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Steam Locomotives of the New York Central (NYC)[Inhalt]
Mohawk & Hudson “DeWitt Clinton”
United States | 1831 | only one produced
The replica at the 1949 Chicago Railroad Fair
The replica at the 1949 Chicago Railroad Fair
Joe+Jeanette Archie

In 1826, the Mohwak & Hudson Railroad was founded to construct a rail line between Schenectady and Albany as a faster alternative to compete with the Erie Canal. For the route to be opened in 1831, a locomotive was manufactured at the West Point Foundry, which should take over the operation with passenger cars converted from horse carriages. As an affront to Governor DeWitt Clinton, who was always on the side of the canal, the locomotive was named after him.

In contrast to the Grasshoppers built at the same time, the “DeWitt Clinton” already had a horizontal boiler barrel, a steam dome and a smokebox with a chimney at the front end of the boiler. It also already had an attached tender for storing supplies.

With the coal from the Lackawanna area originally used in the first test runs, no sufficient range could be achieved, and so the coal was soon replaced by coke. Using the new fuel, the 16-mile distance was covered at an average of between 25 and 27 mph. Up to 18 passengers could be transported in each of the three cars.

The replica in the Henry Ford Museum
The replica in the Henry Ford Museum
Dsdugan

The original locomotive was scrapped after only two years of service and replaced with newer models. Nevertheless, it laid the foundation for the fact that the canal lost importance from the 1860s. In 1893, the New York Central as the successor to the Mohawk & Hudson made a working replica, which was shown at the Chicago World's Fair that same year. It was in regular service into the 1950s and has since been in the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan.

General
Built1831
ManufacturerWest Point Foundry
Axle config0-4-0 (Four-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length loco12 ft 10 in
Wheelbase6 ft
Fixed wheelbase6 ft
Service weight7,000 lbs
Adhesive weight7,000 lbs
Axle load3,527 lbs
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power15 hp (11 kW)
Optimal speed25 mph
Starting effort381 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter54 in
Boiler pressure50 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 5 1/2 x 16 in
Boiler
Evaporative heating area184 sq ft
Total heating area184 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
prototype
last changed: 06/2022
New York Central No. 999
later class C-14 or N
United States | 1893 | only one produced
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, August 1897

Faced with competition from the Pennsylvania Railroad, the New York Central planned to build a promotional high-speed express locomotive that would also be displayed at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair. With the approval of Cornelius Vanderbild II, William Buchanan developed the Class N, which was to be built in a single copy with the number 999, based on the Class I, which was already capable of speeds of around 80 mph. Although it was only a single example, it was intended to pull the “Empire State Express” between New York City and Buffalo.

Sectional drawing
Sectional drawing
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, December 1896

The magic number of 100 mph was set as the targeted top speed. The drivers were enlarged from the original 70 inches to 86 inches, which were the largest wheels on a 4-4-0 in history. The bogie and tender wheels were also enlarged to relieve the bearings at higher speeds. With the newly developed boiler, great importance was attached to a large firebox in order to increase the evaporation capacity through a direct heating surface. This was augmented by the “Water Table” developed by Buchanan, which lay in the firebox and was exposed to direct heat. Also, the boiler pressure was increased from 180 to 190 psi to partially compensate for the larger drivers.

Today's appearance with smaller wheels in the Chicago Museum
Today's appearance with smaller wheels in the Chicago Museum
Sean Lab

Immediately after completion in April 1893, the initially secret test runs were undertaken with four six-axle passenger cars. The controversial value of 112.5 mph was reached during the record run on May 10th. Although this was achieved on a slight gradient of 0.3 percent, a calculated boiler output of more than 2,000 hp would have been necessary with this train weight, which the boiler of the 999 could only have achieved for a brief moment. Today, the value can no longer be reliably verified, since the speeds at that time could only be determined with a stopwatch. Most likely at least 100 mph was actually achieved, while some voices assume little more than 80 mph

After the world exhibition, the 999 was used in front of scheduled trains, whereby the low tractive effort was noticeable due to the large coupled wheels. The diameter was thus reduced first to 78 and in 1899 to 70 inches, bringing it in line with the other 4-4-0 locomotives of the New York Central. It also ended its service in front of the Empire State Express, whereupon it was used as class C-14 with a boiler pressure of only 180 psi in front of less important trains.

After initially being retired in 1924, it almost ended up being scrapped. Fortunately, since the identity of the locomotive, which was now listed as number 1086, was recognized, it was refurbished instead. It spent the time that followed with its old number again, but with the smaller wheels, at various exhibitions and special trips. In 1952 it was finally phased out, since it was now almost impossible to use a steam locomotive for advertising purposes. It was given to the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago in 1962, where it can still be found today.

General
Built1893
ManufacturerWest Albany
Axle config4-4-0 (American) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase24 ft
Fixed wheelbase8 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase58 ft 10 in
Service weight124,000 lbs
Adhesive weight84,000 lbs
Total weight204,000 lbs
Axle load42,000 lbs
Water capacity3,500 us gal
Fuel capacity15,680 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,200 hp (895 kW)
Optimal speed46 mph
Top speed90 mph
Starting effort16,462 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter85 in
Boiler pressure190 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 19 x 24 in
Boiler
Grate area30.8 sq ft
Firebox area232.9 sq ft
Tube heating area1,697.1 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,930 sq ft
Total heating area1,930 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
prototype
last changed: 06/2022
Toledo & Ohio Central class G-95a
United States | 1902 | 25 produced
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, February 1903

The Toledo & Ohio Central, a subsidiary of the New York Central, procured a total of 25 consolidations from the Rogers Locomotive and Machine Works in 1902 and 1903. With a driver diameter of just 54 inches, they were downright freight machines. Deliveries included 20 pieces in 1902 and another five pieces in 1903.

The locos had a boiler that tapers towards the front and a Belpaire firebox. The leading axle was connected to the first driving axle by means of a compensating lever, as were the three rear coupled axles to each other. The second coupled axle was designed without wheel flanges in order to be able to run through curves better.

General
Built1902-1903
ManufacturerRogers
Axle config2-8-0 (Consolidation) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase23 ft
Fixed wheelbase15 ft
Total wheelbase50 ft 9 1/4 in
Service weight156,200 lbs
Adhesive weight140,700 lbs
Total weight261,000 lbs
Axle load35,175 lbs
Water capacity5,000 us gal
Fuel capacity20,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power875 hp (652 kW)
Optimal speed19 mph
Starting effort29,467 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter54 in
Boiler pressure180 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 20 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area30.3 sq ft
Firebox area165.7 sq ft
Tube heating area1,760 sq ft
Evaporative heating area1,925.8 sq ft
Total heating area1,925.8 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 01/2023
New York Central class H-5
United States | 1912 | 661 produced
H-5p No. 1591 in the year 1946 in Collinwood, Ohio
H-5p No. 1591 in the year 1946 in Collinwood, Ohio
Richard J. Cook / collection Taylor Rush

Most of the H-5 class Mikados came from the rebuilds of a total of 482 G-5 class Consolidations. Not only were locomotives converted directly from the New York Central, but also by its subsidiaries Boston & Albany and Big Four. The firebox remained largely unchanged and the boiler barrel was lengthened. While the cylinders were enlarged, the boiler pressure was reduced by 20psi. The combination of these measures allowed to increase speed. Overall, the adhesive weight also increased. After the G-5 had already been built in different versions, there were also many differences within the H-5 class. In addition to the converted locomotives, 179 were newly built.

VariantH-5a to h, k, m, nH-5lH-5p, q, tH-5r
General
Built1912-19141913-19151915-1916, 19251916
ManufacturerALCOALCO, LimaALCO
Axle config2-8-2 (Mikado) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight280,000 lbs281,100 lbs289,300 lbs289,700 lbs
Adhesive weight215,500 lbs213,300 lbs216,100 lbs215,900 lbs
Total weight431,600 lbs439,800 lbs448,700 lbs
Axle load53,875 lbs53,325 lbs54,025 lbs53,975 lbs
Water capacity7,500 us gal8,000 us gal
Power
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure190 psi180 psi190 psi200 psi
Cylinderstwo, 25 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area56.5 sq ft
Firebox area230 sq ft230.9 sq ft
Tube heating area3,801 sq ft3,864 sq ft3,780 sq ft3,865.1 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,031 sq ft4,094 sq ft4,010 sq ft4,096 sq ft
Superheater area870 sq ft880 sq ft
Total heating area4,901 sq ft4,964 sq ft4,880 sq ft4,976 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
rebuilt
last changed: 04/2023
New York Central classes J-1 to J-3 “Hudson”
United States | 1927 | 255 produced
J-3a No. 5448 streamlined in front of another loco in Chicago
J-3a No. 5448 streamlined in front of another loco in Chicago
collection Taylor Rush

The New York Central operated a number of major express trains from New York City, which ran at high speeds mostly in the lowlands and enjoyed increasing popularity. These were primarily the “20th Century Limited” to Chicago and the “Empire State Express” to Detroit. Since the existing Pacific locomotives had reached their limits in the mid-1920s, the task was to develop a new locomotive with a larger boiler. This should also be able to pull 16 or 18 cars instead of the previous twelve. Since there were hardly any inclines on the affected routes, three coupled axles were sufficient.

J-1b No. 5231 in September 1947 in Chicago
J-1b No. 5231 in September 1947 in Chicago
collection Taylor Rush

With the “Superpower” locomotives with the wheel arrangement 2-8-4 (Berkshire), it had already been confirmed that a significantly larger firebox could be installed with a second trailing axle, which enabled a significantly higher boiler output. So the Pacific was expanded with the second trailing axle and thus the first steam locomotive in North America with the wheel arrangement 4-6-4 was created. Although the Milwaukee Road had already developed a comparable locomotive shortly before and wanted to name the wheel arrangement as “Baltic”, the designs were actually implemented later. Thus, the New York Central was able to designate the new wheel arrangement and named it “Hudson”, after the river they were supposed to travel along.

J-3a No. 5442 around 1950
J-3a No. 5442 around 1950
Dennis Dupier / collection Taylor Rush

For starting, all Hudsons from the first series received a booster on the second axle of the rear bogie. Despite this, they were said to have performed relatively poorly at low speeds, but developed well over 4,000 hp at high speeds. Officially, they were designed for a top speed of 110 mph. However, according to unofficial information, they are said to have reached speeds of at least 123 mph when driving in delays. The standard performance for the J-1 was 1,270 short tons at an average speed of 55 mph

Works photo of the J-1a
Works photo of the J-1a
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, February 1928

There were 205 examples of the J-1 in five series, which were designated as J-1a to J-1e. A total of 60 examples of these went to other Big Four affiliates. This were 30 for the Michigan Central and 30 for the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis. From 1928 the J-2 was built in parallel, which went directly back to an order from Boston & Albany and was built 20 times just for them. It had slightly smaller coupling wheels and a Coffin type feedwater heater

In 1934, the last J-1e built received an Art Deco streamlined fairing designed by Carl F. Kantola. The aim was to emulate the diesel-powered streamlined trains that were just emerging at the time. Ten of 50 examples of the J-3a built from 1937 received factory streamlined fairing designed by Henry Dreyfuss. The J-3a otherwise differed from the J-1 by having a smaller superheater and a boiler pressure of 275 psi. However, this was later reduced to 265 psi

The J-3a in particular was characterized by the fact that it was extremely low-maintenance and could cover long distances non-stop. The interval between two major repairs was between 185,000 and 200,000 miles, which corresponded to around two years of service. Additionally, it used seven-axle tenders with a laden weight of more than 400.000 pounds, which could cover long distances before having to refill water and coal. The last Hudsons served until 1957, when New York Central's conversion to diesel traction was complete. Thus they lived even longer than the even more powerful Niagaras built after them. Unfortunately, they met the same fate as many other US steam locomotives, so that despite their historical significance, they were all scrapped.

VariantJ-1a to eJ-1a to e with thermosiphonsJ-2a to cJ-3a streamlined
General
Built1927-19311928-19311937-1938
ManufacturerALCOALCO, LimaALCO
Axle config4-6-4 (Hudson) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length97 ft 2 3/8 in
Wheelbase40 ft 4 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Service weight359,800 lbs346,500 lbs353,000 lbs365,500 lbs
Adhesive weight189,000 lbs184,500 lbs187,500 lbs201,800 lbs
Total weight676,200 lbs558,700 lbs559,800 lbs785,500 lbs
Axle load63,000 lbs61,500 lbs62,500 lbs67,267 lbs
Water capacity14,000 us gal10,000 us gal18,000 us gal
Fuel capacity56,000 lbs (coal)34,000 lbs (coal)32,000 lbs (coal)92,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power3,900 hp (2,908 kW)4,150 hp (3,095 kW)4,275 hp (3,188 kW)
Optimal speed59 mph56 mph65 mph
Top speed110 mph
Starting effort42,366 lbf47,600 lbf41,860 lbf
Booster10,900 lbf10,600 lbf12,100 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter79 in75 in79 in
Boiler pressure225 psi240 psi265 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 25 x 28 intwo, 22 1/2 x 29 in
Boiler
Grate area81.5 sq ft82 sq ft
Firebox area281 sq ft352.5 sq ft281 sq ft360 sq ft
Tube heating area4,203 sq ft4,203.5 sq ft4,203 sq ft3,827 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,484 sq ft4,556 sq ft4,484 sq ft4,187 sq ft
Superheater area1,951 sq ft1,745 sq ft
Total heating area6,435 sq ft6,507 sq ft6,435 sq ft5,932 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
streamline
booster
last changed: 06/2022
New York Central class K-3
United States | 1911 | 231 produced
K-3q No. 4889
K-3q No. 4889

After the K-2 class Pacifics, which did not have a superheater from the factory, the New York Central had a larger number of superheated K-3 built between 1911 and 1925. Their task was to pull the heaviest express trains. Numerous series from the K-3a to the K-3r were produced, with the latter being built for the Big Four. The different series were almost identical in the basic dimensions, but there were differences in the boiler. Some of the locomotives had a booster on the trailing axle

VariantK-3a, c, d, gK-3f, h, i, mK-3nK-3p, q
General
Built1911-1913191319181920
ManufacturerALCO, BaldwinALCO
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase36 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Total wheelbase68 ft71 ft68 ft 3 in68 ft 1 in
Service weight271,000 lbs296,500 lbs288,800 lbs288,000 lbs
Adhesive weight172,000 lbs194,500 lbs189,400 lbs194,500 lbs
Total weight424,700 lbs503,510 lbs447,000 lbs455,600 lbs
Axle load57,333 lbs64,833 lbs63,133 lbs64,833 lbs
Water capacity7,500 us gal10,000 us gal
Fuel capacity24,000 lbs (coal)32,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power2,100 hp (1,566 kW)
Estimated power2,100 hp (1,566 kW)2,150 hp (1,603 kW)
Optimal speed43 mph44 mph43 mph
Starting effort30,898 lbf
Booster9,710 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter79 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 23 1/2 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area56.5 sq ft
Firebox area231 sq ft230 sq ft231 sq ft
Tube heating area3,193 sq ft3,531 sq ft3,192 sq ft3,193 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,424 sq ft3,762 sq ft3,422 sq ft3,424 sq ft
Superheater area823 sq ft893 sq ft823 sq ft832 sq ft
Total heating area4,247 sq ft4,655 sq ft4,245 sq ft4,256 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
booster
last changed: 03/2023
New York Central class K-5
United States | 1926 | 35 produced
Streamlined K-5s No. 4917 in November 1941 at Indianapolis, Indiana
Streamlined K-5s No. 4917 in November 1941 at Indianapolis, Indiana
Howard W. Ameling / collection Taylor Rush

The K-5 class designated the heaviest Pacifics of the New York Central System. Built primarily for the subsidiaries, they were divided into the K-5 and K-5a subclasses. Numbers 4915 and 4917 were fitted with streamlining in 1936 designed by Henry Dreyfuss and called the “upside down bathtub”. These two pulled important express trains like the “Mercury” and became subclass K-5b.

VariantK-5, K-5aK-5b
General
Built1926-19271936
ManufacturerALCO
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase36 ft 11 in
Fixed wheelbase13 ft 8 in
Total wheelbase79 ft 5 1/2 in
Service weight297,500 lbs317,000 lbs
Adhesive weight184,500 lbs193,800 lbs
Total weight572,000 lbs609,300 lbs
Axle load61,500 lbs64,600 lbs
Water capacity15,000 us gal
Fuel capacity32,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,300 hp (2,461 kW)3,375 hp (2,517 kW)
Optimal speed55 mph54 mph
Starting effort38,600 lbf39,541 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter79 in
Boiler pressure205 psi210 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 25 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area67.8 sq ft
Firebox area257 sq ft
Tube heating area3,695 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,952 sq ft
Superheater area1,158 sq ft
Total heating area5,110 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
streamline
last changed: 07/2023
New York Central class L-2 “Mohawk”
United States | 1925 | 300 produced
L-2c Nr. 2823 with a long freight train consisting of boxcars
L-2c Nr. 2823 with a long freight train consisting of boxcars
collection Taylor Rush

After the 185 “Mohawks” of the L-1 class, the New York Central developed the more powerful L-2 class. It was also intended purely for freight service, but had a larger boiler, a feedwater heater and a booster on the trailing axle. The driver diameter remained at 69 inches or 1,753 mm and allowed a maximum permitted speed of 60 mph or 97 km/h.

Production began in 1925 at ALCO in Schenectady with 100 locomotives of the subclass L-2a. Further subclasses up to the L-2d all also came from Schenectady and brought the number to a total of 300 by 1930. They differed in the boiler dimensions, wheelbases and the feedwater heater used, which could be of the Elasco, Worthington or Coffin types.

In 1939, two L-2d were converted as prototypes for the L-3 for mixed service. These were intended to achieve higher speeds without requiring larger drivers. Thanks to roller bearings on the axles, cylinders with a smaller diameter and a higher boiler pressure, they could be approved for speeds of 80 mph

VariantL-2aL-2b, dL-2cL-2d prototype for L-3
General
Built1925-19251929-193019291939
ManufacturerALCONew York Central
Axle config4-8-2 (Mountain) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase42 ft42 ft 1 in42 ft
Fixed wheelbase18 ft
Total wheelbase84 ft 7 in84 ft 8 in84 ft 7 in
Service weight362,500 lbs368,500 lbs365,000 lbs385,100 lbs
Adhesive weight242,000 lbs247,500 lbs245,000 lbs257,000 lbs
Total weight646,200 lbs681,200 lbs675,000 lbs698,600 lbs
Axle load60,500 lbs61,875 lbs61,250 lbs64,250 lbs
Water capacity15,000 us gal
Fuel capacity42,000 lbs (coal)56,000 lbs (coal)42,000 lbs (coal)56,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,800 hp (2,834 kW)4,300 hp (3,207 kW)
Optimal speed40 mph46 mph
Top speed60 mph80 mph
Starting effort60,618 lbf60,077 lbf
Booster12,400 lbf13,750 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure225 psi250 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 27 x 30 intwo, 25 1/2 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area75.4 sq ft75.3 sq ft
Firebox area354 sq ft345 sq ft354 sq ft
Tube heating area4,099 sq ft4,211 sq ft4,202 sq ft4,292 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,453 sq ft4,556 sq ft4,646 sq ft
Superheater area1,938 sq ft1,931 sq ft
Total heating area6,391 sq ft6,487 sq ft6,577 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
booster
last changed: 12/2023
New York Central class L-3 “Mohawk”
United States | 1940 | 65 produced
No. 3005 on a works photo
No. 3005 on a works photo
collection Taylor Rush

The third of NYC's four classes of 4-8-2s, called “Mohawks” there, was the L-3. In contrast to its predecessors, it was not only intended to pull freight trains, but also passenger trains. An L-2d had already been modified accordingly for testing. The driver diameter was left at 69 inches and the decision was made not to use a second trailing axle in view of the existing infrastructure.

The differences between the L-3 and the L-2 included higher boiler pressure, smaller cylinders and several improvements to the running gear. In the case of the running gear, this included improving the counterbalancing, designing many rotating parts in lightweight construction and mounting the axles in roller bearings. The L-3b and c subclasses were equipped with a booster on the trailing axle

Of a total of 65 locomotives, 35 were actually built for mixed traffic and 30 only for freight traffic, which only had plain bearings on the driving axles. The large six-axle tenders had an exceptionally large coal capacity of 43 short tons. The water capacity, on the other hand, was relatively moderate at 15,500 gallons, but the New York Central had water troughs for refilling while running. In this way, large distances could be covered without stopping.

With the driver diameter of 69 inches, speeds of more than 80 mph could be achieved. However, the wheelbase was chosen in such a way that wheels of up to 72 inches could also be fitted. This was only applied to number 3000, which served as a prototype for the L-4.

VariantL-3aL-3b, c
General
Built1940
ManufacturerALCOALCO, Lima
Axle config4-8-2 (Mountain) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase43 ft 1 in
Fixed wheelbase19 ft
Service weight398,000 lbs
Adhesive weight264,440 lbs
Total weight772,200 lbs
Axle load66,110 lbs
Water capacity15,500 us gal
Fuel capacity86,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Indicated power5,120 hp (3,818 kW)
Optimal speed54 mph
Starting effort60,077 lbf
Booster14,000 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter69 in
Boiler pressure250 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 25 1/2 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area75.3 sq ft
Firebox area373 sq ft
Tube heating area4,303 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,676 sq ft
Superheater area2,082 sq ft
Total heating area6,758 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
passenger
freight
booster
last changed: 07/2023
New York Central class U-2
United States | 1916 | 242 produced
U-2d No. 7366 passing through a railroad crossing somewhere in Michigan
U-2d No. 7366 passing through a railroad crossing somewhere in Michigan
collection Taylor Rush

After the first class U-1 switching locomotives with a 0-8-0 wheel arrangement, which were only built in small numbers, New York Central procured a larger number of class U-2 locomotives. These were slightly lighter than their predecessors and only had a cylinder diameter of 23.5 instead of 25 inches with the same wheel diameter

From 1916 a total of twelve series were created, which differed slightly primarily in the boiler dimensions and were given the letters from a to l. The first series of the U-2a was delivered by ALCO-Brooks and the last series of the U-2l by ALCO-Schenectady. The remaining series came mainly from Lima, only the U-2d came from ALCO-Pittsburgh. The U-2i to U-2l were only delivered to subsidiaries of New York Central, more specifically to Chicago River & Indiana and Boston & Albany.

U-2h No. 7337
U-2h No. 7337

Although the last series of U-2s had not been built for the subsidiaries until 1923 and 1924, New York Central procured new class U-3 switchers as early as 1918, which corresponded to the standard USRA 0-8-0 design. Despite this, the U-2 class engines survived into the 1950s.

VariantU-2a, b, d, f and hU-2c, e, g, j, k and lU-2i
General
Built1916-19181917-1918, 1923-19241918
ManufacturerALCO, LimaLima
Axle config0-8-0 (Eight-coupled) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Service weight218,000 lbs
Adhesive weight218,000 lbs
Axle load54,500 lbs
Fuel capacitycoal
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,600 hp (1,193 kW)
Optimal speed23 mph21 mph
Starting effort44,918 lbf48,560 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter58 in
Boiler pressure185 psi200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 23 1/2 x 30 in
Boiler
Grate area50 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,285 sq ft2,300 sq ft2,245 sq ft
Superheater area530 sq ft
Total heating area2,815 sq ft2,830 sq ft2,775 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
switcher
last changed: 07/2022
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