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Steam Locomotives of the Erie Railroad[Inhalt]
Erie class E-1
United States | 1899 | 29 produced
Edwin P. Alexander, „American Locomotives 1900 to 1950”

The class E-1 of the Erie Railroad consisted of 29 Atlantic express locomotives built by Baldwin between 1899 and 1901 and rated for speeds of 100 mph. They were Camelback locomotives with a square Wootten firebox measuring 96 by 96 inches.

Propulsion was provided by a Vauclain compound engine, i.e. with high and low pressure cylinders one above the other. A rebuild began as early as 1904, in which the four cylinders were replaced by two cylinders with simple expansion. One also increased the distance between the tube sheets by six inches to increase the heating surface area.

Variantas builtrebuilt
General
Built1899-19011904-1906
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config4-4-2 (Atlantic) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase24 ft 9 in
Fixed wheelbase6 ft 7 in
Total wheelbase52 ft 9 1/2 in
Service weight142,000 lbs155,100 lbs
Adhesive weight82,000 lbs75,800 lbs
Total weight258,800 lbs271,900 lbs
Axle load41,800 lbs
Water capacity6,000 us gal
Fuel capacity24,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power1,500 hp (1,119 kW)1,525 hp (1,137 kW)
Optimal speed66 mph52 mph
Top speed100 mph
Starting effort14,570 lbf18,843 lbf
with start valve17,484 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter76 in
Boiler pressure200 psi
Expansion typecompoundsimple
Cylindersfour, HP: 13 x 26 in
and LP: 22 x 26 in
two, 18 x 26 in
Boiler
Grate area64 sq ft
Firebox area160 sq ft
Tube heating area2,110 sq ft2,171 sq ft
Evaporative heating area2,270 sq ft2,331 sq ft
Total heating area2,270 sq ft2,331 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
camelback
Vauclain compound
last changed: 06/2023
Erie class L-1
United States | 1907 | 3 produced
Locomotivve Magazine, September 1907

In the early years of the twentieth century, Mallet locomotives served only as an articulated solution for narrow-gauge railways. The L-1 of the Erie Railroad of 1907 was one of the first to show that very large freight locomotives could also be built with the Mallet principle. At the time it was commissioned, it was the largest and most powerful locomotive in the world. Since it was only intended as a pusher locomotive and did not have to reach high speeds, there was no need for running axles. Thus, all eight axles were available a adhesive weight. The wheel arrangement was soon called “Angus”.

No. 2601
No. 2601

A Wooten firebox with a grate area of 100 square feet was used to maximize the energy yield from low-grade coal. In order to still ensure a good view for the driver, the L-1 was built as a camelback engine and thus had the driver's cab above the rearmost axle of the front bogie. It was the only camelback Mallet ever built.

Schematic drawing
Schematic drawing
Railway and Locomotive Engineering, September 1907

Only three examples were built, which were used on the Delaware and Susquehanna divisions to push trains up a 1.3 percent incline. They were rebuilt to a more conventional form in 1921. The driver's cab was moved to the rear and two running axles were added, whereby they now had the wheel arrangement 2-8-8-2.

General
Built1907
ManufacturerALCO
Axle config0-8-8-0 (Angus (Mallet)) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Length84 ft 9 3/4 in
Wheelbase39 ft 2 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft 3 in
Total wheelbase70 ft 5 in
Service weight410,000 lbs
Adhesive weight410,000 lbs
Total weight577,700 lbs
Axle load54,100 lbs
Water capacity8,500 us gal
Fuel capacity32,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,000 hp (2,237 kW)
Optimal speed22 mph
Starting effort88,890 lbf
with start valve106,668 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter51 in
Boiler pressure215 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylindersfour, HP: 25 x 28 in
and LP: 39 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area100 sq ft
Firebox area348.3 sq ft
Tube heating area4,965.7 sq ft
Evaporative heating area5,314 sq ft
Total heating area5,314 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
Mallet
camelback
last changed: 06/2022
Erie class P-1
United States | 1914 | 3 produced
Ron Ziel, „American Locomotives 1858 to 1949”

On mountain routes such as Susquehanna Hill, the Erie Railroad had the problem that the 3,500 to 5,500 ton trains, each pulled by a Consolidation or Mikado locomotive in the lowlands, could only be brought over the incline with difficulty. Two helper locomotives were often necessary, although some mallets were already being used. With the support of George R. Henderson of Baldwin, a triplex locomotive was built, which had three four-axle engine groups. Only the prototype was built in 1914, christened “Matt H. Shay” after a well-known railroad employee.

The six cylinders were all of the same dimensions to give compound action with two high pressure and four low pressure cylinders. The cylinders in the middle acted as high-pressure cylinders, with the exhaust steam from the right-hand cylinder being fed into the cylinders of the front bogie and the exhaust steam from the left into the cylinders on the rear bogie. Only the exhaust from the front low-pressure cylinders went into the smokebox, while the rear operated a feedwater heater in the tender.

During operation, it was quickly noticed that the boiler was not producing enough steam to reach significant speeds. Although the grate on the following two 1916 engines was increased from 90 to 122 square feet, they too failed to produce sufficient steam. Even the large firebox with brick arch and combustion chamber could not improve this situation. As a result, the locomotives were only used as pushers, where average speeds were barely over 10 mph

No. 700 “Matt H. Shay” in May 1915 in Susquehanna, Pennsylvania
No. 700 “Matt H. Shay” in May 1915 in Susquehanna, Pennsylvania
John B. Allen

The powered tender also proved problematic in practical use. It offered a smaller capacity than conventional tenders of the same size because the engine took up space and increased the empty mass. When the supplies were used up, the adhesive weight of the tender also dropped so much that it quickly began to slip. Since the other chassis groups were now also suddenly subject to greater loads, they quickly lost grip. Thus, their number stagnated at three and the Class XA of the Virginian remained the only other triplex locomotive that was built. A quadruple locomotive already planned by Henderson was not implemented. The three examples of the P-1 were retired in 1929, 1931 and 1933.

General
Built1914, 1916
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config2-8-8-8-2 (Triplex) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase71 ft 6 in
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase91 ft
Service weight853,050 lbs
Adhesive weight761,600 lbs
Total weight1,169,750 lbs
Axle load70,100 lbs
Water capacity11,600 us gal
Fuel capacity32,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,000 hp (2,983 kW)
Optimal speed11 mph
Starting effort235,008 lbf
with start valve282,010 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure210 psi
Expansion typecompound
Cylinderssix, HP: 36 x 32 in
and LP: 36 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area121.5 sq ft
Firebox area468 sq ft
Tube heating area6,418 sq ft
Evaporative heating area6,886 sq ft
Superheater area1,584 sq ft
Total heating area8,470 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
triplex
last changed: 09/2022
Erie class K-5a and b
United States | 1923 | 11 produced
H. W. Pontin / collection Taylor Rush

Based on the USRA Heavy Pacifics, which the Erie was the only one to receive, it received ten more locomotives in 1923. These were similar in size to the USRA engines, but had a larger superheater and were slightly heavier. The original 10,000 gallon water and 16 short tons of coal tenders were soon replaced with larger 16,500 gallon, 24 short tons tenders. In 1926, a single K-5b was ordered to test uniflow cylinders. Since these did not lead to the desired results, they were replaced with conventional cylinders.

VariantK-5a (large tender)K-5b
General
Built19231926
ManufacturerBaldwin
Axle config4-6-2 (Pacific) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase37 ft 1 in
Fixed wheelbase14 ft
Total wheelbase80 ft 3 3/4 in
Service weight323,000 lbs
Adhesive weight205,300 lbs
Total weight637,200 lbs529,000 lbs
Axle load68,900 lbs
Water capacity16,500 us gal12,000 us gal
Fuel capacity48,000 lbs (coal)32,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power3,450 hp (2,573 kW)3,250 hp (2,424 kW)
Optimal speed48 mph44 mph
Starting effort46,121 lbf47,238 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter79 in
Boiler pressure210 psi200 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 27 x 28 intwo, 28 x 28 in
Boiler
Grate area70.8 sq ft70.3 sq ft
Firebox area381 sq ft388 sq ft
Tube heating area3,346 sq ft3,343 sq ft
Evaporative heating area3,727 sq ft3,731 sq ft
Superheater area1,070 sq ft
Total heating area4,797 sq ft4,801 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
express
last changed: 04/2023
Erie classes S-1 to S-4
United States | 1927 | 105 produced
S-4 No. 3397 in August 1936
S-4 No. 3397 in August 1936
George E. Votava / collection Taylor Rush

The Erie was the American railroad that ordered the greatest number of 2-8-4 “Berkshire” locomotives. These 105 locomotives were not only delivered by all three major manufacturers, but also had the biggest heating surface of all Berkshires. As usual for the late twenties, they were fitted with thermic syphons, arch tubes, Worthington feedwater heaters and had a limited cutoff.

25 of the class S-1 were built in 1927 by ALCO, followed by another 25 S-2 in the same year by Lima. 35 S-3 were built by Baldwin in 1928 and 20 S-4 again by Lima in 1929. Both Lima subclasses were designed for a boiler pressure of 250 psi, but operated at only 225 psi like their sisters. These classes made it possible for the Erie to greatly accelerate their freight services and they were all scrapped between 1950 and 1952.

VariantS-1S-2S-3S-4
General
Built192719281929
ManufacturerALCOLimaBaldwinLima
Axle config2-8-4 (Berkshire) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase42 ft44 ft
Fixed wheelbase18 ft 3 in
Total wheelbase86 ft 2 in86 ft 7 in91 ft 7 in91 ft 6 1/2 in
Service weight443,000 lbs457,500 lbs468,600 lbs
Adhesive weight276,000 lbs281,000 lbs284,670 lbs286,500 lbs
Total weight753,000 lbs787,500 lbs827,950 lbs846,600 lbs
Axle load71,000 lbs70,800 lbs71,700 lbs72,000 lbs
Water capacity16,500 us gal20,750 us gal20,800 us gal
Fuel capacity48,000 lbs (coal)54,000 lbs (coal)56,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power4,800 hp (3,579 kW)5,100 hp (3,803 kW)4,800 hp (3,579 kW)5,100 hp (3,803 kW)
Optimal speed43 mph41 mph43 mph41 mph
Starting effort71,014 lbf78,904 lbf71,014 lbf78,904 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter70 in
Boiler pressure225 psi250 psi225 psi250 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 28 1/2 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area100 sq ft
Firebox area449 sq ft448 sq ft437 sq ft449 sq ft
Tube heating area5,250 sq ft5,249 sq ft5,254 sq ft5,246 sq ft
Evaporative heating area5,699 sq ft5,697 sq ft5,691 sq ft5,695 sq ft
Superheater area2,448 sq ft2,480 sq ft2,545 sq ft
Total heating area8,147 sq ft8,177 sq ft8,171 sq ft8,240 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 04/2024
Erie class N-1
United States | 1911 | 155 produced
Die Lokomotive, August 1934

To accelerate heavy freight trains, the Erie Railroad ordered 20 class N-1 locomotives from Baldwin in 1911, which were the heaviest Mikados at the time. Since this design was a success, a total of 135 more were ordered, which were also manufactured by ALCO in Schenectady and Lima. The boiler pressure of the individual locomotives was between 170 and 200 psi

From 1927 the locomotives were modernized, adding a feed water heater, removing some pipes in the boiler and setting the pressure uniformly at 190 psi. Many received a mechanical stoker, but at least 50 remained hand-fired. Almost all were scrapped between 1947 and 1951, few were sold.

Variantas builtrebuilt
General
Built1911-19131927-1941
ManufacturerALCO, Baldwin, Lima
Axle config2-8-2 (Mikado) 
Gauge4 ft 8 1/2 in (Standard gauge)
Dimensions and Weights
Wheelbase35 ft
Fixed wheelbase16 ft 6 in
Total wheelbase66 ft 10 1/2 in67 ft 1 in
Service weight328,600 lbs
Adhesive weight236,950 lbs232,900 lbs
Total weight508,900 lbs
Axle load61,600 lbs
Water capacity9,000 us gal
Fuel capacity32,000 lbs (coal)
Power
Power sourcesteam
Estimated power2,750 hp (2,051 kW)3,000 hp (2,237 kW)
Optimal speed30 mph
Starting effort57,543 lbf64,313 lbf
Power Plant
Driver diameter63 in
Boiler pressure170 psi190 psi
Expansion typesimple
Cylinderstwo, 28 x 32 in
Boiler
Grate area70 sq ft
Firebox area263 sq ft
Tube heating area3,939 sq ft3,841 sq ft
Evaporative heating area4,202 sq ft4,104 sq ft
Superheater area877 sq ft843 sq ft
Total heating area5,079 sq ft4,947 sq ft
Calculated Values
steam locomotive
freight
last changed: 04/2023
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