylinder compound engine, which enabled very smooth running and led to consumption that did not need to fear comparison with the later two-cylinder standard locomotives. Despite the significantly higher maintenance effort due to the internal cylinders, the S 3/6 continued to be procured in several series even after the Deutsche Reichsbahn was founded. This can be explained, among other things, by the fact that the new standard express train locomotive of the class 01 had an axle load of 20 tonnes and many main lines were not strengthened accordingly at the time. With an axle load of 18 tonnes, the last S 3/6 could also be used on almost all main routes until a lighter standard express locomotive became available with the class 03.

After the Second World War, all locomotives came to the Bundesbahn, where they were extensively modernized. Despite their still comparatively very good performance and economy, however, all of them were retired between 1961 and 1965, since a miscalculation during the rebuilding process had meanwhile made it necessary to reduce the boiler pressure and thus the power.

Variantseries a-c and f-iseries d and eseries kseries l-o
General
Built1908-1911, 1913-191819121923-19241927-1931
ManufacturerMaffei
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length70 ft 2 3/8 in72 ft 5 7/8 in69 ft 11 1/4 in75 ft 0 1/16 in
Length loco45 ft 8 1/16 in
Wheelbase37 ft 3 1/4 in37 ft 5 5/8 in36 ft 8 9/16 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 7 3/4 in
Empty weight176,370 lbs177,472 lbs
Service weight194,007 lbs195,109 lbs207,234 lbs
Adhesive weight105,822 lbs108,026 lbs116,183 lbs
Total weight313,056 lbs
Axle load35,715 lbs36,156 lbs39,463 lbs
Water capacity6,921 us gal8,586 us gal6,921 us gal8,374 us gal
Fuel capacity19,842 lbs (coal)22,046 lbs (coal)19,842 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power1,743 hp (1,300 kW)1,810 hp (1,350 kW)
Optimal speed45 mph48 mph44 mph42 mph
Top speed75 mph
Starting effort24,725 lbf23,118 lbf26,373 lbf27,734 lbf
with start valve29,670 lbf27,742 lbf31,648 lbf33,281 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter73.6 in78.7 in73.6 in
Boiler pressure218 psi232 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 16 3/4 x 24 in
and LP: 26 3/8 x 26 3/8 in
four, HP: 17 5/16 x 24 in
and LP: 26 3/8 x 26 3/8 in
Boiler
Grate area48.8 sq ft
Firebox area157.4 sq ft157.2 sq ft
Tube heating area2,193.7 sq ft2,124.8 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,351.1 sq ft2,281.9 sq ft
Superheater area538.2 sq ft798.3 sq ft
Total heating area2,889.2 sq ft3,080.2 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Von Borries compound
Anton Hammel
last changed: 01/2022
Belgian Railway type 10
Belgium | 1910 | 58 produced
Type 10 on a 1928 Cockerill commercial
Type 10 on a 1928 Cockerill commercial
Katalog „Les chemins de Fer Belges”

A few years before the First World War, Jean-Baptiste Flamme developed a very powerful boiler that was to be installed in a freight locomotive and an express locomotive at the same time. So from 1909 the type 36 with the 2-10-0 wheel arrangement and from 1910 the type 10 Pacific were built. Since the boiler was relatively short with a large diameter and the chassis of the Pacific naturally had a long overall wheelbase, the appearance of the Locomotive somewhat unusual with a long overhang in front of the smoke box.

The boiler had a grate area of five square meters and narrowed in front of the firebox. It delivered 2,250 hp, making the type 10 one of the most powerful Pacific locomotives in Europe. Since the bogie hardly had to carry any weight from the smoke box, the load was kept within limits despite the four cylinders with simple steam expansion. Due to the special arrangement of the cylinders, the inner cylinders were accessible from above, which made maintenance easier. Although the cylinders were in one plane, the inner ones drove the first driving axle and the outer ones the second. The problem, however, was the weight of the large firebox, which made the load of the trailing axle too high. The Type 36 didn't have this problem as the weight was carried by the coupled axles

As a result, the second batch from 1912 was delivered with a smaller grate surface in order to reduce the axle load on the trailing axle. However, this reduced the power to 1,950 hp, while the service weight of the locomotives was reduced by around four tons. A total of 58 pieces were made by 1914, when production was stopped due to the war.

Locomotive Magazine, July 1910

In the 1920s, the locomotives received double chimneys and new feed pumps. From 1931 there was a major conversion with new feedwater heaters, a larger superheater, new safety valves and smoke deflectors. The result was an output of 2,700 hp for the first batch and 2,400 hp for the second batch. 1938 followed the installation of Kylchap blast pipes. A large proportion of the engines were retired in 1956 and some continued to run on a different route for three more years.

Variantfirst batchsecond batchfirst batch rebuiltsecond batch rebuilt
General
Built1910-19121912-1914from 1931
ManufacturerCockerill, Anglo-Franco-Belge, Saint Léonard, Zimmerman & Hanrez, La Meuse, FUF Haine-Saint-Pierre, La Hestre, Tubize
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length69 ft 6 1/4 in
Wheelbase37 ft 5 13/16 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 5 7/16 in
Service weight224,871 lbs216,053 lbs253,531 lbs246,917 lbs
Adhesive weight125,663 lbs
Total weight343,039 lbs
Axle load41,888 lbs
Water capacity8,454 us gal
Fuel capacity15,432 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power2,219 hp (1,655 kW)1,924 hp (1,435 kW)2,663 hp (1,986 kW)2,367 hp (1,765 kW)
Optimal speed32 mph28 mph38 mph34 mph
Top speed75 mph
Starting effort44,597 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter78 in
Boiler pressure203 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylindersfour, 19 11/16 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area53.8 sq ft49.3 sq ft53.8 sq ft
Firebox area215.3 sq ft
Tube heating area2,583.3 sq ft2,486.5 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,798.6 sq ft2,701.7 sq ft
Superheater area667.4 sq ft815.9 sq ft
Total heating area3,466 sq ft3,517.6 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
Jean-Baptiste Flamme
last changed: 06/2022
Boston & Maine class P-4
United States | 1934 | 10 produced
P-4a No. 3710 “Peter Cooper”
P-4a No. 3710 “Peter Cooper”
collection Richard Driver

The last ten Pacifics that the Boston & Maine purchased were also the last Pacifics that Lima manufactured. Their task was regional traffic over distances of up to around 200 miles, and they were designed for an average speed of 70 mph or 113 km/h. The firebox contained three thermic syphons and arch tubes. The coffin feed water heater was concealed in the smokebox. Initially there was a skyline casing on the top of the boiler, which was later removed. The locomotives from the two production years 1934 and 1937 were designated P-4a and P-4b. They were given names that were chosen in a competition among kindergarten children and students. Only 3713, which is currently being overhauled in Steamtown, has been preserved.

General
Built1934, 1937
ManufacturerLima
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase36 ft 11 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Total wheelbase77 ft 7 in
Service weight339,200 lbs
Adhesive weight209,500 lbs
Total weight580,000 lbs
Axle load68,900 lbs
Water capacity12,000 us gal
Fuel capacity37,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,600 hp (2,685 kW)
Optimal speed56 mph
Starting effort40,918 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter80 in
Boiler pressure260 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 23 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area66.9 sq ft
Firebox area320 sq ft
Tube heating area3,528 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,848 sq ft
Superheater area966 sq ft
Total heating area4,814 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 01/2023
British Rail Standard class 7 “Britannia”
Great Britain | 1951
No 70013 “Oliver Cromwell” at Leicester North Station in June 2013
No 70013 “Oliver Cromwell” at Leicester North Station in June 2013
Jim
Varianttender BR1tender BR1D
General
Built1951-1954
ManufacturerCrewe
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length68 ft 9 in
Wheelbase35 ft 9 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Service weight210,560 lbs
Adhesive weight137,760 lbs
Total weight320,656 lbs329,952 lbs
Axle load45,360 lbs
Water capacity5,104 us gal6,005 us gal
Fuel capacity15,680 lbs (coal)20,160 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power2,700 hp (2,013 kW)
Optimal speed54 mph
Starting effort32,162 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter74 in
Boiler pressure250 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 20 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area42 sq ft
Firebox area210 sq ft
Tube heating area2,475 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,685 sq ft
Superheater area718 sq ft
Total heating area3,403 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 08 2023
Canadian Pacific class G3
Canada | 1919 | 171 produced
The surviving G3c No. 2317 in 1989
The surviving G3c No. 2317 in 1989
Mark Harrell / US Parks Service

After the First World War, the Canadian Pacific realized that a significantly more powerful Pacific was needed for the new, six-axle heavyweight passenger cars. Chief engineer William H. Winterrowd then developed the class G3 with a driving wheel diameter of 75 inches, which was intended for the flatter routes. A total of 26 examples of the G3a, b and c variants, which were almost identical in construction, were completed by 1923.

In 1926, 25 examples of the G3d followed, the most important innovation of which was a boiler made of nickel steel. This allowed the boiler pressure to be increased from 200 psi (13.8 bars) to 250 psi (17.2 bars). Although the cylinders were made smaller at the same time, the starting tractive effort could be increased.

Twelve years later, the 27 examples of the G3e and f followed, which in turn benefited from new advances in boiler construction and now had a boiler pressure of 275 psi (19 bars). The cylinder diameter was reduced again, while the starting tractive effort remained about the same. The G3g, h and j reached the largest number with 93, which only followed in the forties and were almost identical to the series e and f in terms of the engine. However, they had a boiler with fewer tubes and were used with smaller tenders. They were real multi-purpose locomotives and were also used in front of freight trains.

Although it was precisely the later variants that came up at a time when other railways had already switched to 4-6-4 or 4-8-4, they were relatively strong compared to other Pacifics and had a better ratio of adhesive to service weight than other locomotives and had less of a tendency to slip. The period of use ended in 1959, when there were already enough diesel locomotives for their area of operation. Today only number 2317 still exists, which belongs to class G3c.

VariantG3a to cG3dG3e and fG3g, h and j
General
Built1919-192319261938, 19401942-1945, 1948
ManufacturerAngus ShopsMontreal Locomotive WorksCanadian Locomotive Co.Canadian Locomotive Co., Montreal Locomotive Works
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase34 ft 6 in35 ft
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 2 in
Service weight299,000 lbs306,500 lbs321,000 lbs323,000 lbs
Adhesive weight181,500 lbs183,900 lbs198,000 lbs199,600 lbs
Total weight477,000 lbs544,500 lbs543,000 lbs519,760 lbs
Power
Power Plant
Driver diameter75 in
Boiler pressure200 psi250 psi275 psi
Cylinderstwo, 25 x 30 intwo, 23 x 30 intwo, 22 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area65 sq ft
Firebox area297.6 sq ft291 sq ft
Tube heating area3,232.4 sq ft2,982 sq ft3,207 sq ft2,885 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,530 sq ft3,273 sq ft3,498 sq ft3,176 sq ft
Superheater area803 sq ft864 sq ft1,473 sq ft1,475 sq ft
Total heating area4,333 sq ft4,137 sq ft4,971 sq ft4,651 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
last changed: 06/2022
Canadian Pacific class G5
Canada | 1946 | 102 produced
Contemporary photo of No. 1201, still in existence today
Contemporary photo of No. 1201, still in existence today
collection Ralph Currie

Starting in 1946, the Canadian Pacific had class G5 Pacific locomotives built for use on branch lines. With a adhesive weight of only 151.000 pounds, these had a low axle load by North American standards. Contrary to the field of application of most locomotives with this wheel arrangement, they were intended for use in front of passenger and freight trains, which was also noticeable in the driving wheel diameter of 70 inches.

From an initially planned number of 600, only 102 were finally built, as more and more diesel locomotives were put into service. For the same reason, only ten years after the end of production, the first examples were retired and in 1960 the last ones disappeared. Today there are still three pieces that are currently only statically on display, but could possibly be made operational again.

General
Built1946-1948
ManufacturerMontreal Locomotive Works, Canadian Locomotive Co.
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length76 ft 4 1/8 in
Wheelbase33 ft 7 1/2 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft
Service weight229,500 lbs
Adhesive weight151,000 lbs
Total weight420,500 lbs
Axle load50,333 lbs
Water capacity9,600 us gal
Fuel capacity28,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power2,750 hp (2,051 kW)
Optimal speed52 mph
Top speed85 mph
Starting effort34,000 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter70 in
Boiler pressure250 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 20 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area45.6 sq ft
Firebox area199 sq ft
Tube heating area2,377 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,576 sq ft
Superheater area744 sq ft
Total heating area3,320 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
last changed: 06/2022
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  • preferred units
  • spelling of railway company names

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Display of units

Here you can set the desired unit system for the technical data.

  • Metric: Lengths in meters, weights in tonnes, and volumes in cubic meters
  • Imperial (UK): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in long tons and volumes in imperial gallons
  • Imperial (US): Lengths in feet/inches, weights in pounds, and volumes in US gallons
  • Individual: Depends on the country of origin of each locomotive
Operator names

Here you can set the display of railway company names.

  • Short: Abbreviation or short form of the name
  • Standard: commonly used name, partially translated to English
  • Complete: full name in local language